6.9/10
13,058
145 user 62 critic

The Stepford Wives (1975)

Joanna Eberhart has come to the quaint little town of Stepford, Connecticut with her family, but soon discovers there lies a sinister truth in the all too perfect behavior of the female residents.

Director:

Writers:

(novel), (screenplay)
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »
Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Comedy | Sci-Fi | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.2/10 X  

What does it take to become a Stepford wife, a woman perfect beyond belief? Ask the Stepford husbands, who've created this high-tech terrifying little town, in a very modern comedy-thriller.

Director: Frank Oz
Stars: Nicole Kidman, Bette Midler, Matthew Broderick
The Stepford Children (TV Movie 1987)
Sci-Fi | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.3/10 X  

In this sequel to The Stepford Wives, Steven and Laura Harding (along with their kids David and Mary) have moved to the quiet community of Stepford, CT. Steven joins the men's club, which ... See full summary »

Director: Alan J. Levi
Stars: Barbara Eden, Don Murray, Tammy Lauren
Mystery | Sci-Fi | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4.8/10 X  

A TV reporter arrives in Stepford to do a story on the American town with the lowest crime and divorce rates and the tightest real-estate market (no one ever leaves). She needs an assistant... See full summary »

Director: Robert Fuest
Stars: Sharon Gless, Julie Kavner, Audra Lindley
Demon Seed (1977)
Horror | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

A scientist creates Proteus--an organic super computer with artificial intelligence which becomes obsessed with human beings, and in particular the creators wife.

Director: Donald Cammell
Stars: Julie Christie, Fritz Weaver, Gerrit Graham
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
...
...
...
Dr. Fancher (as Carol Rossen)
...
Carole Mallory ...
Toni Reid ...
...
Barbara Rucker ...
...
...
Robert Fields ...
...

What You Missed at San Diego Comic-Con 2017

From the madness of the convention floor to the emotional panel reveals and star-studded interviews, catch up on all the unforgettable sights from Comic-Con.

Browse Our Guide to Comic-Con

Edit

Storyline

The Stepford Wives is about a small suburb where the women happily go about their housework - cleaning, doing laundry, and cooking gourmet meals - to please their husbands. Unfortunately, Bobbie and Joanna discover that the village's wives have been replaced with robots, and Joanna's husband wants in on the action. Written by Kevin <Kibble@vm.temple.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A very modern suspense story from the author of Rosemary's Baby. See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

12 February 1975 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Die Frauen von Stepford  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (2004 DVD release) | (2001 DVD release)

Sound Mix:

Color:

(TVC)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Tina Louise played Ginger in the TV show Gilligan's Island (1964) while Judith Baldwin played Ginger in the TV movie Rescue from Gilligan's Island (1978). See more »

Goofs

In the last scene in the supermarket "changed" Joanna does not have large breasts anymore, but the night she was "replacing" the original Joanna she had. See more »

Quotes

Dale Coba: It's nothing like you imagine, just a, another stage. Think about it like that, and there's nothing to it.
Joanna Eberhart: Why?
Dale Coba: Why? Because we can.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Airborne (2012) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
The Perfect Wife
9 April 2005 | by (Biloxi, Mississippi) – See all my reviews

She is a meticulous housekeeper, flawless cook, thrifty shopper, adoring mother, perfect wife, always well groomed, always ready to please. But not, of course, a career woman, particularly if her success makes her husband feel belittled. Even today, more than thirty years after Ira Levin's bestseller startled the reading public, we are likely to refer to such a woman as "a Stepford wife"--a creature who seems both perfect and perfectly shallow.

The 1974 film version follows the Levin novel quite closely. Joanna Eberhart is a beautiful young woman of the era in which the women's moment had come of age: intelligent, forthright, and meeting her husband on equal terms. Then she, her husband, and their children move from New York to the small town of Stepford, where she is dismayed to find that most of the neighboring women seem engaged in a competition to have the neatest house, the best-groomed children, the most satisfied husband. Joanna is relieved to find women like herself in newcomers Bobbie and Charmaine, but even so, it seems... odd. So odd that she begins to question her sanity.

The film works on several levels, not the least of which is the macabre sense of humor with which director Byran Forbes endows the film: it is often very funny in a disquieting sort of way, as when Joanna and Bobbie's efforts to start a women's group results in a gathering of perfectly manicured women exchanging recipes and comparing floor polishes, or when Joanna and Bobbie accidentally overhear a Stepford couple making love. But for all the wittiness involved, THE STEPFORD WIVES is rooted in the women's movement of the 1970s, an era in which "a woman's place" was hotly debated on a national level. Just what is "a woman's place?" And to what lengths might men go to keep their women in traditional roles? Unlike many similar films, THE STEPFORD WIVES has tremendous restraint--and moreover a truly exceptional cast. Katherine Ross' talents were never before or after so well used, and Paula Prentiss gives perhaps her single most memorable performance here as Joanna's friend Bobbie. The supporting cast is equally fine, most particularly so with Patrick O'Neal as the unnerving "Diz" and a nice turn by Tina Louise as Charmaine.

Ultimately, THE STEPFORD WIVES is something of a "one trick pony:" it works best on a first viewing, when you don't know what's coming, and on subsequent viewings the film tends to read as unnecessarily slow. Even so, it is an interesting little cultural artifact, an "almost classic" that is sure to give you pause the next time your better half announces he is joining a men's club. Recommended.

Gary F. Taylor, aka GFT, Amazon Reviewer


26 of 30 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page