7.1/10
58
1 user 2 critic

The Holy Inquisition (1974)

El santo oficio (original title)
Gaspar de Carvajal, a Dominican, has not seen his family since the age of 10 when he was sent away to pursue the religious life. He attends the funeral of his father, where he notices that ... See full summary »

Director:

Reviews
2 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

The story of a disciplined and sexually driven man who keeps his family isolated in his home for years to protect them from the "evil nature" of human beings while inventing (with his wife)... See full summary »

Director: Arturo Ripstein
Stars: Claudio Brook, Rita Macedo, Arturo Beristáin
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

Family honor, greed, machismo, homophobia, and the dreams of whores collide in a Mexican town. Rich, elderly Don Alejo is poised to sell the town for a profit, needing only to buy a ... See full summary »

Director: Arturo Ripstein
Stars: Roberto Cobo, Fernando Soler, Lucha Villa
Deep Crimson (1996)
Crime | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

The life of a man who preys on unsuspecting women for a living is changed when he finds an accomplice in the woman who loves and controls him.

Director: Arturo Ripstein
Stars: Regina Orozco, Daniel Giménez Cacho, Sherlyn
Bleak Street (2015)
Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

In the early morning hours, two elderly whores go back to their hovels. They are not tired from working. They are tired of not doing do. One has problems at home with her teenage daughter ... See full summary »

Director: Arturo Ripstein
Stars: Alberto Estrella, Leticia Gómez Rivera, Silvia Pasquel
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

Every Friday, the Colonel puts on his only suit and goes to the dock to await a letter announcing the arrival of his pension. But the townsfolk all know that this pension will never come. ... See full summary »

Director: Arturo Ripstein
Stars: Fernando Luján, Marisa Paredes, Salma Hayek
Life Sentence (1979)
Crime | Drama | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

A former felon is blackmailed by a corrupt policeman and forced to commit a crime.

Director: Arturo Ripstein
Stars: Pedro Armendáriz Jr., Narciso Busquets, Ernesto Gómez Cruz
Time to Die (1966)
Drama | Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

After serving his conviction, a former gunman returns to his town planning to live a quiet life, however, the sons of a man hi killed have other plans.

Director: Arturo Ripstein
Stars: Marga López, Jorge Martínez de Hoyos, Enrique Rocha
Drama | Horror | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

Old aunt Alejandra goes to live with a Mexican middle-class family; she's bitter and the children tease her and make her life miserable, but the old woman is truly a witch, and takes revenge.

Director: Arturo Ripstein
Stars: Diana Bracho, Isabela Corona, Manuel Ojeda
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

A very poor and handicaped man, lives in a small town in Mexico with his mother. He works announcing things along the town ("The priest lost his cow, if someone sees it ..."). He is very ... See full summary »

Director: Arturo Ripstein
Stars: Ernesto Gómez Cruz, Blanca Guerra, Alejandro Parodi
Biography | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6/10 X  

CIAO! MANHATTAN parallels Andy Warhol Factory star Edie Sedgwick's glory days in the late 60's through her inevitable downfall and the tragic addiction that would take her life only weeks after filming wrapped in 1971.

Directors: John Palmer, David Weisman
Stars: Edie Sedgwick, Wesley Hayes, Isabel Jewell
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  
Director: Arturo Ripstein
Stars: Isela Vega, Mario Almada, Hilda Aguirre
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Director: Arturo Ripstein
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Jorge Luke ...
Luis de Carvajal
Diana Bracho ...
Mariana de Carvajal
Claudio Brook ...
Fray Alonso de Peralta
Ana Mérida ...
Francisca de Carvajal
Rafael Banquells ...
Principal de la Real Audiencia
Mario Castillón Bracho ...
Gregorio López
Arturo Beristáin ...
Baltasar
Jorge Fegán ...
Padre Oroz
Farnesio de Bernal ...
Fray Hernando
Virgilio Hernández ...
Martoz de Bohorquez
Antonio Bravo ...
Rabino Morales
Peter Gonzales Falcon ...
Fray Gaspar (as Peter Gonzales)
Florencio Castelló ...
Fray Lorenzo de Albornoz
...
Díaz Márquez
Silvia Mariscal ...
Justa Méndez
Edit

Storyline

Gaspar de Carvajal, a Dominican, has not seen his family since the age of 10 when he was sent away to pursue the religious life. He attends the funeral of his father, where he notices that the body was washed, then buried in a shroud and without a coffin. Gaspar tells his confessor that he suspects his family, Jews converted to Catholicism, are still following the old ways. Father Lorenzo says this matter must be taken before the Inquisition. Alonso de Peralta, chief Inquisitor of New Spain, orders the Carvajal family arrested on the testimony of their son. Hernando, a Franciscan friar, is sent as a spy to the cell of Luis, Gaspar's brother. Luis's faith converts Hernando to Judaism. Under torture, Luis's mother Francisca confesses. Each family member renounces the Jewish heresy and is allowed to leave prison. But they are warned. If they revert to Judaism a second time, they will be burnt at the stake... Written by David Carless

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

We have to denounce..pursue..destroy..the ones that do not think like us.

Genres:

Drama | History

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

| |

Release Date:

21 February 1975 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Holy Inquisition  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Eastmancolor)
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Crazy Credits

This film is a fiction inspired by real events and real documents. The reality to which it aspires is not the certainty of history but the likelihood of the fable. See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
An inquiry into the Inquisition
23 October 1999 | by (Toronto, Canada) – See all my reviews

In the 15th century, at the time of the Reconquista when the Castilian-Aragonese monarchy regained Spain for Catholicism, the Spanish Inquisition was created to perpetuate that transformation through the rooting out of heresy.

This film, directed by Arturo Ripstein, is about the workings of the Inquisition in 16th c. Mexico where the Marranos are a pressing issue for the Church, those Jews who had converted to Catholicism but continued to practise the old religion in secret: Latin-speaking on the outside, Hebrew-speaking on the inside.

I had the opportunity to see this unusual film at a screening of the Toronto Jewish Film Society. (The society executive had spent four years trying to obtain a print.) As far as I am aware, in the theatre there were no adherents of the one true, apostolic Catholic faith, nor any of the heresy of Mohammed for that matter. The vast majority of the audience were representatives of the older heresy of Moses and Abraham. I was there representing the newer heresy of Luther and Calvin. And it's fascinating to report that we heretics disagreed completely in our reaction to this film.

Jews, unanimously it seems, found it shocking, saying that the fate of the Marranos was just a short step away from the gas chambers.

The Lone Protestant on the other hand was impressed by the leniency of the treatment the recidivist Marranos received, how many opportunities they had to survive simply by reaffirming the faith to which most of them seemed genuinely half-converted anyway. Even lip service would have sufficed. Render unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's, as another Jew had once said in trying circumstances.

I was expecting the Inquisitional prosecution to be the kind with a predetermined outcome, like the traditional ducking stool for witches: if the witch sinks in the water (and drowns), she was falsely accused and innocent; if she floats (and lives), she must be put to death. But there was nothing of that sort of sham jurisprudence here at all. And nothing like the ferocious Inquisitional scene in "The Name of the Rose" (1986) featuring the real-life Bernard(o) Gui, hammer of witches and scourge of heretics, particularly Waldensian ones. Here in Mexico the Inquisitors seem to be playing by Marquess of Queensberry rules.

Jews in the audience saw this film as a damning indictment of an anti-Semitic Inquisition; I saw it as an apologia, even a whitewash. A clear division between the sons of Shem on the one hand and the son of Japheth on the other.

To uninformed eyes like mine, "The Holy Office" seems very precise in its historical detail. But then there's this odd disclaimer at the end, saying that the film is based not on history but rather on the legends surrounding the time period (whatever that means). I don't know what the politico-religious situation was in Mexico in the early '70's when the PRI's grip was still so strong.

Does this disclaimer amount to some awkward excuse for why the film does not take a more critical view of Mexican history, a tacit acknowledgement that its punches have been pulled?

Or is it some sort of defensive manoeuvre by the filmmaker, an attempt to deflect conservative criticism by implying that the film is only a fantasy?

Regardless, I found this a provocative film about a fascinating subject. It's a pity it's so hard to see.


4 of 7 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
DVD release? scottconnors01
Discuss The Holy Inquisition (1974) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?