6.8/10
1,553
18 user 26 critic

Royal Flash (1975)

Ne'er-do-well Harry Flashman is coerced by Otto von Bismark into impersonating a prince.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (novel)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Richard Pearson ...
Duchy Chamberlain
Alan Howland ...
Duchy Chamberlain
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Storyline

Captain Harry Flashman of the British army is a cad, a coward, and a lecher who always seems to come off inadvertently heroic. While romancing renowned courtesan Lola Montes, Harry is recruited against his will by Otto von Bismarck to substitute for a lookalike Prussian prince ostensibly in order to help Bismarck enlarge his hold over German duchies. But Bismarck has something more sinister in mind for both Harry and the prince. Written by Jim Beaver <jumblejim@prodigy.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

SWASH - As it's never been buckled before! See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

October 1975 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

El cobarde heroico  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In 1970, Richard Lester had planned to make a film of "Flashman", the first of George Macdonald Fraser's novels, from a screenplay by Charles Wood and Frank Muir and with John Alderton in the title role. Because of expense, it was canceled with only days to go before the start of shooting. Half a decade later, having collaborated with Fraser on his two "Musketeers" films with huge success, Lester tried to reactivate the project, but found it easier to set up a film of Fraser's second novel, "Royal Flash", perhaps because the story is a parody of "The Prisoner Of Zenda", which had been filmed several times with great popularity. Even so, United Artists went cold on the idea shortly before filming was due to begin, but this time Lester was able successfully to transfer the project to Twentieth Century Fox. However, the film proved a critical and box-office failure, and was cut from a running time of 118 minutes to 96 minutes for general release in Britain (which accounts for certain well-known actors either not appearing or doing so only very briefly). George MacDonald Fraser so disliked the movie that he would not consent to having another one based on his Flashman novels made in his lifetime. See more »

Goofs

At around 48 minutes, as Flashman and Rudi enter Strackenz, one of the cheering crowd of townspeople can be seen to pull out a compact camera and take a photograph of the procession, before resuming cheering. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Harry Flashman: So, the last thing I have to tell you young fellows is this: play up and play the game, honor your queen and country, mind what your masters tell you, say your prayers each night, keep your minds and your bodies clean, take a cold bath each day, and you'll find you can always look the world in the eye like an English gentleman.
[audience members concurs, muttering "Here, here"]
Harry Flashman: Now my lads, I'm just a simple soldier.
[Audience members murmer objections and so does the headmaster]
Harry Flashman: Yes...
[...]
See more »

Connections

Spoofs The Prisoner of Zenda (1937) See more »

Soundtracks

Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg: Vorspiel
(uncredited)
Music by Richard Wagner
Arranged by Ken Thorne
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User Reviews

 
ROYAL FLASH (Richard Lester, 1975) ***
3 April 2008 | by (Naxxar, Malta) – See all my reviews

Going into this one, I was aware it was part of a literary franchise by George MacDonald Fraser (who personally adapted the novel of the same name to the screen – incidentally, he died quite recently) involving roguish British officer Harry Flashman (the name itself derives from the student bully of the literary classic for children "Tom Brown's Schooldays"!). The film-makers, in fact, hoped this would take off a' la the James Bond extravaganzas – but, clearly, the idea was doomed to failure, since old-fashioned and expensive costume pictures were no longer trendy by this time; for the record, not long ago I'd watched another contemporary tongue-in-cheek epic – Jerzy Skolimowski's film of Arthur Conan Doyle's THE ADVENTURES OF GERARD (1970), which was partly shot in Malta! Besides, I think it was a mistake to have started off with a novel whose plot had already been redone to death over the years – the protagonist, in fact, goes through a "Prisoner Of Zenda"-type adventure where he has to impersonate a look-alike royal!

Even so, on its own account, the film is undeniably stylish, considerably funny (effortlessly going from verbal wit to broad slapstick) and blessed with a tremendous cast (Malcolm McDowell, Alan Bates, Oliver Reed as future German political leader Otto von Bismarck, Florinda Bolkan as actress/courtesan Lola Montes – who, obviously, had already been the protagonist of Max Ophuls' sublime but ill-fated 1955 film of that name, Britt Ekland – underused as McDowell's frigid intended, Lionel Jeffries - sporting a metallic hand, Michael Hordern, Alastair Sim – amusingly popping in merely to referee a pistol duel between females, Joss Ackland, Tom Bell, Christopher Cazenove and Bob Hoskins). At the same time, however, it fails to scale the heights of director Lester's previous swashbuckling saga – THE THREE MUSKETEERS (1973) and its simultaneously-filmed sequel THE FOUR MUSKETEERS (1974).

Interestingly, the opening sequence – with McDowell speaking at a school assembly with the Union Jack behind him – is actually lifted from the unforgettable prologue to PATTON (1970) where, in that case, George C. Scott had addressed the (non-visible) troops in front of the U.S. flag! Other notable assets here are the cinematography (by Geofftrey Unsworth), the production design (courtesy of Terence Marsh) and the score (from Lester regular Ken Thorne). By the way, in the liner notes it's stated that the film was originally previewed at 121 minutes and later cut to 98 for general release – but the DVD edition I've watched, and which was released only recently as a SE by Fox, is a bit longer than that (running 102 minutes, to be exact)!


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