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Beauty vs Beast: Grit's the Word

Jason from Mnpp here wishing the actor Jeff Bridges a happy 68th birthday today with this week's "Beauty vs Beast" poll. What's your favorite performance from Bridges? Mine is far and away his performance in Peter Weir's wildly underrated 1993 plane-crash survivor drama Fearless, but that movie doesn't lend itself well to this series. So instead we'll go with something more recent, namely his turn as "Rooster Cogburn" in the Coens' 2010 update of True Grit. Don't you wish he'd won his Oscar for this rather than Crazy Heart? And we'll pit him against his fine co-star and co-nominee Hailee Steinfeld. Good luck with this one!

Previously Last week twas everybody's current favorite momma drama Lady Bird's turn in the hot seat, and daughter came out victorious - Saorsie Ronan went all Baller / Anarchist and took 55% of your vote. Said chasm301, giving me a good chuckle:

"Lady Bird is basically the
See full article at FilmExperience »

Famed Cinematographer Harry Stradling Jr. Dies at 92

Harry Stradling Jr., the two-time Oscar-nominated cinematographer who shot such films as Little Big Man, The Way We Were, 1776 and Rooster Cogburn, has died. He was 92.

Stradling Jr. died Oct. 17 at the Motion Picture Home in Woodland Hills, his son, John, told The Hollywood Reporter.

He was the son of another acclaimed director of photography, Harry Stradling Sr., who won Academy Awards for The Picture of Dorian Gray and My Fair Lady and was nominated a dozen other times (for A Streetcar Named Desire, Guys and Dolls, Funny Girl, etc.).

Stradling Jr., though, certainly carved out a...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Famed Cinematographer Harry Stradling Jr. Dies at 92

Famed Cinematographer Harry Stradling Jr. Dies at 92
Harry Stradling Jr., the two-time Oscar-nominated cinematographer who shot such films as Little Big Man, The Way We Were, 1776 and Rooster Cogburn, has died. He was 92.

Stradling Jr. died Oct. 17 at the Motion Picture Home in Woodland Hills, his son, John, told The Hollywood Reporter.

He was the son of another acclaimed director of photography, Harry Stradling Sr., who won Academy Awards for The Picture of Dorian Gray and My Fair Lady and was nominated a dozen other times (for A Streetcar Named Desire, Guys and Dolls, Funny Girl, etc.).

Stradling Jr., though, certainly carved out a...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Review: ‘Only the Brave’ Depicts Tragedy with Realistic Bravado

The word hero seems to be mentioned a great deal in this age of the 24-hour news cycle, but the members of the Granite Mountain “Hotshots” genuinely deserve to be known as such. They were the best at what they did. This bunch of regular, but courageous firefighters were more than just co-workers: they were a brotherhood that continuously risked their lives trying to contain fast-spreading wildfires. As part of the Prescott Fire Fepartment, which consisted of 92 career personnel, split among five fire stations, this municipal team of “hotshots” — which, in firefighting terms, means the cream of the crop — were the elites of their profession.

Containment is what these brave men and women have as a goal whenever a fire spreads. As a character in the film would say, they are “fighting fire with fire.” This happens with the creation of a fireline, which is accomplished by doing a controlled
See full article at The Film Stage »

Glen Campbell Dies: Honey-Voiced Singer-Songwriter & Oscar Nominee Was 81

Glen Campbell Dies: Honey-Voiced Singer-Songwriter & Oscar Nominee Was 81
Glen Campbell, the honey-voiced singer-songwriter-guitarist who had a slew of country and pop hits in the 1960s and ’70s and earned an Oscar nom for Best Song from the 2014 docu Glen Campbell: I’ll Be Me, died today in Nashville. He was 81. He had struggled with Alzheimer’s since 2011. Campbell starred in the classic 1969 Western True Grit opposite John Wayne, who landed his only Oscar for the lead role of Rooster Cogburn. Campbell had a country top 10 and minor pop hit…
See full article at Deadline »

Country Music Legend Glen Campbell Dies at 81

Country Music Legend Glen Campbell Dies at 81
Country legend Glen Campbell, whose crossover hits “Gentle on My Mind,” “By the Time I Get to Phoenix” and “Rhinestone Cowboy” forged a lasting bridge between country and pop music, died Tuesday. He was 81.

In 2011, Campbell announced he had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and mounted a well-publicized farewell tour. His official Twitter posted the news. His daughter, Ashley Campbell, also shared a heartfelt message about the news.

Campbell was hardly the first country artist to break out of the rural regional radio ghetto — the Nashville Sound of Patsy Cline and Jim Reeves had produced several wide-appeal hits in the early ’60s — but his influence in expanding country music’s parameters and fanbase was substantial. His signature hits often combined orchestral arrangements and traditional pop hooks with countrified lyrical themes and vocal stylings, catalyzing both the “countrypolitan” and soft rock subgenres that would proliferate in the 1970s. (John Denver and Kenny Rogers both owe much of
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Country Music Legend Glen Campbell Dies at 81

Country Music Legend Glen Campbell Dies at 81
Country legend Glen Campbell, whose crossover hits “Gentle on My Mind,” “By the Time I Get to Phoenix” and “Rhinestone Cowboy” forged a lasting bridge between country and pop music, died Tuesday. He was 81.

In 2011, Campbell announced he had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and mounted a well-publicized farewell tour. His official Twitter posted the news of his death. His daughter, Ashley Campbell, also shared a heartfelt message online.

Campbell was hardly the first country artist to break out of the rural regional radio ghetto — the Nashville Sound of Patsy Cline and Jim Reeves had produced several wide-appeal hits in the early ’60s — but his influence in expanding country music’s parameters and fanbase was substantial. His signature hits often combined orchestral arrangements and traditional pop hooks with countrified lyrical themes and vocal stylings, catalyzing both the “countrypolitan” and soft rock subgenres that would proliferate in the 1970s. (John Denver and Kenny Rogers both owe much
See full article at Variety - TV News »

'Hell or High Water': The Story Behind Summer's Sleeper Hit

Chris Pine kept fixating on a single image. "I had this picture in my head," the 35-year-old actor recalls, his voice echoing over a speakerphone from Austin, Texas. "It was two guys on a porch, real rustic. One of them is sitting, the other is standing, kind of leaning on one of the porch's columns. Both are sort of staring out in the distance while the sun's going down." He stops for a second, then continues. "I just kind of got into my brain after I read the script. It
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Review: Tension Rises in Excellent Hell Or High Water

A rare bright light in a largely disappointing summer movie season, Hell or High Water is a sizzling modern noir western with a nifty script and a trio of superb performances.

Writer Taylor Sheridan fuels the screenplay with a sense of moral complexity similar to what he did with the cartel thriller Sicario, and director David Mackenzie (Starred Up) excels at balancing scenes of jaw-clenching tension and a laid back Southern vibe in the rest of the film. Set in a sleepy, debt-ridden Texas town where even lawyers aren't fans of the way banks have screwed people over, the film follows straight arrow Toby Howard (Chris Pine), who enlists his criminal brother Tanner (Ben Foster) to help him rob banks in order to pay off the reverse mortgage on their mother's ranch. They're smart about the robberies — only taking loose cash in the drawers, avoiding large bills, never going after the vaults,
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Jeff Bridges Joins Cast Of Kingsman: The Golden Circle

  • TheMovieBit
It’s been all go on the casting front for Kingsman: The Golden Circle in the last few weeks, with Channing Tatum, Halle Berry, Julianne Moore, and, would you believe it, Elton John joining Matthew Vaughn’s highly anticipated spy sequel alongside the returning Taron Egerton, Mark Strong, and Colin Firth. Now, another casting announcement has come our way, and congratulations Mr. Vaughn, you have won at casting with the news that Jeff Bridges is coming onboard, no doubt playing a member of The Kingsman’s American counterpart, The Statesman. The Golden Circle casting so far has been accompanied by specialised posters, and Bridges’ comes with the most perfect Jeff Bridges infused poster ever, complete with glass of scotch and the word ‘vexing’. No word on who will be playing at this stage, but with a character named Jack described as a ‘swaggering, sharp shooting cowboy’ you would think that
See full article at TheMovieBit »

Academy Awards Film Series: Near-Record-Breaking Oscar Loser Far Superior to Wayne Original

'True Grit' 2010: Hailee Steinfeld and Jeff Bridges. 'True Grit' 2010 review: 'Far Superior' to 1969 John Wayne Western I've gotten to the point with the Coen brothers where I just expect something wonderful every time they make a movie. For me, that was the case even with an effort like True Grit. For others, however, it was different. When the Coens announced their plans to adapt Charles Portis' novel, heads turned and were scratched by many. After all, not only were the brothers going to adapt a book, something they had done only once before (twice if you count The Odyssey), but they were going to remake a movie made famous by John Wayne in 1969. To many, especially lovers of Westerns, touching True Grit was sacrilege. But the Coens weren't deterred, and thankfully so. Their adaptation of True Grit is not only far superior to Henry Hathaway's 1969 version, it
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Maggie Smith ('The Lady in the Van'): Oscar comeback like Katharine Hepburn?

Maggie Smith ('The Lady in the Van'): Oscar comeback like Katharine Hepburn?
Will Maggie Smith follow in the footsteps of Katharine Hepburn and win an Oscar decades after her last victories? In her new film "The Lady in the Van," Smith plays the real-life Mary Shepherd, a homeless woman who moved her van into the driveway of writer Alan Bennett (Alex Jennings) and stayed there for 15 years. -Break- Subscribe to Gold Derby Breaking News Alerts & Experts’ Latest Oscar Predictions Hepburn claimed her record fourth Best Actress Oscar for her performance as Ethel Thayer in the heartwarming "On Golden Pond" in 1981. She had won her first in 1933 for "Morning Glory" and then back-to-back in the late 1960s ("Guess Who Coming to Dinner," 1967; "The Lion in Winter," 1968); However, in the 1970s, she had only headlined two films ("A Delicate Balance," 1973) and "Rooster Cogburn" (1975). The latter of those paired her with one screen legend, John Wayne, for the fir...
See full article at Gold Derby »

Crowded October Box Office Adds 'Witch Hunter', 'Paranormal 6', 'Jem' & More 'Jobs'

Crowded October Box Office Adds 'Witch Hunter', 'Paranormal 6', 'Jem' & More 'Jobs'
This weekend sees four new wide releases hitting theaters, plus the nationwide expansion of Steve Jobs, all on the heels of last weekend's four new releases, making for an October box office bottleneck. Goosebumps looks like a solid holdover, hoping to repeat at #1. In its way is The Last Witch Hunter, which should top the weekend, taking advantage of the timeframe and Vin Diesel's Furious fame. Additional new releases include the latest installment in the Paranormal Activity franchise, which finds Paramount taking a shot at a new release strategy while Rock the Kasbah and Jem and the Holograms feast on the scraps. Starting with last weekend's #1, Goosebumps opened with $23.6 million, but more importantly carried an "A" CinemaScore. With Halloween just around the corner and a CinemaScore that suggests positive word of mouth, expect this children's horror to holdover well with a 34% drop and a $15.5 million second weekend. Should The Last Witch Hunter
See full article at Box Office Mojo »

Are superhero movies really set to go the way of the western?

Steven Spielberg believes Batman, Superman, Iron Man et al will soon be sharing a shallow grave with Liberty Valance, Rooster Cogburn and Shane. But do the two genres really compare?

Steven Spielberg believes comic-book films are doomed, at least until they rise once again from the ashes. “Right now the superhero movie is alive and thriving,” he told the Associated Press this week. “We were around when the western died and there will be a time when the superhero movie goes the way of the western. It doesn’t mean there won’t be another occasion where the western comes back and the superhero movie some day returns. I’m only saying that these cycles have a finite time in popular culture. There will come a day when the mythological stories are supplanted by some other genre that possibly some young film-maker is just thinking about discovering for all of us.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The 57 Greatest Westerns Ever, Ranked

It's fitting that Clint Eastwood and John Wayne both have the same birthday week. (Wayne, who died in 1979, was born May 26, 1907, while Eastwood turns 85 on May 31). After all, these two all-American actors' careers span the history of that most American of movie genres, the western.

Both iconic actors were top box office draws for decades, both seldom stretched from their familiar personas, and both played macho, conservative cowboy heroes who let their firearms do most of the talking. Each represented one of two very different strains of western, the traditional and the revisionist.

As a birthday present to Hollywood's biggest heroes of the Wild West, here are the top 57 westerns you need to see.

57. 'Meek's Cutoff' (2010)

Indie filmmaker Kelly Reichardt and her frequent leading lady, Michelle Williams, are the talents behind this sparse, docudrama about an 1845 wagon train whose Oregon Trail journey goes horribly awry. It's an intense
See full article at Moviefone »

Time Machine: Oscar Winner-to-Be Bale with Wife on Red Carpet

Christian Bale and wife Sibi Blazic Bale at the Oscars Christian Bale and wife Sibi Blazic on the Academy Awards' Red Carpet Eventual Best Supporting Actor winner Christian Bale and wife Sibi Blazic Bale are seen above on the Red Carpet of the 83rd Academy Awards, held on Feb. 27 at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. The Welsh-born Bale took home the Oscar statuette for his performance as a boxer turned coach and junkie in David O. Russell's boxing drama and sleeper hit The Fighter. His co-stars were Mark Wahlberg (who also co-produced the film), Best Supporting Actress winner Melissa Leo, and Best Supporting Actress nominee Amy Adams. Christian Bale movies The Fighter was Christian Bale's first Academy Award nomination. Among his other movie credits are: The Dark Knight (2008). Director: Christopher Nolan. Cast: Christian Bale. Heath Ledger. Maggie Gyllenhaal. Aaron Eckhart. The Prestige (2006). Director: Christopher Nolan. Cast: Hugh Jackman.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'Chainsaw' Tommy May, Famed Key Grip in Hollywood, Dies at 81

“Chainsaw” Tommy May, who worked on such films as The Greatest Story Ever Told, Rooster Cogburn and Postcards From the Edge as one of the top key grips in Hollywood, has died. He was 81. May died Feb. 23 in his longtime home in Granada Hills, his wife of 57 years, Jody, told The Hollywood Reporter. He had overcome throat cancer in 2004, she said. A strapping former high school and college football player, May earned his nickname for his skill in using a chainsaw to build a camera platform or quickly remove a piece of wall that was in the

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Icons of Fright Interview With Zombie Killers: Elephant’S Graveyard Director B. Harrison Smith

B. Harrison Smith isn’t a fan of how everything has been done regarding the zombie subgenre, and well, he’s right. There’s no danger, no character development, and more often than not, zombie films tend to give fans the same ol’ thing. Smith flat out refused to make a zombie film himself, until the idea of Zombie Killers: Elephant’S Graveyard came his way, and an opportunity to give fans a very character-driven, broad piece of zombie cinema came his way. Icons of Fright recently spoke to Smith about the zombie genre, his film and how important story is to a film. Read on!

How’s it going, Harrison?

Jerry Smith, great last name.

Yeah, I love it, I’m so plain.

Well, it’s a pleasure to talk to you, thanks for reaching out!

Not a problem. First of all, I just wanted to tell you that I really enjoyed your film,
See full article at Icons of Fright »

Jeff Bridges and Nicolas Cage Play Marble-Mouthed Mentors in Seventh Son and Outcast

It wasn’t that long ago that Jeff Bridges and Nicolas Cage were known as Academy Award-winning actors with talent to burn, but time and poor judgement (and in Cage’s case, tax bills) have turned the two into shallow, mumbling shadows of their former selves. Cage has been saying yes to every single offer he receives for a decade or more (seriously, the guy is averaging 2-3 movies per year, and most aren’t even hitting theaters), and Bridges has found himself in an odd rut of variations on True Grit‘s Rooster Cogburn. Seventh Son has had something of a troubled road to theaters — it was originally scheduled to release in February of 2013 — and now that it’s finally here you’d be hard-pressed to believe the delays added much to the final project. The hero is bland, the story plays out exactly as you’d expect and the action sequences are rarely all that
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

'Seventh Son' (2015) Movie Review

Seventh Son is the Chicken McNugget of movies. You know there are better options out there when it comes to your chicken-eating selections, but something about the greasy simplicity and drive thru nature of the McNugget calls to you. Before you take a bite you know what you're going to get and to hide the actual taste of the nugget you drench it in a dipping sauce. As your teeth crack the crisp (if it just came out of the frier) outer shell and squish through the processed meat inside, your mouth is covered with a viscous layer of... something, preventing the taste from leaving your mouth long after you've swallowed. In an effort to fix this you take another bite, this time dipped in even more sauce, but the result is the same. The McNugget is a mirage. It isn't chicken and no amount of sauce is going to
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »
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