7.6/10
15,493
108 user 110 critic

Professione: reporter (1975)

PG-13 | | Drama, Thriller | 9 April 1975 (USA)
A frustrated war correspondent, unable to find the war he's been asked to cover, takes the risky path of co-opting the I.D. of a dead arms dealer acquaintance.

Writers:

(original story), (screenplay) | 2 more credits »

On Disc

at Amazon

5 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Blow-Up (1966)
Crime | Drama | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

A mod London photographer finds something very suspicious in the shots he has taken of a mysterious beauty in a desolate park.

Director: Michelangelo Antonioni
Stars: David Hemmings, Vanessa Redgrave, Sarah Miles
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

An epic portrait of late Sixties America, as seen through the portrayal of two of its children: anthropology student Daria (who's helping a property developer build a village in the Los ... See full summary »

Director: Michelangelo Antonioni
Stars: Mark Frechette, Daria Halprin, Paul Fix
La Notte (1961)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

A day in the life of an unfaithful married couple and their steadily deteriorating relationship.

Director: Michelangelo Antonioni
Stars: Jeanne Moreau, Marcello Mastroianni, Monica Vitti
L'Avventura (1960)
Drama | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

A woman disappears during a Mediterranean boating trip. During the search, her lover and her best friend become attracted to each other.

Director: Michelangelo Antonioni
Stars: Gabriele Ferzetti, Monica Vitti, Lea Massari
Red Desert (1964)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

In a bleak rundown industrial area a young woman, Giuliana, tries to cope with life. She's married to Ugo the manager of a local plant but is soon having an affair with one of his ... See full summary »

Director: Michelangelo Antonioni
Stars: Monica Vitti, Richard Harris, Carlo Chionetti
L'Eclisse (1962)
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

A young woman meets a vital young man, but their love affair is doomed because of the man's materialistic nature.

Director: Michelangelo Antonioni
Stars: Monica Vitti, Alain Delon, Francisco Rabal
Il Grido (1957)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

A man wanders aimlessly, away from his town, away from the woman he loved, emotionally and socially inactive.

Director: Michelangelo Antonioni
Stars: Steve Cochran, Alida Valli, Betsy Blair
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
...
Rachel
...
Knight
...
Stephen
Ambroise Bia ...
Achebe
José María Caffarel ...
Hotel Keeper (as Jose Maria Caffarel)
James Campbell ...
Witch doctor
Manfred Spies ...
German stranger
Jean-Baptiste Tiemele ...
Murderer (as Jean Baptiste Tiemele)
Ángel del Pozo ...
Police inspector (as Angel Del Pozo)
Charles Mulvehill ...
Robertson (as Chuck Mulvehill)
Edit

Storyline

A journalist researching a documentary in the Sahara Desert meets a gunrunner who dies suddenly. When the journalist notices that they have a similar appearance, he assumes the recently deceased's identity and accepts the consequences that it brings. Written by MuzikJunky

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

I used to be somebody else...but I traded him in.

Genres:

Drama | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some violence, nudity and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

| |

Language:

| | |

Release Date:

9 April 1975 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Beruf: Reporter  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$24,157 (USA) (28 October 2005)

Gross:

$619,744 (USA) (10 March 2006)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

In the scene where Jack Nicholson's character lies down in an orange grove, the oranges weren't orange enough and had to be painted. See more »

Quotes

The Girl: People disappear every day.
David Locke: Every time they leave the room.
See more »

Connections

Featured in Z Channel: A Magnificent Obsession (2004) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
The Two Locke's
1 May 2008 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

We join David Locke (Jack Nicholson) at a particularly low point in his life. He is alone in the wilderness, lost and frustrated. Unhappy with his life, he discovers the corpse of a fellow hotel guest and promptly decides to take on the guy's identity.

"I'd like to enquire about flights," Locke asks a hotel clerk. He seeks to escape his past. Later in the film, as he rides a cable cart, Locke spreads his arms and soars like a bird. He's flying, finally enjoying a brief moment of freedom.

The theme of identity, and Locke's name itself, immediately recalls the writings of English philosopher John Locke. Locke believed in the concept of the "tabula rasa" or blank slate. He believed that it was our experiences that defined us as people and that the only way to escape who we are is to effectively erase our history and cut ourselves off from experiences.

Throughout his writings, Locke emphasised the individual's freedom to author his or her own soul. Each individual was free to define his character, but his basic identity as a member of the human species could not be altered. So Locke had two ideas at war. Firstly the belief that the individual was free to author his own life, and secondly the belief that human nature is rigid and unchangeable. It is from this presumption of a free, self authored mind, combined with a sense of rigid human nature, that the Lockean doctrine of "natural" rights is derived.

In Antonioni's film, Nicholson articulates these ideas himself. He is trapped between wanting to be free and having to fulfil duties/roles/tasks embedded in the new persona he has acquired. While responding to a comment that all PLACES are the same, he even argues that it's actually the PEOPLE that are the same. That everyone conforms to specific cultural archetypes. The film's original title, "Profession: Reporter", highlights this point best.

Nicholson's character is desperate to escape this. Like his character in "Five Easy Pieces", he wants some unmappable freedom. He wants to be an individual. Beyond this, though, he wants to stay blank. In what is perhaps the film's most joyous moment, a female character asks Locke what he's running from. He tells her to turn her back to the front of the car. What occurs next is an instant of spontaneous elation and giddy happiness, as she watches the road rush away behind them.

But what people fail to notice during this scene, is that she is in fact watching the past. By facing her previous experiences (which Locke refuses to do) she is happy. Happiness comes from her memories and past encounters, while Locke is miserable simply because he refuses to acknowledge his past experiences.

Throughout the film Locke is asked whether he thinks "the landscape" is beautiful. Once he answers "no", another time he absent mindedly answers "yes", but Antonioni stresses that Locke is really not paying attention. Locke intentionally avoids absorbing beauty or new experiences in an effort to remain in a constant state of rebirth.

These themes are culminated in a brilliant "blind man" story towards the end of the film. Locke, a journalist who specialises in seeing and recording the truth, is painfully attuned to what he calls the "dirt" of the world. As such, he chooses to remain blind. A blank slate.

Antonioni is particularly good at endings and the final shot of "The Passenger" really elevates the whole film. Like the dead man, whose identity he took on, Locke dies alone and face down in a bed. His ex wife pops up and states that she never knew him, but nobody seems to care.

9/10- A great film, worth two viewings. It captures a profound sense of isolation and sadness. Antonioni's camera seems to capture the immense tiredness of the body. Rather than portray experiences, he shows what remains of past experiences. He shows what comes afterwards, when everything has been said. The middle portion of the film is slow and seems to be lacking some sort of superficial drama, but things build nicely and the final payoff well is worth the wait.


18 of 21 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
Over-rated pretentious piece of boring crap freakyfelix
The Ending millhouse8
a great movie let down by schneider's performance? Hudsucker111
Re: Execution Video djones180-1
The girl set him up? NickScale
Anyone else obsessed with Maria Schneider? victorthevictorious
Discuss Professione: reporter (1975) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?