7.2/10
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63 user 48 critic

Night Moves (1975)

Los Angeles private detective Harry Moseby is hired by a client to find her runaway teenage daughter and he stumbles upon a case of murder and artifact smuggling.

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ON DISC
Nominated for 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Joey Ziegler
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Nick
Janet Ward ...
Arlene Iverson
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Anthony Costello ...
Marv Ellman
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Tom Iverson
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Ben Archibek ...
Charles
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Boy in Bar
C.J. Hincks ...
Girl in Bar
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Stud (as Maxwell Gail Jr.)
Susan Barrister ...
Ticket Clerk
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Storyline

Private detective and former football player Harry Moseby gets hired on to what seems a standard missing person case, as a former Hollywood actress whose only major roles came thanks to being married to a studio mogul wants Moseby to find and return her daughter. Harry travels to Florida to find her, but he begins to see a connection between the runaway girl, the world of Hollywood stuntmen, and a suspicious mechanic when an unsolved murder comes to light. Written by Gary Dickerson <slug@mail.utexas.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

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Maybe he would find the girl... maybe he would find himself. See more »


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

30 August 1975 (Italy)  »

Also Known As:

The Dark Tower  »

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(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The name of Tom's fishing boat was the "Point of View" and its dock station was the port of "Gulf Shores, Florida". See more »

Goofs

Harry rents a car when he is in Florida. When the car is filmed either from the front or the back, the car has a rear view mirror. When the car is filmed from the side, the rear view mirror is missing. See more »

Quotes

Arlene Iverson: Are you the kind of detective who, once you get on a case nothing can get you off it? Bribes, beatings, the allure of a woman...
Harry Moseby: That was true in the old days. Before we had a union.
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Connections

Referenced in Knight Moves (1992) See more »

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User Reviews

Imbroglio thriller still resonates.
17 November 2002 | by (Australia) – See all my reviews

Coming back to NIGHT MOVES a quarter of a century later is a confronting experience. I was admirer of Alan Sharp's (HIRED HAND and LAST RUN) and now it's easier to see how he'd distorted the American crime movie with the influence of the European art cinema. Much the same thing is happening in Sam Mendes' current films.

The process is knowing and resonant and the film shows Arthur Penn at the top of his game, though it didn't find the same public his most famous work. This dark intrigue stuff works, partly because it's too dense to be immediately absorbed and because the characters are so vivid - even if it is hard to believe that all these great women want to take off their shirts for Gene Hackman in his tan rug. It is however one of Hackman's best outings - whether he liked it or not.

Lots of great detail - the contrast between Hackman's study with the black and white TV where sports will kill his eyes and Yullin's tasteful home, which makes us share Hackman's loathing of the character, feeding dolphins, the glass bottom boat or the theatre viewing (which respects the different format of the two cameras for once.) The performances are consistently vivid, reflecting well on Penn, with soon to be stars Griffith (particularly memorable) and Woods running level with largely forgotten character people. Janet Ward, for one, really registers.

Even if it needs theatrical viewing to be appreciated, Bruce Surtees' dim lighting, characteristically shading eyes, is atmospheric but the post "New Wave" fad of dispensing with establishing shots and opticals is now confusing and jerky. The score irritates too.

The line about paint drying has now passed into common usage but I like "blind, Albino, s**t-eating alligators" as much.

I used to use this one to teach screen writing decades back. I rate that a good call.


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