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Connie Sawyer, Hollywood's Oldest Working Actress, Dies at 105

Connie Sawyer, Hollywood's Oldest Working Actress, Dies at 105
Connie Sawyer, the oldest working member of the Screen Actors Guild and the Academy, has died. She was 105.

The actress died peacefully at her home in Woodland Hills, California, according to Deadline. She had previously resided at the Motion Picture & Television Fund’s residential community for entertainment industry retirees in Los Angeles.

A rep for Sawyer did not immediately respond to a request for comment from People.

The Pueblo, Colorado, native, who was born on November 27, 1912, made audiences laugh since before the television was even invented, first starring in vaudeville shows when she was just a child.

She later landed
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Hollywood Studios' First Gay Romantic Drama Back on the Big Screen

'Making Love': Groundbreaking romantic gay drama returns to the big screen As part of its Anniversary Classics series, Laemmle Theaters will be presenting Arthur Hiller's groundbreaking 1982 romantic drama Making Love, the first U.S. movie distributed by a major studio that focused on a romantic gay relationship. Michael Ontkean, Harry Hamlin, and Kate Jackson star. The 35th Anniversary Screening of Making Love will be held on Saturday, June 24 – it's Gay Pride month, after all – at 7:30 p.m. at the Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre on Wilshire Blvd. in Beverly Hills. The movie will be followed by a Q&A session with Harry Hamlin, screenwriter Barry Sandler, and author A. Scott Berg, who wrote the “story” on which the film is based. 'Making Love' & What lies beneath In this 20th Century Fox release – Sherry Lansing was the studio head at the time – Michael Ontkean plays a
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Abe Vigoda‬ Passes Away at 94

"The Godfather" star Abe Vigoda‬ has died, aged 94.

The character actor passed away in his sleep at his home in New Jersey on Tuesday morning (January 26), his daughter Carol Vigoda Fuchs tells The Associated Press.

The Brooklyn, New York native began acting in the theatre as a teen and went on to establish himself with parts in Broadway productions of Marat/Sade, The Man in the Glass Booth, Inquest, and Tough to Get Help.

However, his breakout role came after he was cast as veteran mobster Salvatore Tessio in Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather in 1972.

He also featured in a flashback sequence at the end of The Godfather Part II, and later became known for his portrayal of Detective Sergeant Phil Fish on 1970s sitcom Barney Miller and its spin-off series, Fish.

Vigoda's other film credits include Cannonball Run II, Look Who's Talking, and Joe Versus the Volcano.
See full article at GossipCenter »

'Godfather' Star Abe Vigoda Passes Away at Age 94

'Godfather' Star Abe Vigoda Passes Away at Age 94
While we aren't even one month into 2016, the entertainment industry has already lost several notable icons. Today, Variety reports that beloved character actor Abe Vigoda passed away in his New Jersey home at the age of 94. The news was confirmed by his daughter, Carol Vigoda Fuchs, who revealed he passed from natural causes.

Abe Vigoda was born February 24, 1921 in New York City, to Lena (Moses) and Samuel Vigoda, both Russian Jewish immigrants. His father was a tailor on the Lower East Side. The actor made his first stage appearance at the age of 17 and performed n small theater shows for over 20 years. He had roles in notable off-Broadway productions such as "Richard III" in 1960 and 1961, "The Cherry Orchard" in 1962-63, "A Darker Flower" in 1963 and "The Cat and the Canary" in 1965. The actor made his Broadway debut with a role in a revival of "The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul
See full article at MovieWeb »

Abe Vigoda, ‘Barney Miller’ and ‘Godfather’ Actor, Dies at 94

Abe Vigoda, ‘Barney Miller’ and ‘Godfather’ Actor, Dies at 94
Actor Abe Vigoda, best known for his roles as mobster Tessio in “The Godfather” and as Detective Sgt. Fish in TV’s “Barney Miller” and a spinoff series in which he starred, has died. He was 94 and died in New Jersey of natural causes, his daughter, Carol Vigoda Fuchs told the Associated Press.

The tall character actor with the characteristically slouched shoulders and hangdog face became something of a pop culture figure due to repeated false reports of his demise, which became the subject of jokes. Reflecting his somewhat odd celebrity was the existence of a punk rock band named Abe Vigoda; his recurring appearances in the late 2000s on “Late Night With Conan O’Brien”; and the existence of a website named Isabevigodadead.com, which for years consisted simply of a blank page with the word No.

Vigoda made his feature debut in a bit part in Marcel Carne
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Abe Vigoda, ‘Barney Miller’ and ‘Godfather’ Actor, Dies at 94

Abe Vigoda, ‘Barney Miller’ and ‘Godfather’ Actor, Dies at 94
Actor Abe Vigoda, best known for his roles as mobster Tessio in “The Godfather” and as Detective Sgt. Fish in TV’s “Barney Miller” and a spinoff series in which he starred, has died. He was 94 and died in New Jersey of natural causes, his daughter, Carol Vigoda Fuchs told the Associated Press.

The tall character actor with the characteristically slouched shoulders and hangdog face became something of a pop culture figure due to repeated false reports of his demise, which became the subject of jokes. Reflecting his somewhat odd celebrity was the existence of a punk rock band named Abe Vigoda; his recurring appearances in the late 2000s on “Late Night With Conan O’Brien”; and the existence of a website named Isabevigodadead.com, which for years consisted simply of a blank page with the word No.

Vigoda made his feature debut in a bit part in Marcel Carne
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Review: "Figures In A Landscape" (1970) Starring Robert Shaw And Malcolm McDowell; Kino Lorber Blu-ray Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

I've long had admiration for the work of actor Robert Shaw ever since he impressed me at age 8 with his chilling interpretation of the Spectre psychotic killer Red Grant in "From Russia With Love". Shaw could always be counted on to deliver a fine performance even if the material he chose was sometimes underwhelming. Shaw was also a talented writer and playwright, having won acclaim for his play "The Man in the Glass Booth", which was inspired by the war criminal trial of Adolf Eichmann. Shaw, like many actors, participated in many questionable films in order to enable his real passion, which was to bring avante garde movie projects to fruition, even if they only appealed to the art cinema crowd. One of Shaw's most interesting vehicles is one of his least seen. "Figures in a Landscape" was his 1970 adaptation of an allegorical novel by Barry England
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Maximilian Schell obituary

Actor and director who brought dark good looks and a commanding presence to his roles

Austrian by birth, Swiss by circumstance and international by reputation, Maximilian Schell, who has died aged 83, was a distinguished actor, director, writer and producer. However, he will be best remembered as an actor, especially for his Oscar-winning performance in Stanley Kramer's Judgment at Nuremberg (1961) – an early highlight among scores of television and movie appearances. He also directed opera, worked tirelessly in the theatre and made six feature films, including Marlene (1984) - a tantalising portrait of Dietrich, his co-star in Judgment, who is heard being interviewed but not seen, except in movie extracts.

Schell courted controversy and much of his work, including The Pedestrian (1973), dealt with the second world war, its attendant crimes and the notion of collective guilt. In 1990, when he was offered a special award for his contributions to German film, he refused to accept it.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Maximilian Schell obituary

Actor and director who brought dark good looks and a commanding presence to his roles

Austrian by birth, Swiss by circumstance and international by reputation, Maximilian Schell, who has died aged 83, was a distinguished actor, director, writer and producer. However, he will be best remembered as an actor, especially for his Oscar-winning performance in Stanley Kramer's Judgment at Nuremberg (1961) – an early highlight among scores of television and movie appearances. He also directed opera, worked tirelessly in the theatre and made six feature films, including Marlene (1984) - a tantalising portrait of Dietrich, his co-star in Judgment, who is heard being interviewed but not seen, except in movie extracts.

Schell courted controversy and much of his work, including The Pedestrian (1973), dealt with the second world war, its attendant crimes and the notion of collective guilt. In 1990, when he was offered a special award for his contributions to German film, he refused to accept it.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Oscar Winner Maximillian Schell Dead At Age 83

  • CinemaRetro
 

Schell with Brando in The Young Lions.

Oscar-winning Austrian actor Maximillian Schell has passed away at the age of 83. Schell made his English language screen debut opposite Marlon Brando in the WWII film The Young Lions in 1958. Three years later he won the Best Actor Oscar for his performance in Stanley Kramer's Judgment at Nuremberg. Schell played an attorney burdened with the thankless task of defending Nazi war criminals. The character, while repelled by the acts some individuals committed, offered a spirited defense that brought nuance to the circumstances in which National Socialism had arisen. The intelligent depiction of this sensitive subject- and Schell's impassioned performance- was praised internationally. Schell continued to be a leading man in high profile film productions including Tokapi, CounterpointKrakatoa: East of Java, The Odessa File, A Bridge Too Far, The Freshman, The Chosen and Deep Impact. He was nominated for Oscars two other
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Academy award-winning star Maximilian Schell dies at 83

Academy award-winning star Maximilian Schell dies at 83
Johannesburg, Feb 2: Maximilian Schell, who had won an Oscar for his role in 'Judgment at Nuremberg' in 1961, has passed away "following a sudden and serious illness". He was 83.

The Austrian-born actor's agent said that he died overnight at a hospital in Innsbruck, News24 reported.

Schell, who was a fugitive from Adolf Hitler, had received two Academy Award nominations for 'The Man in the Glass Booth' and 'Julia'.

He had also won a Golden Globe for 'The Pedestrian'. (Ani)
See full article at RealBollywood »

Schell as Director: Three Academy Award Nominations for His Films

Maximilian Schell movie director (photo: Maximilian Schell and Maria Schell) (See previous post: “Maximilian Schell Dies: Best Actor Oscar Winner for ‘Judgment at Nuremberg.’”) Maximilian Schell’s first film as a director was the 1970 (dubbed) German-language release First Love / Erste Liebe, adapted from Igor Turgenev’s novella, and starring Englishman John Moulder-Brown, Frenchwoman Dominique Sanda, and Schell in this tale about a doomed love affair in Czarist Russia. Italian Valentina Cortese and British Marius Goring provided support. Directed by a former Best Actor Oscar winner, First Love, a movie that could just as easily have been dubbed into Swedish or Swahili (or English), ended up nominated for the Best Foreign Language Film Academy Award. Three years later, nominated in that same category was Schell’s second feature film as a director, The Pedestrian / Der Fußgänger, in which a car accident forces a German businessman to delve deep into his past.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Earliest Best Actor Oscar Winner Has Died

Maximilian Schell dead at 83: Best Actor Oscar winner for ‘Judgment at Nuremberg’ (photo: Maximilian Schell ca. 1960) Actor and filmmaker Maximilian Schell, best known for his Oscar-winning performance as the defense attorney in Stanley Kramer’s 1961 political drama Judgment at Nuremberg died at a hospital in Innsbruck, Austria, on February 1, 2014. According to his agent, Patricia Baumbauer, Schell died overnight following a "sudden and serious illness." Maximilian Schell was 83. Born on December 8, 1930, in Vienna, Maximilian Schell was the younger brother of future actor Carl Schell and Maria Schell, who would become an international film star in the 1950s (The Last Bridge, Gervaise, The Hanging Tree). Immy Schell, who would be featured in several television and film productions from the mid-’50s to the early ’90s, was born in 1935. Following Nazi Germany’s annexation of Austria in 1938, Schell’s parents, Swiss playwright Hermann Ferdinand Schell and Austrian stage actress Margarete Schell Noé,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Actor Maximilian Schell dies aged 83

Austrian who won best actor Oscar for role in Judgment at Nuremberg died at clinic in Innsbruck after sudden illness

Austrian actor Maximilian Schell, who won an Academy award for his role as a German defence attorney in the acclaimed 1961 courtroom drama Judgment at Nuremberg, has died aged 83.

The Vienna-born actor died overnight at a clinic in Innsbruck as the result of a "sudden and serious illness", his agent, Patricia Baumbauer, told the Austria Press Agency on Saturday.

One of the best-known foreign actors in Us films, Schell starred on stage and screen on both sides of the Atlantic after growing up in Switzerland, where his family settled to escape the Nazis after Germany's 1938 annexation of Austria.

The brother of actress Maria Schell, he also won a Golden Globe and New York Film Critics Circle award for his role in Judgment at Nuremberg, which followed a television drama version of the play.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Academy Award Winner Maximilian Schell Dies at 83

The AP is reporting that Austrian-born actor Maximilian Schell, a fugitive from Adolf Hitler who became a Hollywood favorite and won an Oscar for his role as a defense attorney in “Judgment at Nuremberg,” has died. He was 83.

Schell’s agent, Patricia Baumbauer, said Saturday he died overnight at a hospital in the Austrian city of Innsbruck following a “sudden illness.”

It was only his second Hollywood role, as defense attorney Hans Rolfe in Stanley Kramer’s classic “Judgment at Nuremberg,” that earned him wide international acclaim. Schell’s impassioned but unsuccessful defense of four Nazi judges on trial for sentencing innocent victims to death won him the 1961 Academy Award for best actor. Schell had first played Rolfe in a 1959 episode of the television program “Playhouse 90.”

Despite being type-cast for numerous Nazi-era films, Schell’s acting performances in the mid-1970s also won him renewed popular acclaim, earning him
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Rest in Peace: Oscar Winner and Former Phantom of the Opera Maximilian Schell

One of the greats has left us, and we'd be remiss to not mention the passing of Oscar winner Maximilian Schell this morning (Feb. 1, 2014) at the age of 83 in Innsbruck, Tyrol, Austria. He didn't dabble in the horror genre often, but when he did, it was memorable.

Per the AP via ABC News, Schell's agent, Patricia Baumbauer, said Saturday he died overnight at a hospital in the Austrian city of Innsbruck following a "sudden illness."

Austrian-born Schell won his Best Actor Oscar in 1962 for Judgment at Nuremberg (1961) and also appeared in such genre fare as Deep Impact, The Black Hole, John Carpenter's Vampires, The Vampyre Wars, Darkness, House of the Sleeping Beauties, The Eighteenth Angel, and 1983 TV movie "The Phantom of the Opera," in which he played The Phantom opposite Jane Seymour and Michael York.

Despite being type-cast for numerous Nazi-era films, Schell's acting performances in the mid-1970s won him renewed popular acclaim,
See full article at Dread Central »

Oscar winner Maximilian Schell dies, aged 83

Oscar winner Maximilian Schell dies, aged 83
Oscar-winning actor Maximilian Schell has died at the age of 83.

The actor and director passed away overnight at a hospital in Innsbruck, Austria following a "sudden and serious illness", his agent Patricia Baumbauer confirmed to the Austria Press Agency.

Schell - who was a fugitive from Adolf Hitler - won an Oscar for his performance in Judgment at Nuremberg, in which he played a defence attorney. The 1961 film was only his second role in Hollywood.

He also starred as Dr Hans Reinhardt in Disney's The Black Hole in 1979, and scored two further Oscar nominations for his roles in The Man in the Glass Booth and Julia.

As well as acting and directing, Schell was a highly successful concert pianist and conductor, performing with orchestras in Berlin and Vienna.

Schell is survived by his daughter Nastassja Schell, from his 20-year marriage to Natalya Andreychenko.

Watch Maximilian Schell win an Academy Award
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

R.I.P. Maximilian Schell (1930-2014), Watch The Actor Accept His Oscar & Golden Globe Awards

Hollywood has lost a legend today, with Austrian-born actor Maximilian Schell passing away at 83 years old. While the actor's film debut came opposite Marlon Brando and Montgomery Clift in "The Young Lions," it would be his performance in his second movie that would bring him worldwide attention. As the only actor brought over from the Playhouse 90 TV production of "Judgment At Nuremberg" to the feature film version directed by Stanley Kramer, Schell's turn in the iconic film as the defense attorney landed him an Oscar win (he would be nominated twice more for "The Man In The Glass Booth" in 1975 and "Julia" in 1977) and from there, he didn't look back. The actor's work, which spanned both feature films and television, found him appearing in a wide range of roles, including everything from "The Odessa File" and "Topkapi," to "John Carpenter's Vampires" and "Deep Impact," to working with newer auteurs
See full article at The Playlist »

Maximillian Schell (1930-2014)

The most famous Austrian born actor prior to Schwarzenegger, and Oscar's favorite Austrian/Swiss actor ever, died overnight at 83. Maximilian Schell film debut came with the German anti-war film  Kinder, Mütter und ein General (Children, Mother, and the General) but it wasn't long before Hollywood came calling. 

He won a role supposedly through a misunderstanding/accident in the Brando/Clift vehicle Young Lions (1958). Global fame was just a few years away when he co-headlined the mega-star cast of the seminal Oscar Bait giant Judgement at Nuremberg (about Nazi war crime trials) with Hollywood legend Spencer Tracy and they were both were nominated for Best Actor - it's a oft-repeated fallacy of modern Oscar campaigning that people say that splits your vote and prevents you from winning; see also Amadeus. Schell also won the Golden Globe for that film. (As Rhett from Dial M for Movies pointed out on Twitter this morning,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Austrian-born Actor Maximilian Schell Dies at 83

Austrian-born Actor Maximilian Schell Dies at 83
Austrian-born actor Maximilian Schell, a fugitive from Adolf Hitler who became a Hollywood favorite and won an Oscar for his role as a defense attorney in “Judgment at Nuremberg,” has died. He was 83.

Schell’s agent, Patricia Baumbauer, said Saturday he died overnight at a hospital in Innsbruck following a “sudden and serious illness,” the Austria Press Agency reported.

It was only his second Hollywood role, as defense attorney Hans Rolfe in Stanley Kramer’s classic “Judgment at Nuremberg,” that earned him wide international acclaim. Schell’s impassioned but unsuccessful defense of four Nazi judges on trial for sentencing innocent victims to death won him the 1961 Academy Award for best actor. Schell had first played Rolfe in a 1959 episode of the television program “Playhouse 90.”

Despite being type-cast for numerous Nazi-era films, Schell’s acting performances in the mid-1970s also won him renewed popular acclaim, earning him a best
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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