MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Down 10,282 this week

Lisztomania (1975)

6.6
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 6.6/10 from 1,233 users  
Reviews: 25 user | 19 critic

A send-up of the bawdy life of Romantic composer/piano virtuoso Franz Liszt, with ubiquitous phallic imagery and a good portion of the film devoted to Liszt's "friendship" with fellow ... See full summary »

Director:

Writer:

0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 39 titles
created 30 Oct 2011
 
a list of 31 titles
created 18 May 2012
 
a list of 53 titles
created 17 Jun 2012
 
a list of 49 titles
created 4 months ago
 
list image
a list of 27 titles
created 1 week ago
 

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: Lisztomania (1975)

Lisztomania (1975) on IMDb 6.6/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of Lisztomania.

User Polls

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Sara Kestelman ...
Princess Carolyn
...
...
Rick Wakeman ...
Thor
John Justin ...
Count d'Agoult
Fiona Lewis ...
...
Cosima
...
Andrew Reilly ...
David English ...
Captain
Imogen Claire ...
Rikki Howard ...
Countess
David Corti ...
Daniel
Anulka Dziubinska ...
Edit

Storyline

A send-up of the bawdy life of Romantic composer/piano virtuoso Franz Liszt, with ubiquitous phallic imagery and a good portion of the film devoted to Liszt's "friendship" with fellow composer Richard Wagner. The film begins during the time when Franz would give piano performance to a crowd of shrieking teenage fans while maintaining affairs with his (multiple!) mistresses. He eventually seeks Princess Carolyne of St. Petersburg (at her invitation), elopes, and, after their marriage is forbidden by the Pope, he embraces the monastic life as an abbé. Written by Jonathan Dakss <dakss@columbia.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The erotic, exotic electrifying rock fantasy... It out-Tommy's TOMMY.


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

29 January 1976 (Netherlands)  »

Also Known As:

Lisztomania  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(3 channels)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

First film to be encoded with a Dolby Stereo optical soundtrack. See more »

Quotes

Marie d'Agoult: Spare him, Francois! Don't cut off his... genius in it's prime!
Count d'Agoult: Oh, is that what you call it?
See more »

Crazy Credits

Music by Rick Wakeman Assisted by Franz Liszt and Richard Wagner See more »

Connections

Referenced in Z Channel: A Magnificent Obsession (2004) See more »

Soundtracks

Love's dream
Composed by Franz Liszt
Lyrics by Roger Daltrey
Performed by Roger Daltrey
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Gives the word grotesque a whole new meaning.
2 May 2001 | by (Los Angeles, CA) – See all my reviews

I'm a great fan of Ken Russell's films. What I like most about them is the director's ability (and willingness) to totally immerse his productions into whatever mania happens to be the driving force behind its subject. The results are often excellent, occasionally poor. But never have I seen a film that was, at once, so incredibly visionary and God-awful as Lisztomania.

In most Russell films, fantasy takes on an important role in the dramatic narrative. In Lisztomania, the narrative is virtually jettisoned in favor of fantasy, and not to altogether admirable effect.

Still, any motion picture that can give us Richard Wagner portrayed as a Transylvanian vampire who gains musical inspiration by sucking the blood of Franz Liszt deserves points for imaginative hubris.

Ultimately, Lisztomania is less a film than a comic boot pastiche. Its humor is, by turns, dazzling and lead-footed. Compared to THE MUSIC LOVERS (another Russell bio-pic, this time about Tchaikovsky), Lisztomania is, for all it gleeful, lip-smacking gusto, a rather tired affair, largely because it's metaphors are so pedantic and literal-minded.

I should point out, however, that Wagner's third-act transformation (or should I say resurrection) into a machine gun-toting, Frankenstein-Hitler rock star (yes, you read correctly) is a genuinely


7 of 12 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
DVD? RivetGRRL
Filmfantasy TeolYoKNZ
Musical? longshanks_68
Discuss Lisztomania (1975) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?