Based on Gail Sheehy's book, this film chronicles how a reporter for a New York City magazine decided to investigate the city's prostitution industry to find out just who was making all the... See full summary »

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Nominated for 2 Primetime Emmys. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Fran Morrison
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Orin Dietrich
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Wanda
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Swifty
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Dee Dee
Beverly Hope Atkinson ...
Giselle
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Keogh
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Gustavino
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Lester Traube
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Geist
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Harold Levine
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Bus Driver
James Andronica ...
Van Patrolman
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Detective
Clifford A. Pellow ...
Business Suit (as Cliff Pellow)
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Storyline

Based on Gail Sheehy's book, this film chronicles how a reporter for a New York City magazine decided to investigate the city's prostitution industry to find out just who was making all the money. What she found out caused a firestorm of controversy--that many of the city's richest and most powerful families and corporations benefited directly and indirectly from the illegal sex business. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The girls, the cops, the cheap hotels, the twilight world of ... Hustling

Genres:

Drama

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Details

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Release Date:

22 February 1975 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

La storia di Wanda  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Jill Clayburgh found out her agent at the time was actually pushing someone else for the role. She found another agent, got the role and received her first Emmy nomination. See more »

Goofs

When Fran's article is finally published, closeup of magazine cover does not contain a price, date or any other information always found on cover. See more »

Quotes

Fran Morrison: I just don't get it?
Keogh: Get what?
Fran Morrison: The whole logic of law enforcement. You don't arrest the pimps, you don't arrest the johns, you don't touch the owners of these fleabag hotels, but you're going to beat this monolith by busting Wanda and Dee Dee and forty other girls a night and tossing them in the bullpen. If you really wanted to stop illegal racetrack gambling would you put the racehorses in jail?
Keogh: [laughs] Whoever said anything about logic.
See more »

Connections

References The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1974) See more »

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User Reviews

 
"Occupation?" ... "Put down 'secretary'. I'm working for the city."
8 March 2015 | by (las vegas, nv) – See all my reviews

TV-made adaptation of Gail Sheehy's book about the prostitution-overflow in New York City was considered heady stuff in 1975, but time has turned the picture into trivial camp, complete with 'colorful' dialogue ("How can I bust prostitutes on a typewriter with a broken P?" ... "Try W."). Lee Remick plays that warhorse of clichés: the eager magazine writer hoping to get a juicy inside scoop. She befriends a low-class hooker for the sake of her in-depth piece, but the reporter's ultimate loss of innocence rings false within this too-clean scenario. Jill Clayburgh (in platform heels and talking with an artificial Flatbush twang) would have been far more convincing as an upscale Manhattan call-girl; here, pacing the seedy streets in her mini-skirt and fake-fur jacket, she resembles nothing more than the invasion of Hollywood, U.S.A. Some of the location shooting is well-captured, but the movie is a far cry from the gritty expose it clearly means to be; the phoniness of the characters and in the framework of the plot (de rigueur for television movies) sinks nearly all interest in the subject matter. Sheehy (who did not write the teleplay) did work as a consultant on the picture, which fails to explain Clayburgh's 'respectable' makeover at the finale and the interminable bus station farewell scene, which looks like something out of a Ginger Rogers movie.


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