Grey Gardens
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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

9 items from 2014


Best of Fest – Docs: Laura Poitras Racks Up Noms For Citizenfour, Idfa Announces Awards (November 2014)

28 November 2014 9:00 PM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

With year end lists already flooding the interwebs a full month before the actual year’s end, its hard to ignore the fact that awards season is now in full swing. Tons of documentary awards have already been handed out, whether its for Ida (not Pawel Pawlikowski’s gorgeous new film) or for Cinema Eye Honors, there are plenty of worthy films getting their due recognition. Plus, several international festivals have handed out major awards this month, including Idfa, which hosted their awards ceremony just minutes ago. The full roundup is just below:

Dok Leipzig – Germany – October 27th – November 2nd

At the close of the 57th edition of the German documentary festival the Golden Dove Award, the festival’s highest honor, was given to Claudine Bories and Patrice Chagnard’s Rules of the Game, while the Leipziger Ring Film Prize went to Laura Poitras’s Edward Snowden doc Citizenfour, the »

- Jordan M. Smith

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Film Review: ‘Iris’

4 November 2014 7:50 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A joyous celebration of creativity and razor-sharp wit sustained into old age, as evinced by outspoken nonagenarian fashion icon Iris Apfel, “Iris” also offers proof of Albert Maysles’ continued vitality as a documentarian. Doubtless a close collaboration between filmmaker and subject, this character study proves as visually strong as it is verbally compelling. Iris likens assembling the elements of her signature “looks” — eclectic mixes of exotic fabrics and outlandish costume jewelry — to jazz improvisation, and certainly nobody sounds a false note in this thoroughly enjoyable riff, which should charm clotheshorses and nudists alike.

In contrast with Albert and his late brother David Maysles’ famous study of another fashionista, Edie Bouvier Beale in 1975’s “Grey Gardens,” there’s little distance between the way Iris consciously presents herself and the way the camera perceives her.  This is not to deny the considerable compositional and editorial skills deployed to make it appear that »

- Ronnie Scheib

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Nyff 2014: ‘Iris’ – The Meh-est Costume for Today

3 October 2014 3:49 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Iris

Directed by Albert Maysles

USA, 2014

Wearing a dark scarf over her head to shield herself against the bright, Long Island sunlight, Little Edie Beale famously introduced her iconoclastic sense of fashion by calling her outfit “the best costume for today”. In the Maysles brothers’ documentary Grey Gardens, this single clip seems to encapsulate the greatness of that film: performance, style, agelessness. And nearly 40 years later, Albert Maysles returns to a similar, if not the same, kind of subject: Iris Apfel. In Iris, those ideas are explored with a little less than half the vitality that Grey Gardens, but on the plus side it’s a pleasure to watch.

Iris has had her face plastered upon many a magazine cover, she’s had her own jewelry and cosmetics line, and she’s been on Home Shopping Network. Her sense of fashion is, to the uninformed, gaudy and bursting with color, »

- Kyle Turner

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‘Sight & Sound’ releases 50 greatest documentary films list

1 August 2014 1:09 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

As reported over at The Dissolve, highly respected British film magazine Sight & Sound is famous for its list of the greatest films off all time released once every decade. Since 1952, Citizen Kane held the number one spot until Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo dethroned it in the 2012 poll. Now for the first time Sight & Sound has released a list of the 50 greatest documentary films of all time. The list was compiled after polling from over 200 critics and curators and 100 filmmakers, including “John Akomfrah, Michael Apted, Clio Barnard, James Benning, Sophie Fiennes, Amos Gitai, Paul Greengrass, Jose Guerin, Isaac Julien, Asif Kapadia, Sergei Loznitsa, Kevin Macdonald, James Marsh, Joshua Oppenheimer, Anand Patwardhan, Pawel Pawlikowski, Nicolas Philibert, Walter Salles, and James Toback”.

The top 10 are:

Man With A Movie Camera, (Dziga Vertov, 1929) Shoah (Claude Lanzmann, 1985) Sans Soleil, (Chris Marker, 1982) Night And Fog (Alain Resnais, 1955) The Thin Blue Line (Errol Morris, 1989) Chronicle Of A Summer (Jean Rouch & Edgar Morin, »

- Max Molinaro

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Silent film tops documentary poll

1 August 2014 4:44 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

More than 200 critics and 100 filmmakers take part in poll.

Dziga Vertov’s silent film Man with a Movie Camera (1929) has topped Sight & Sound magazine’s first major poll of the world’s best documentaries.

More than 1,000 films were nominated by 200 critics and 100 filmmakers with more than 100 voting for Man with a Movie Camera.

Vertov’s surrealist classic in which a man travels around a city with a camera documenting urban life was shot in Odessa, Kiev and Khadliv.

Vertov also topped the critics’ list of top doc filmmakers while Frederick Wiseman is number one according to his fellow directors.

Participating filmmakers included Kevin Macdonald, Walter Salles, Joshua Oppenheimer, James Toback, Asif Kapadia, Carol Morley and Mark Cousins.

Critics’ Top 10 documentariesMan with a Movie Camera, dir. Dziga Vertov (Ussr 1929) [pictured]Shoah, dir. Claude Lanzmann (France 1985)Sans soleil, dir. Chris Marker (France 1982)Night and Fog, dir. Alain Resnais (France 1955)The Thin Blue Line, dir. [link »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Man with a Movie Camera tops Sight & Sound doc poll

1 August 2014 4:44 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

More than 200 critics and 100 filmmakers take part in poll.

Dziga Vertov’s silent film Man with a Movie Camera (1929) has topped Sight & Sound magazine’s first major poll of the world’s best documentaries.

More than 1,000 films were nominated by 200 critics and 100 filmmakers with more than 100 voting for Man with a Movie Camera.

Vertov’s surrealist classic in which a man travels around a city with a camera documenting urban life was shot in Odessa, Kiev and Khadliv.

Vertov also topped the critics’ list of top doc filmmakers while Frederick Wiseman is number one according to his fellow directors.

Participating filmmakers included Kevin Macdonald, Walter Salles, Joshua Oppenheimer, James Toback, Asif Kapadia, Carol Morley and Mark Cousins.

Critics’ Top 10 documentariesMan with a Movie Camera, dir. Dziga Vertov (Ussr 1929) [pictured]Shoah, dir. Claude Lanzmann (France 1985)Sans soleil, dir. Chris Marker (France 1982)Night and Fog, dir. Alain Resnais (France 1955)The Thin Blue Line, dir. [link »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Albert Maysles: The Hollywood Interview

10 April 2014 4:02 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

Albert Maysles: Gimme Some Truth

By

Alex Simon

I'm sick and tired of hearing things/From uptight, short-sighted, narrow-minded hypocritics/All I want is the truth/Just gimme some truth/I've had enough of reading things/By neurotic, psychotic, pig-headed politicians/All I want is the truth/Just gimme some truth. – John Lennon

Albert and David Maysles are generally regarded as the fathers of the modern American documentary film. Beginning in the early 1960s, their pioneering work with contemporaries such as Robert Drew, Richard Leacock and D.A. Pennebaker helped launch the “Direct Cinema” movement, devoted to capturing real life as closely as possible, in all its unscripted reality. Today, filmmakers like Michael Moore, reality TV and every news magazine on the air and on the web can trace their linage back to the Maysles brothers.

Their three defining features: Salesman (1968), a sobering and often hilarious look at the lives »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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TCM Classic Film Festival to Open with New Restoration of 'Oklahoma!'

13 February 2014 10:32 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Classic musical fans, take note. The 2014 edition of the TCM Classic Film Festival will open with the world premiere of a brand new restoration of Rodgers & Hammerstein’s “Oklahoma!” TCM's go-to host Robert Osborne will introduce the film, with Oscar-winning star Shirley Jones in person. Other recently announced highlights from the upcoming festival include director William Friedkin, who will attend with the U.S. premiere restoration of his now revered cult classic “Sorcerer” (1977); Kim Novak, with “Bell Book and Candle” (1958); actor Ryan O'Neal, who will introduce “Paper Moon” (1973); documentarian Albert Maysles, returning to the fest with “Grey Gardens” (1975);  and three-time Oscar-winning film editor Thelma Schoonmaker (“Raging Bull,” “The Aviator,” “The Departed”), who will participate in a special conversation.And there’s a lot more happening at this year’s fest; full lineup here.Now in its fifth year, the TCM fest runs April 10-13, 2014, in »

- Beth Hanna

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Grey Gardens Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review

9 January 2014 5:58 PM, PST | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Documentaries can be odd beasts.  At their most pure, they are exactly what the word implies, a document of life, no judgement or coloring, just capturing their subjects.  Many, if not most, go well beyond that, structured and designed to further a cause or deliver a point.  The other extreme occurs when the "goal" supersedes the concept of being a documentary altogether, thus venturing into the realm of propaganda.  David and Albert MayslesGrey Gardens is a documentary of the purest form.  Hit the jump for my review of the Criterion Collection Blu-ray of Grey Gardens. Greg Gardens delves into the complex mother-daughter relationship between Big Edith and Little Edie Beale, one-time members of high-society now living in squalor with their cats in their decrepit, disintegrating East Hampton, New York, mansion--the highest of the high dropped shockingly down.  Their relationship is one of love-hate, with Little Edie harboring much resentment »

- Jackson

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

9 items from 2014


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