Grey Gardens
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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

8 items from 2017


Peter Beard, Andy Warhol, Grey Gardens family to feature in doc

21 June 2017 3:33 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Swedish director Göran Hugo Olsson directs project with Sfi backing.

Göran Hugo Olsson (The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975) is working on the feature documentary That Summer, centred on artist Peter Beard and his family of friends, who formed an enormously influential and vibrant creative community in Montauk, Long Island in the 1970s.

The film includes extraordinary footage from a project Beard initiated with Lee Radziwill about her relatives, the Beales of Grey Gardens, predating by years their depiction in the landmark Albert Maysles film Grey Gardens.

Andy Warhol also features in That Summer, and shot some of the newly unearthed footage, as did director Jonas Mekas, with additional cinematography by Maysles and Vincent Fremont.

Olsson and Swedish production company Story join production companies Louverture Films, Thunderbolt Ranch and Final Cut for Real on the project. Tobias Janson, Joslyn Barnes, Nejma Beard and Signe Byrge Sørensen serve as producers, with Beard serving as executive producer alongside Andrea Barron »

- wendy.mitchell@screendaily.com (Wendy Mitchell)

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Peter Beard, Andy Warhol and the Grey Gardens family to feature in archive documentary

21 June 2017 3:33 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Swedish director Göran Hugo Olsson is directing project with Sfi backing.

Göran Hugo Olsson (The Black Power Mixtape) is working on feature documentary That Summer, which will include long-lost archive footage of the stars of the Maysles brothers’ 1975 doc Grey Gardens,

Olsson is reviving a project first initiated by artist Peter Beard, which chronicles his family of friends and creative collaborators in Montauk, Long Island in the 1970s.

Beard set up the project with Lee Radziwill, a relative of eccentric duo Edith Ewing Bouvier Beale (Big Edie) and Edith Bouvier Beale (Little Eddie), who were depicted in Grey Gardens and its 2006 follow-up The Beales Of Grey Gardens, which featured previously unused footage shot by the Maysles.

Andy Warhol also features in That Summer, and shot some of the newly-unearthed footage, as did director Jonas Mekas, with additional cinematography by Albert Maysles and Vincent Fremont.

Olsson and Swedish production company Story have rights to use footage.

The film is »

- wendy.mitchell@screendaily.com (Wendy Mitchell)

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'Grey Gardens' family, Andy Warhol to feature in archive documentary

21 June 2017 3:33 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Swedish director Göran Hugo Olsson is directing project with Sfi backing.

Göran Hugo Olsson (The Black Power Mixtape) is working on feature documentary That Summer, which will include long-lost archive footage of the stars of the Maysles brothers’ 1975 doc Grey Gardens,

Olsson is reviving a project first initiated by artist Peter Beard, which chronicles his family of friends and creative collaborators in Montauk, Long Island in the 1970s.

Beard set up the project with Lee Radziwill, a relative of eccentric duo Edith Ewing Bouvier Beale (Big Edie) and Edith Bouvier Beale (Little Eddie), who were depicted in Grey Gardens and »

- wendy.mitchell@screendaily.com (Wendy Mitchell)

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Movie Review: A late legend of documentary film spends his swan song with Americans In Transit

20 June 2017 10:00 PM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

For those who believe that death represents a journey from one plane of existence to another, it will seem apropos that the final feature directed by the late and legendary documentary filmmaker Albert Maysles, made when he was nearly 90 years old, takes place entirely on a cross-country train. In Transit, on which Maysles collaborated with four other directors, can’t compare to the pioneering Direct Cinema docs he made with his brother, David (who died in 1987)—such classics as Salesman (1969), Gimme Shelter (1970), and Grey Gardens (1975). But it’s very much of a piece with Maysles’ lifelong commitment to capturing reality on the fly, offering a vivid cross-section of regular folks who all happen to be aboard the Empire Builder, an Amtrak train that makes a three-day journey between Chicago and the Pacific Northwest. The film’s ideal audience is people who, riding public transportation, would »

- Mike D'Angelo

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‘Documentary Now!’: The Secrets to Recreating Film History the Right Way

7 June 2017 2:30 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

IFC’s “Documentary Now!” has always gone for more than the cheap laugh. While it’s a mockumentary of public-tv programming and the documentaries they feature, the real pleasure lies in watching how it will create homages to great nonfiction filmmaking.

“We really wanted you to be clicking through the channels, landing on our show and thinking that it is a real documentary, and then suddenly say, ‘Hey, hold on for a minute — that’s Fred Armisen, what’s he doing in this documentary?'” said  Alexander Buono, the executive producer who has co-directed and served as cinematographer on every episode of the show’s two seasons.

Buono and his fellow co-director, executive producer Rhys Thomas, started their collaboration on “Saturday Night Live” where every week they were charged with creating send-ups of everything from a suspense drama to a pharmaceutical commercial to a music video.

Read More: How ‘The »

- Chris O'Falt

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Newswire: The Grey Gardens house is up for sale

8 February 2017 7:31 PM, PST | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Grey Gardens might be the worst real-estate ad ever committed to film. Albert and David Maysles cult-favorite documentary shows its titular East Hampton mansion as exactly what it is: a dilapidated, animal-infested hovel in which two women—Jackie Kennedy Onassis relatives Big and Little Edie Beale—practiced their own private brand of sanity, one that had little to do with the outside world. Now you, too, can fashion your private universe to your own personal whims, with Rolling Stone reporting that Grey Gardens is back on the housing market.

The house last changed hands back in 1979, when Little Edie sold it to Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee. A few years ago (before his death in 2014) Bradlee and his wife, journalist Sally Quinn, began renting the home out. Now, it’s officially for sale, with an initial asking price of $19.995 million.

Built in 1897, and extensively renovated ...

»

- William Hughes

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‘Grey Gardens’ Home Goes on Sale for Nearly $20 Million

8 February 2017 4:50 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Ever have the desire to live like Big Edie and Little Edie from “Grey Gardens”? First of all, you should probably rethink your priorities. Secondly, the chance may soon be yours! If you have about $20 million to spare. The East Hampton home featured in the 1975 documentary “Grey Gardens” has gone on the market, according to real estate firm The Corcoran Group. The asking price? $19,995,000. For those who’ve seen the film and wondered why  place that was in such extreme disrepair is going for such a lofty price, rest assured — it’s been renovated. Also Read: Albert Maysles, 'Grey Gardens' Filmmaker, »

- Tim Kenneally

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Sundance 2017 Women Directors: Meet Susan Froemke— “Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman”

18 January 2017 7:02 AM, PST | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

“Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman”

Susan Froemke is a four-time Emmy winner and non-fiction filmmaker with over thirty films to her credit, including Academy Award-nominated HBO documentary film “Lalee’s Kin,” “Grey Gardens,” and “Wagner’s Dream,” which had a U.S. theatrical run before airing on PBS. Froemke recently co-directed “Escape Fire: The Fight To Rescue American Healthcare.” She was formerly principal filmmaker at legendary Maysles Films more than two decades.

“Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman” will premiere at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival on January 20. The film is also directed by John Hoffman. Beth Aala co-directed.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Sf: This documentary tells the story of four men who become unlikely conservationists when they see the natural resources that have sustained their families for five generations become threatened and depleted.

Filmed on the majestic Rocky Mountain Front, the vast Great Plains of Kansas, and in the shining Gulf of Mexico waters, these men, who work the iconic landscapes, formed alliances with friend and foe to save their homeland. It’s a film that captures the enduring frontier spirit of America. It’s a film of hope.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Sf: I read a draft of Miriam Horn’s book, “Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman” and fell in love with her characters. These families, who are descendants of homesteaders, frontiersmen, and fishermen, have fascinating stories that told a history of the United States that I found intriguing.

What I love about making documentaries is that you get invited into people’s lives that are completely different from yours and I thought that by filming these people on these extraordinary landscapes, I might be able to reconnect with some of the great American values.

I wanted to ranch, farm, and fish. I also care deeply about conserving land. These men and their colleagues show how it’s possible for humans and nature to co-exist in beneficial ways. This inspired me and I wanted to bring that inspiration to a wider audience.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Sf: I’m hoping that people will have their faith renewed in the democratic process that built this nation. To see that change is possible, but it only comes when people come together and work for change.

The film shows men with true grit who found consensus within their communities to affect change but it took time — 30 years in some cases — and not giving up is the key.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Sf: Documentary filming on the Gulf of Mexico and on the Rocky Mountain Front was a challenge. These are unforgiving locations. In the Gulf, I shot with Thorsten Thielow who convinced me to let him bring the Movi, which would keep the water’s horizon level so the footage would be smooth and beautiful.

We filmed in a rough sea on a fishing trip — luckily no one got seasick — but it was hard to even keep standing at times. Despite this challenge, the footage looked terrific.

Beth Aala, our co-director, shot with Thielow with the Movi for the packing trip in Montana. They could only bring a very limited amount of gear on mules, as there were no vehicles allowed. It’s the very reason why that area is so stunning — time really stood still on those trails, looking exactly the same for generations.

It was a little bit of choreography to maneuver between the animals on a very narrow trail, alongside those steep canyons. Thielow had to ride backwards on horseback part of the way to get some of the shots you see in the film, which gave the Crary family a big laugh.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Sf: This is a film that we were developing together at The Public Good Projects, a non-profit focused on using media to enlighten audiences about some of our nation’s most complex problems, which John Hoffman was running before he came to Discovery.

We had commenced shooting in all three locations and had put together a sizzle reel. When John started speaking with Rich Ross about joining his team at Discovery, the fact that we had this film in early production was part of those conversations.

When Rich saw the sizzle, he decided that it was a perfect opportunity for Discovery to demonstrate its commitment to telling solution-oriented environmental stories.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at Sundance?

Sf: For a documentary, I think having your film premiere at Sundance changes everything in the life of the film. The important national press is in attendance, programmers for the other film festivals see it with an enthusiastic audience, and most wonderfully, many of your documentary peers get a chance to screen it and spread the good word!

There is no way to underestimate the reach Sundance provides for a film. It’s the best birth a documentary can have.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Sf: The best advice I received when I was just starting out in film was to learn to edit first. If I could learn documentary editing, I’d also be learning how to direct because I would know what I needed to bring back into the edit room. I followed that advice and it’s been invaluable.

I feel lucky that I’ve never received any bad advice.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Sf: First, you need total support while filming so only work with crew members that show respect and are willing to collaborate equally.

Second, follow your intuition. Never doubt it!

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Sf: Some of my favorite women-directed films are

Lina Wertmüller’s “Swept Away,” Sofia Coppola’s “Lost in Translation,” and Kathryn Bigelow’s “The Hurt Locker,” because they are beautifully crafted works of art. But I’m going to write about “Gimme Shelter” and Charlotte Zwerin, who directed the film with David and Albert Maysles.

Zwerin’s name is almost never included when “Gimme Shelter” is written about, but she created the brilliant structure for the film and is responsible for the doc’s “film within the film” concept that’s realized by filming the Rolling Stones in the editing room long after the Altamont concert.

The Maysles Brothers always credited Zwerin as a director, but in the early 70's, it was never honored by the industry. So I want to give a shot out to one of the earliest documentary female directors and honor her work.

W&H: Have you seen opportunities for women filmmakers increase over the last year due to the increased attention paid to the issue? If someone asked you what you thought needed to be done to get women more opportunities to direct, what would be your answer?

Sf: We are fortunate in the documentary world: Women have always been at the forefront of nonfiction film making. It is a wonderful community and continues to thrive through changes in technology and societal issues.

Sundance 2017 Women Directors: Meet Susan Froemke— “Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Joseph Allen

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

8 items from 2017


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