6.8/10
13,979
81 user 45 critic

French Connection II (1975)

R | | Action, Crime, Drama | 21 May 1975 (USA)
"Popeye" Doyle travels to Marseille to find Alain Charnier, the drug smuggler who eluded him in New York.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) | 3 more credits »
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ON DISC
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 2 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Bernard Fresson ...
...
Jacques (as Philippe Leotard)
...
Charles Millot ...
Miletto
Jean-Pierre Castaldi ...
Raoul (as Jean - Pierre Castaldi)
...
'The Old Lady' / The Old Lady
Samantha Llorens ...
Denise
...
Bartender
Reine Prat ...
Young Girl on the Beach
Raoul Delfosse ...
Dutch Captain
Ham-Chau Luong ...
Japanese Captain (as Ham Chau Luong)
Jacques Dynam ...
Inspector Genevoix
Malek Kateb ...
Algerian Chief (as Malek Eddine)
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Storyline

New York narcotics detective Popeye Doyle follows the trail of the French connection smuggling ring to France where he teams up with the gendarmes to hunt down the ringleader. Written by Keith Loh <loh@sfu.ca>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

What happens when you're a N.Y. cop sent to France to bust a dope ring and... You can't speak French. The French cops hate you. Your own people have set you up... YOU EXPLODE! See more »


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

21 May 1975 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Contacto en Francia II  »

Filming Locations:

 »

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Box Office

Budget:

$4,340,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$12,484,444
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Doyle's memorable cry of "Mickey Mantle sucks!" during the cold turkey sequence was the source of much trouble for the film makers and their legal department. Producer Robert L. Rosen had to track down Mickey Mantle to obtain his permission for the reference. After a long phone call, Rosen flew out to Mantle's home in Dallas with a print of the film, which was screened for him and his lawyer. When Gene Hackman uttered the line, Mantle surprised Rosen not only by roaring with laughter but also insisting that they watched the rest of the film because both he and his lawyer were enjoying it so much. Mantle later happily signed a release waiver and the line stayed in the film. See more »

Goofs

In the first bar scene, Popeye Doyle eats an egg that changes from partially eaten to whole again and back again while he tries to talk to the French girls. See more »

Quotes

Jimmy 'Popeye' Doyle: I'll tell you what I found out. I found out that you eat shit, you fucking frog, you! You goddamn scumbag, you!
See more »

Crazy Credits

Opening credits prologue: MARSEILLES See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
Gritty sequel hangs in the balance of being slightly superior
21 January 2003 | by See all my reviews

In this riveting, darkly dramatic sequel, Popeye Doyle (Hackman in one of his most overlooked performances) travels to Marseilles to track the elusive Alain "Frog One" Charnier (Fernando Rey), whom he failed to catch in New York City. Doyle is met with a French detective (Bernard Fresson) who resents his rough approach to case-solving, and a language he can't understand to save his life. In an ugly twist, the rogue detective is kidnapped by Frog One's men and forced to take heroin in a somewhat unsuccessful attempt to find out all he knows about the French Connection case. Successfully humiliated by Charnier, Doyle is put in isolation by the French police and goes through a brutal process of cold-turkey withdrawals from heroin. By now, Popeye is determined to kill the goons who forced him to become an addict. A fresh plot and gritty, realistic direction by John Frankenheimer make "French Connection II" worthy enough to be compared in merit to the original, despite the absence of Roy Scheider as Hackman's partner. Dark and dramatic, further allows depth and insight to Hackman's Popeye Doyle.


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