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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003

1-20 of 22 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


NYC Touts Growth of Biz Employment, Push for Diversity with Film Commission’s 50th Anniversary Celebration

8 June 2016 9:02 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The boom in film and TV lensing during the past 10 years in New York City has been undeniable. Now Mayor Bill de Blasio and film commissioner Julie Menin are honing the focus to ensure that the wealth spreads throughout the city, by promoting what de Blasio called programs “to make this a five-borough industry that reaches every kind of New Yorker.”

De Blasio and Menin, commissioner of the Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment, unveiled Wednesday an initiative to distribute 1,000 free tickets to Broadway shows and another 1,000 movie tickets to residents of public housing in the city. That effort to increase access to the arts is part of a celebration of the 50th anniversary of the founding of what was the Mayor’s Office of Film, Theater and Broadcasting.

To herald New York’s continued push to expand its footprint in media and entertainment, de Blasio and Menin unveiled »

- Cynthia Littleton

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NYC Touts Growth of Biz Employment, Push for Diversity with Film Commission’s 50th Anniversary Celebration

8 June 2016 9:02 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

The boom in film and TV lensing during the past 10 years in New York City has been undeniable. Now Mayor Bill de Blasio and film commissioner Julie Menin are honing the focus to ensure that the wealth spreads throughout the city, by promoting what de Blasio called programs “to make this a five-borough industry that reaches every kind of New Yorker.”

De Blasio and Menin, commissioner of the Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment, unveiled Wednesday an initiative to distribute 1,000 free tickets to Broadway shows and another 1,000 movie tickets to residents of public housing in the city. That effort to increase access to the arts is part of a celebration of the 50th anniversary of the founding of what was the Mayor’s Office of Film, Theater and Broadcasting.

To herald New York’s continued push to expand its footprint in media and entertainment, de Blasio and Menin unveiled »

- Cynthia Littleton

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Money Monster review

30 May 2016 4:09 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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George Clooney stars and Jodie Foster directs: here's our review of Money Monster...

“We don’t do gotcha journalism here,” says TV executive producer Patty Fenn (Julia Roberts) near the beginning of Money Monster, before wearily adding, “We don’t do journalism, period.”

Taking Network and Dog Day Afternoon as reference points, the new film by Jodie Foster uses a straightforward thriller format to examine the loss of trust between the powerful, the powerless and the media in recent times. It's less mischievous about it than Adam McKay's The Big Short, which sustained its articulate rage about the financial crisis to devastating comedic effect, but as the above line suggests, it's also accordingly more multiplex-friendly in its satirical leanings.

Money Monster is the live cable show presented by financial guru Lee Gates (George Clooney), who pitches himself as an entertainer rather than a journalist, much to Patty's frustration. »

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Money Monster: the financial thriller that’ll leave you short-changed

23 May 2016 1:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Jodie Foster’s directing comeback – starring George Clooney and Julia Roberts – wants to sock it to capitalism, but it’s just too smug to take seriously

Money Monster is a thriller made by members of the 10% who truly want to stick it to the 1%. It comes on all Bernie Sanders – it even features a closing quote from Sanders-backer Robert Reich – but really, every frame votes Hillary.

Skilfully directed by Jodie Foster – her first outing since she made, rather ill-fatedly, The Beaver with Mel Gibson – and filled with strong performances from Julia Roberts, George Clooney and Jack O’Connell, its main drawback is a screenplay with too many writers that’s a Frankenstein-monster of off-cuts from liberal 1970s classics such as Dog Day Afternoon, Network and Alan J Pakula’s Rollover (and that’s just for starters...).

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- John Patterson

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Outlander's Catriona Balfe on Why She Took on a Key Role in Money Monster with George Clooney and Julia Roberts

18 May 2016 7:00 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

It's not everyday an actress gets the chance to work with George Clooney, Julia Roberts and Jodie Foster all at the same time. So when Caitriona Balfe was offered the part of a steely publicist for a mysterious financial firm in Money Monster, she jumped at the opportunity. "Obviously the opportunity to work with Jodie and George and Julia was just incredible," the actress, 36, tells People and Entertainment Weekly at Cannes. "So it didn't take any convincing at all," she added. But the film's all-star cast and director weren't the only motivating factors. In fact, Balfe was initially drawn to »

- Michael Miller, @write_miller

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Outlander's Catriona Balfe on Why She Took on a Key Role in Money Monster with George Clooney and Julia Roberts

18 May 2016 7:00 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

It's not everyday an actress gets the chance to work with George Clooney, Julia Roberts and Jodie Foster all at the same time. So when Caitriona Balfe was offered the part of a steely publicist for a mysterious financial firm in Money Monster, she jumped at the opportunity. "Obviously the opportunity to work with Jodie and George and Julia was just incredible," the actress, 36, tells People and Entertainment Weekly at Cannes. "So it didn't take any convincing at all," she added. But the film's all-star cast and director weren't the only motivating factors. In fact, Balfe was initially drawn to »

- Michael Miller, @write_miller

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Review: 'Money Monster' is old-fashioned issue-driven entertainment done well

16 May 2016 4:00 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Sidney Lumet would like Money Monster quite a bit. There was a tradition of filmmaking that seems to be on the wane these days that involved wrapping a social issue or a social injustice and wrapping it in a nice juicy dramatic situation. When done perfectly, you get 12 Angry Men or Dog Day Afternoon or Network. Lumet was so good at both understanding exactly how to frame the moral argument and knowing how to play the entertainment, and it’s a bit of a lost art now. I’ve always felt like the inelegant version of this particular type of storytelling was embodied by Stanley Kramer, who tilted more towards the message end of the equation. It’s a tough thing to get right, and Jodie Foster deserves credit for orchestrating things with a nimble wit and a relentless energy. Ultimately, you probably know where the screenplay credited to Jamie Linden »

- Drew McWeeny

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Money Monster – Review

13 May 2016 4:53 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Money Monster has all the ingredients of a timely thriller: an explosive hostage situation, a critique of our current economic system, and major movie stars in the form of George Clooney and Julia Roberts. However, what unfolds onscreen is a simplistic and obvious expose about the manipulative power of both Wall Street and the media that by now is so familiar that its cynical perspective is unlikely to upset or provoke anyone. Perhaps a decade or two ago Money Monster would have been a compelling film experience but in this day and age it’s just picking obvious targets.

Money Monster stars Julia Roberts as Patty Fenn, a TV producer who spends the entire film in a control room full of consoles, monitors and engineers. Down on the studio floor Clooney plays Lee Gates, the hyperactive host of a show called Money Monster (based not-so-loosely on Jim Cramer’s CNN »

- Tom Stockman

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Cannes Film Review: ‘Money Monster’

12 May 2016 3:45 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

When you break apart the essential elements of “Money Monster,” Jodie Foster’s taut yet sporadically odd hostage drama, few of them seem to completely work. As an indictment of Wall Street chicanery, it’s largely toothless; as a pure thriller, it only quickens the pulse once or twice; as a conspiracy saga, its central mystery falls flat.

Yet somehow the film hangs together surprisingly well, thanks to on-point performances from George Clooney and Julia Roberts, a sprinkle of obtuse humor and Foster’s streamlined direction, which takes style notes from the likes of “Dog Day Afternoon” and “Inside Man” in the service of a far more lightweight confection. It may not linger long in the memory after credits roll, and what multiplex audiences make of the film is anyone’s guess, but in a landscape short on no-frills grown-up entertainment, it’s worth the modest time investment.

The film »

- Andrew Barker

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‘By Sidney Lumet’ Trailer: Docu Revisits ‘Serpico’, ‘Network’ & More – Tribeca Film Festival First Look

30 March 2016 8:59 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Exclusive: Unveiled at Cannes last spring, By Sidney Lumet shows the director, who died in 2011, telling his own story in a never-before-seen interview shot in 2008 and produced by the late Daniel Anker. With candor, humor and grace, Lumet reveals what matters to him as an artist and as a human being. The documentary features clips from Lumet's 44 films made during a career that spanned half a century – including Serpico, Dog Day Afternoon, 12 Angry Men, Network and Before… »

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1950s Film Star Rita Gam Dies at 88

22 March 2016 8:55 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Actress and first wife of famous director Sidney Lumet, Rita Gam has died, according to reports. She was 88. According to the Hollywood Reporter, Gam died from respiratory failure at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles on Tuesday. During her acting career, Gam starred in films like Saadia, Sign of the Pagan and King of Kings. Gam also played the real life role of one of Grace Kelly's bridesmaids when the actress wed Prince Ranier in 1956, THR adds. Aside from her on screen roles, Gam also starred in a handful of stage productions including Wit & Wisdom, Hamlet and There's a Girl in My Soup. »

- Naja Rayne, @najarayne

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1950s Film Star Rita Gam Dies at 88

22 March 2016 8:55 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Actress and first wife of famous director Sidney Lumet, Rita Gam has died, according to reports. She was 88. According to the Hollywood Reporter, Gam died from respiratory failure at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles on Tuesday. During her acting career, Gam starred in films like Saadia, Sign of the Pagan and King of Kings. Gam also played the real life role of one of Grace Kelly's bridesmaids when the actress wed Prince Ranier in 1956, THR adds. Aside from her on screen roles, Gam also starred in a handful of stage productions including Wit & Wisdom, Hamlet and There's a Girl in My Soup. »

- Naja Rayne, @najarayne

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Rita Gam, Former Starlet and Ex-Wife of Sidney Lumet, Dies at 88

22 March 2016 3:49 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Rita Gam, a ’50s film star and founding member of The Actor’s Studio, died Tuesday of respiratory failure in Los Angeles. She was 88. Gam’s credits include “Night People” and “Shoot Out” alongside Gregory Peck, “Hannibal” with Victor Mature and appearances on “The Rockford Files.” Later in life, Gam produced a series on the global film business and a PBS travel show called “World of Beauty.” Gam was the ex-wife of legendary director Sidney Lumet (“12 Angry Men,” “Dog Day Afternoon”), and a close confidant to the late Grace Kelly, for whom she stood as bridesmaid during the “High Society” actress’ 1956 wedding to Prince. »

- Matt Donnelly

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‘Carol’ Leads the Top 30 Lgbt Films of All-Time, According to BFI Poll

15 March 2016 1:01 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Todd Haynes‘ filmography is often overwhelming in its intellectual acumen and emotional devastation,” we noted upon the release of his latest film this past fall. “This is true of Carol, which is at once a return to the deconstruction of femininity, social mores, and mild anarchy of privilege, as well as an honest and heartbreaking story about falling in love and the trepidation therein.” Over 100 film experts, ranging from critics to writers to programmers, agree on the emotional power of the drama, as they’ve voted it the best Lgbt film of all-time.

Conducted by BFI ahead of the 30th BFI Flare: London Lgbt Film Festival, they note this is the “first major critical survey of Lgbt films.” Speaking about leading the poll, Haynes said, “I’m so proud to have Carol voted as the top Lgbt film of all time in this poll launched for the Fest’s 30th edition. »

- Jordan Raup

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Hitch Hike | Blu-ray Review

15 March 2016 7:30 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Raro Video resurrects an exploitation goodie masquerading as another bit of cheap Eurosleaze, Hitch Hike (aka Autostop Rosso Sangue) a 1977 thriller from Italian director Pasquale Festa Campanile. Like a tawdry version of an early Polanski effort, it’s a significant anomaly of its ilk for several reasons, the most notable being its director, usually known as a fixture of 1970’s Italian-style comedy (aka commedia all’italiana). Adapted from the novel The Violence and the Fury by Peter Kern, it’s headlined by Franco Nero, French actress Corinne Clery (the title character from infamous The Story of O, 1975) and grindhouse staple David Hess (The Last House on the Left, 1972), while predictable story elements spiked with moments of brutal violence should be enough to rejuvenate interest in a title not often screened in the Us (despite its initial box office success in Europe).

Walter Mancini (Franco Nero), a bitter, alcoholic journalist, is »

- Nicholas Bell

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A Short History of the Oscars and Cross-Gender Performances

25 February 2016 10:55 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

On Sunday, movie fans will find out if Eddie Redmayne wins Best Actor for his performance as trans woman Lili Elbe in The Danish Girl. Should Redmayne be victorious, he'd not only score back-to-back Oscars but he would also become the latest in a long line of actors who have courted Oscar attention by playing the opposite sex, playing a trans person or in some other way playing a character whose gender differs than the one of which the actors themselves identify. Not that it comes without some criticism, of course. Also up for an Oscar this year is the »

- Drew Mackie, @drewgmackie

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10 Best Picture Oscar Nominees You Might Not Have Heard Of

24 January 2016 3:22 AM, PST | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Orion Pictures

You’d be forgiven for thinking that any film nominated for a hallowed (sense the sarcasm) Best Picture Academy Award would be instantly memorable; this is Hollywood’s top prize, after all. And while it remains that most Best Picture nominees are memorable for one reason or another, it is also true that some have simply slipped from collective cinematic memory.

That’s not to say that they’re necessarily bad films (and indeed the ten on show here range from good to great), but rather that once the Oscar dust had settled, they kind of faded into the background. Nobody forgot them, per se, but remembering them as among the year’s cream of the crop is invariably difficult.

As the category has now been expanded to allow up to ten nominees, these kind of films are becoming more frequent, and you only have to look back »

- Taylor Burns

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Movie News: 'Dog Day Afternoon' Heads to Broadway; Watch Jason Sudeikis in First 'Tumbledown' Trailer

8 January 2016 12:00 PM, PST | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

Dog Day Afternoon: Forty years after its release, Dog Day Afternoon is heading to Broadway. Based on a real-life account of a bank robbery gone wrong and the ensuing hostage drama on a hot summer's day, the 1975 movie starred Al Pacino and John Cazale; it earned writer Frank Pierson an Academy Award. The stage version will be written by Stephen Adly Guirgis, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his play Between Riverside and Crazy. [Deadline]   Jaws: The last remaining shark from Steven Spielberg's Jaws is heading to a museum in Los Angeles. Four models were originally made for the movie, but three were made with latex that deteriorated over the years. The fourth model, made with fiberglass, has been donated to the Academy Museum, which will house the collection of the...

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- Peter Martin

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News Briefs: 'Dog Day Afternoon' Heads to Broadway; Watch First 'Tumbledown' Trailer

7 January 2016 9:46 PM, PST | Fandango | See recent Fandango news »

Dog Day Afternoon: Forty years after its release, Dog Day Afternoon is heading to Broadway. Based on a real-life account of a bank robbery gone wrong and the ensuing hostage drama on a hot summer's day, the 1975 movie starred Al Pacino and John Cazale; it earned writer Frank Pierson an Academy Award. The stage version will be written by Stephen Adly Guirgis, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his play Between Riverside and Crazy. [Deadline]   Jaws: The last remaining shark from...

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- affiliates@fandango.com

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Attica! Attica! Dog Day Afternoon is being groomed for Broadway

7 January 2016 2:57 PM, PST | JoBlo.com | See recent JoBlo news »

Dog Day Afternoon is coming to the Great White Way. Warner Bros. Theatre Ventures has commissioned a stage adaptation of Sidney Lumet's 1975 film for a future run on Browadway, with playwright Stephen Adly Guirgis brought in to work on making that happen. The film, based on a true story, starred Al Pacino and John Cazale as a pair of truly awful bank robbers seeking to score some quick... Read More »

- Billy Donnelly

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003

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