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Breakheart Pass (1975) Poster

Trivia

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Railway scenes were shot on the Camas Prairie Railroad around Lewiston, Idaho.
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Legendary stuntman Yakima Canutt's final movie credit, marking the end of a 55-year career. His first picture had been The Girl Who Dared (1920).
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This movie is notable for a fight scene aboard the train between movie tough guy Charles Bronson and former light heavyweight prizefighter boxing champ turned-actor Archie Moore.
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This movie was first released about a year after Agatha Christie's Murder on the Orient Express (1974), a film it has been likened to.
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The Breakheart Pass is a location in Nevada's Rocky Mountains through which trains must pass in order to get to Fort Humboldt, Nevada.
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The fight scene between Archie Moore and Bronson atop the moving train in a snowstorm was performed without stunt doubles.
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The train seen in this movie was the Great Western Railway 2-8-0 Consolidated Steam Locomotive #75.
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At one point in the film, Nathan Pierce refers to Major Claremont as Colonel, to which Claremont replies "Major." In Alistair MacLean's original novel, Claremont's rank is Colonel.
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Although set in Nevada, the film was actually shot in Idaho.
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This is one of a string of Charles Bronson's 1970s westerns. The others were Chino (1973), Red Sun (1971), Chato's Land (1972), From Noon Till Three (1976), Breakheart Pass (1975) and The White Buffalo (1977).
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Charles Bronson was approximately 53 years old when he made this film.
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This adaptation of an Alistair MacLean paperback page-turner was released between the MacLean filmed-novel adaptations Caravan to Vaccares (1974) and Golden Rendezvous (1977).
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The 19th century locomotive was co-owned by Everett Rohrer, Dr. James R. Arneill and Phil Frish of Denver, Colorado, and was used in several other motion pictures.
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One of many films in which Charles Bronson co-starred with his wife, Jill Ireland.
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Second unit direction was provided by veteran stuntman Yakima Canutt while his son Joe was one of the film's stuntmen.
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Actor Roy Jenson's name is misspelled as Roy Jensen in the end credits.
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Due to certain plot parallels with both Agatha Christie's "Ten Little Indians" and "Murder On The Orient Express", one critic suggested that the movie should have been called "Ten Little Indians On The Orient Express In The West".
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The general US release was Feb 13, 1976. Los Angeles opening was March 10 1976, New York May 7 1976.
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When Jabo (Doug Adkins) is shot and falls face down in the snow, a yellow object can be seen poking out of Doug's back pocket. This object appears to be some sort of snack.
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Actor Robert Tessier (Levi Calhoun) has been dubbed by another actor, quite obvious to those familiar with his work. (See, for example, his other Bronson collaboration Hard Times.)
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Archie Moore was 58 years old when he wrestled atop the train with Charles Bronson, 53 at the time.
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Roy Jenson, Eddie Little Sky and John Mitchum all previously appeared in Paint Your Wagon (1969), but in neither that film nor this do any of them share any screen time.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

The railroad cars that got wrecked were not models or special effects. They were actual railroad cars, purchased used from the Burlington Northern Railroad specifically for the purpose of being destroyed in this film.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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