The Apple Dumpling Gang (1975) - News Poster

News

On this day: Hemingway, Falconetti, Clueless, Dunkirk

On this day in history as it relates to the movies...

Corey Stoll as Hemingway

1892 Maria Falconetti is born. Delivers one of the best performances ever captured on film thirty-six years later in The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928)

1899 Famous author and real 'character' Ernest Hemingway is born. In addition to his work being made into films and TV miniseries he frequently pops up as a character in cinema played by everyone from Chris O'Donnell (In Love and War) to Corey Stoll (Midnight in Paris - robbed of an Oscar nod though we honored him here) and now Dominic West (Genius) ...and that's not even the half of it.

1922 Don Knotts is born. Mugs it up in 70+ film and TV projects including Three's Company, The Apple Dumpling Gang, and The Andy Griffith Show - 5 Emmy wins for Supporting Actor thereafter until his death in 2006

1948 Steven Demetre Georgiu is born in London.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Why 'Bad News Bears' Is the Greatest Baseball Movie Ever Made

Why 'Bad News Bears' Is the Greatest Baseball Movie Ever Made
For folks who loves both baseball and movies, it's incredibly sad that Hollywood's takes on our national pastime continually whiff with a frequency that makes Adam Dunn look like Joe Dimaggio. But 40 years ago today, a film was released that got everything beautifully, hilariously and even painfully right: The Bad News Bears. A tartly-scripted comic saga about a no-hope Little League team from L.A.'s San Fernando Valley, the film — directed by Michael Ritchie from an original screenplay written by Bill Lancaster — shocked and amused audiences with its unbridled
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Ed Catto: The Batman Nobody Knows… Yours

One of the marketing trends today is for consumers to take a brand and make it their own. An example is the phenomenon of customizing phones. I’m sure that just about everyone you know has selected a cellphone case so that their phone has really become their phone. And a few years ago, I had a role in a Kia Soul marketing campaign. The big idea was that you, as a car owner, could customize the Soul in whatever way worked best for you. And there’s more of this brand customization in the future. Centennials, the group that comes after Millennials, are even more passionate about personalizing brands.

Geek Culture’s passionate fans already have their own personalized visions of popular entertainment brands and characters. They are a finicky bunch, especially when it comes to change. Long gone are the days when they blindly accepted reboots or revisions
See full article at Comicmix »

‘Pete’s Dragon’ Remake in the Works

Disney may be the studio behind Pixar, the Marvel Cinematic Universe and the upcoming rebirth of the Star Wars saga. However, the studio also continues to deliver the same kind of entertainment as they did in the 1960s and 1970s, namely live-action comedies and light-hearted adventures for the whole family.

Films like The Apple Dumpling Gang and That Darn Cat brought audiences in for laughs, while Mary Poppins and Bedknobs and Broomsticks wowed them with the combination of animation and live-action. Now it seems that one film from that period of Disney magic is about to be revisited for the modern era.

According to Deadline, Disney is developing a remake/reboot of the 1977 film Pete’s Dragon with David Lowery and writing partner Toby Halbrooks attached to script the film. The original film was a musical about ...

Click to continue reading ‘Pete’s Dragon’ Remake in the Works
See full article at Screen Rant »

Mousterpiece Cinema, Episode 64: ‘The Apple Dumpling Gang’

Don Knotts is well-known and beloved for his role as Barney Fife on The Andy Griffith Show, but was he really just a pervy old uncle in disguise? Well, if you listen to Mike talk about him, you might think so too! Somehow–yes, really–this is a point of discussion in the brand-new episode of Mousterpiece Cinema, where Josh and Mike tackle the 1975 Disney family film The Apple Dumpling Gang. Did this story of kids finding gold in an Old West town charm and delight both of your hosts? Or have the planets aligned once more, leaving Josh to be more negative about a movie than Mike? And what, pray tell, does John Wayne have to do with this goofball family comedy? The only way to know is to listen to the new podcast!

Download the show in a new window

iTunes
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Extended Thoughts on ‘The Apple Dumpling Gang’

The Apple Dumpling Gang

Directed by Norman Tokar

Written by Don Tait

Starring Don Knotts, Tim Conway, Bill Bixby, Susan Clark

Oh, my stupid memory. While I hadn’t exactly built up, in my mind, The Apple Dumpling Gang as a true live-action classic from Walt Disney Pictures, I clearly fooled myself. As I mentioned on the show, I have vague memories of watching this film and its sequel, The Apple Dumpling Gang Rides Again. The more I ponder those memories, the more I realize that I don’t remember the movies themselves so much as the experience of having watched them, renting them on VHS from my local library. I had a glimmer of watching Don Knotts and Tim Conway play bumbling thieves in the Old West…and that’s it. I had hopes for watching the 1975 film, which is apparently Disney’s most successful live-action film of the 1970s (not too shabby,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Odd Life Of Timothy Green – The Review

In creating his entertainment empire, Walt Disney knew that his company needed to branch out beyond animation. Those hand-drawn classics took a long time to craft, so he first produced adventure flicks out of England before his take on Jules Verne, 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea, which was a box office sensation in 1954. Establishing a live-action division, Walt released several family flicks over the next few decades ranging from adventures like Swiss Family Robinson to the kids comedies featuring Herbie, the Love Bug and The Apple Dumpling Gang. Oops, almost forgot the tear-jerkers, those warm family flicks like Follow Me Boys and ( gulp! ) Old Yeller ( I recall a stand-up comic saying that the flick was a test that parents could give their kids-if the kid cried at the end of Yeller, then he was normal ). Many of the movies would be chopped up and turned into multiple episodes of that Sunday night TV staple,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

'Dragnet,' 'M-a-s-h' actor Harry Morgan dies at 96

'Dragnet,' 'M-a-s-h' actor Harry Morgan dies at 96
Harry Morgan never planned to be an actor, yet he spent 10 years on one of the top TV series of all time, made 50 films and appeared on Broadway. He became one of the best-known character actors in Hollywood.

But it was Morgan’s portrayal of the fatherly Col. Sherman Potter on M-a-s-h for which Morgan became most famous, and he knew it.

“M-a-s-h was so damned good,” Morgan told The Associated Press. “I didn’t think they could keep the level so high.”

His wry humor, which helped net him an Emmy for the CBS-tv hit, carried onto the show.
See full article at EW.com - Inside TV »

R.I.P. Harry Morgan

Harry Morgan, a character actor on the stage, screen and TV whose most iconic role was playing Col. Sherman Potter for 10 seasons on M*A*S*H, died Wednesday in Brentwood of complications from pneumonia, the AP reported. He was 96. He was nominated for eight Emmys — including two for directing the Korean War comedy-drama, which was one of the longest-running series in history — and won for playing Potter in 1980. Morgan appeared often on TV, starting in the business in its early days, and also had a long stint as Sgt. Joe Friday’s trusty partner on Dragnet. In addition to appearing on Broadway early in his career, Morgan made 50 films, working with the likes of Henry Fonda, John Wayne and Elvis Pressley and amassing credits like High Noon, Inherit The Wind, The Apple Dumpling Gang and The Shootist.
See full article at Deadline TV »

Harry Morgan: 1915-2011

  • IMDb News
Harry Morgan: 1915-2011
Harry Morgan, the actor best known for his role as the well-respected, sometimes irascible Colonel Sherman T. Potter in the long-running series "M*A*S*H", died Wednesday morning at his home in Los Angeles. He was 96.

He was born Harry Bratsberg on April 10, 1915 in Detroit, Michigan, to Henry and Anna Bratsberg, where his father worked for war hero and car designer Eddie Rickenbacker. The family soon moved to Muskegon, Michigan, where Harry, hoping to be a lawyer, became heavily involved debate and speech classes; his junior year in high school he won a debate championship at the University of Michigan. He attended the University of Chicago for a few years, before leaving school and finding employment with an office equipment maker who eventually sent him to Washington D.C. It was during his time in Washington D.C. that Harry got his start on the stage, joining the Civic Theater in Ben Hecht’s "Front Page". Eventually, he moved on to a Mt. Kisco summer stock theater company, where he met and acted regularly with actress Frances Farmer. Ms. Farmer had quite an impact of his life; she promoted his career by involving him to acting classes with Elia Kazan, and also introduced him to her University of Washington classmate Eileen Detchon. He married Detchon in 1940 and they would have four children, sons Christopher, Charles, Paul and Daniel. Harry's stage career continued to grow, as he joined New York's Group Theater, whose members included Kazan, Karl Malden and Lee J. Cobb. When Hollywood agent Charlie Feldman saw him perform on Broadway, he signed the young actor and had him quickly under studio contract with Twentieth Century Fox, where he changed his name to Henry Morgan.

Harry and Eileen made the move to Hollywood in the early 1942 and his first billed appearance (as Henry Morgan) came that year in To the Shores of Tripoli. To avoid confusion with a popular comedian of the time, another name change soon followed, and he became Harry Morgan. Morgan’s film career prospered, and in the next 5 decades he appeared in many now-legendary dramatic films, including The Ox-Bow Incident, All My Sons, Madame Bovary, High Noon, The Glenn Miller Story, Inherit the Wind, Cimarron, How the West Was Won, Frankie and Johnny, The Apple Dumpling Gang and The Shootist.

While building this impressive film resume, Morgan was simultaneously working regularly in radio and television, with brief roles in "Alfred Hitchcock Presents", "Cavalcade of America" and "The Twentieth Century Fox Hour" before landing the role of comedic neighbor Pete Porter in "December Bride", which eventually lead to the spin-off series "Pete and Gladys". In 1963, his TV career took a turn toward more serious projects, as part of the ensemble in "The Richard Boone Show" and an iconic role as Officer Bill Gannon in 1967’s "Dragnet". The series, and his performance in it, was not only a precursor to modern police and detective series, but would also inform the 1987 film Dragnet, a comedic reimagination of the show starring Dan Aykroyd and Tom Hanks; Morgan appeared in this film as Captain Bill Gannon.

Despite decades spent working in film and TV, it would be his work in the TV series "M*A*S*H" that made him instantly recognizable around the world. After a memorable, Emmy-nominated guest turn as loony Major General Steele at the beginning of the third season in 1974, Morgan was invited back to join the cast a year later as Colonel Sherman T. Potter, the late-career Army man sent to run the eccentric medical unit after the loss of their previous commanding officer. Morgan's nuanced performance as dedicated leader and surgeon with an unwavering sense of right and wrong combined with a father-like protectiveness of his staff, allowed Potter to grow organically through the long run of the series. The small touches he brought to the role – Potter's paintings were done by Morgan himself, and the picture of Mildred Potter on Potter’s desk was actually Morgan's wife Eileen – only added to the authentic humanity of his portrayal, and in 1980 Morgan won an Emmy for his performance. After the series came to an end in 1983, Morgan continued the role in the short-lived spin-off "AfterMASH".

After the death of his wife Eileen in 1985, he kept himself busy making guest appearances in series such as "The Love Boat" and took a regular role in the single season run of "Blacke's Magic". In December of 1986, he married Barbara Bushman, the granddaughter of silent film star Francis X. Bushman. His work as a TV guest star continued through the late 1990s in "The Simpsons," "3rd Rock from the Sun," "Grace Under Fire", and his final movie work included Family Plan and the short film Crosswalk.

He is survived by Barbara, his sons Christopher, Charles and Paul, and grandchildren Spencer, Rosemary and Jeremy.

He was preceded in death by his first wife Eileen in 1985 and his son Daniel in 1989.

Spotlight on Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Percy Jackson and the Olympians, and Other Books to Movies

ReelzChannel is putting the spotlight on kids books that have made the leap from the page to the big screen. Tune in Friday, February 19, at 6Pm Et/ 3Pm Pt to see how some of today's most beloved book series have been transformed into hit movies.

ReelzChannel is on DirecTV (channel 238) and Dish Network (channel 299), as well as on your cable system. From A to Z, here's the full list of books we'll be taking a look at:

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (1865)

The Apple Dumpling Gang by Jack Bickham (1971)

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl (1964)

– Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White (1952)

Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs by Judi Barrett (1978)

Coraline by Neil Gaiman (2002)

Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney (series debuted in 2007)

Fantastic Mr. Fox by Roald Dahl (1970)

– Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling (series debuted in 1997)

How to Train Your Dragon by Cressida Cowell
See full article at ReelzChannel »

Actor Don Knotts Dies at 81

  • WENN
Don Knotts, the irrepressible comic actor who won five Emmys as Deputy Barney Fife on The Andy Griffith Show, died Friday night in Los Angeles; he was 81. Knotts died of pulmonary and respiratory complications at Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Beverly Hills, and had recently suffered health problems that kept him from making an appearance at his hometown of Morgantown, West Virginia, last August. Knotts started out in entertainment as a ventriloquist before returning to college and then enlisting in the army at the onset of World War II. After the war and college, he returned to New York and pursued a career in radio and television; he nabbed a part as a psychiatrist in the Broadway play No Time for Sergeants, which starred actor Andy Griffith. He reprised his role in the film version, and after moving to Los Angeles, was cast opposite Griffith in the actor's eponymous sitcom, The Andy Griffith Show. The show ran from 1960-1968, and Knotts won an unprecedented five Best Supporting Actor Emmys in a row as manic deputy Barney Fife, a role for which he would forever be identified. After leaving the show, Knotts embarked on a film career, appearing in family-friendly films such as The Incredible Mr. Limpet, The Reluctant Astronaut and The Ghost and Mr. Chicken, among others. His career in the 70s was marked primarily by Disney films such as The Apple Dumpling Gang and No Deposit, No Return, until he joined the sitcom Three's Company in the middle of the show's run as the bumbling landlord Mr. Furley, forever interfering in his tenant's lives. After Three's Company, Knotts made innumerable appearances in television shows and occasionally films; one of his most notable recent roles was as a mysterious television repairman who sets strange events in motion in the film Pleasantville. Knotts was married twice, to Kay Mets from 1948-1969, with whom he had two children, and to Lara Lee Szuchna from 1974 to 1983. --Prepared by IMDb staff

Don Knotts: 1924-2006

Don Knotts: 1924-2006
Don Knotts, the irrepressible comic actor who won five Emmys as Deputy Barney Fife on The Andy Griffith Show, died Friday night in Los Angeles; he was 81. Knotts died of pulmonary and respiratory complications at Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Beverly Hills, and had recently suffered health problems that kept him from making an appearance at his hometown of Morgantown, West Virginia, last August. Knotts started out in entertainment as a ventriloquist before returning to college and then enlisting in the army at the onset of World War II. After the war and college, he returned to New York and pursued a career in radio and television; he nabbed a part as a psychiatrist in the Broadway play No Time for Sergeants, which starred actor Andy Griffith. He reprised his role in the film version, and after moving to Los Angeles, was cast opposite Griffith in the actor's eponymous sitcom, The Andy Griffith Show. The show ran from 1960-1968, and Knotts won an unprecedented five Best Supporting Actor Emmys in a row as manic deputy Barney Fife, a role for which he would forever be identified. After leaving the show, Knotts embarked on a film career, appearing in family-friendly films such as The Incredible Mr. Limpet, The Reluctant Astronaut and The Ghost and Mr. Chicken, among others. His career in the 70s was marked primarily by Disney films such as The Apple Dumpling Gang and No Deposit, No Return, until he joined the sitcom Three's Company in the middle of the show's run as the bumbling landlord Mr. Furley, forever interfering in his tenant's lives. After Three's Company, Knotts made innumerable appearances in television shows and occasionally films; one of his most notable recent roles was as a mysterious television repairman who sets strange events in motion in the film Pleasantville. Knotts was married twice, to Kay Mets from 1948-1969, with whom he had two children, and to Lara Lee Szuchna from 1974 to 1983. --Prepared by IMDb staff

Don Knotts: 1924-2006

Don Knotts: 1924-2006
Don Knotts, the irrepressible comic actor who won five Emmys as Deputy Barney Fife on The Andy Griffith Show, died Friday night in Los Angeles; he was 81. Knotts died of pulmonary and respiratory complications at Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Beverly Hills, and had recently suffered health problems that kept him from making an appearance at his hometown of Morgantown, West Virginia, last August. Knotts started out in entertainment as a ventriloquist before returning to college and then enlisting in the army at the onset of World War II. After the war and college, he returned to New York and pursued a career in radio and television; he nabbed a part as a psychiatrist in the Broadway play No Time for Sergeants, which starred actor Andy Griffith. He reprised his role in the film version, and after moving to Los Angeles, was cast opposite Griffith in the actor's eponymous sitcom, The Andy Griffith Show. The show ran from 1960-1968, and Knotts won an unprecedented five Best Supporting Actor Emmys in a row as manic deputy Barney Fife, a role for which he would forever be identified. After leaving the show, Knotts embarked on a film career, appearing in family-friendly films such as The Incredible Mr. Limpet, The Reluctant Astronaut and The Ghost and Mr. Chicken, among others. His career in the 70s was marked primarily by Disney films such as The Apple Dumpling Gang and No Deposit, No Return, until he joined the sitcom Three's Company in the middle of the show's run as the bumbling landlord Mr. Furley, forever interfering in his tenant's lives. After Three's Company, Knotts made innumerable appearances in television shows and occasionally films; one of his most notable recent roles was as a mysterious television repairman who sets strange events in motion in the film Pleasantville. Knotts was married twice, to Kay Mets from 1948-1969, with whom he had two children, and to Lara Lee Szuchna from 1974 to 1983. --Prepared by IMDb staff

See also

Showtimes | External Sites