Space: 1999 (1975) - News Poster

(1975–1977)

News

The Top Five Martin Landau Movie Roles of His Career

Martin Landau was a talented and successful American actor and acting coach. He was born in Brooklyn, New York, on June 20, 1928. He became famous for his regular appearances on television series ‘Mission: Impossible’ and ‘Space: 1999’. However, it was his movie roles that really shot him to fame and for which he is best-known. Sadly, Landau passed away on July 15, 2017, at the age of 89. He died in Los Angeles, California, when experienced unexpected complications following a brief stay in a hospital. He leaves behind a legacy of amazing movies and here we remember five of

The Top Five Martin Landau Movie Roles of His Career
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Bedtime Stories and Parties with Mel Brooks: Martin Landau's Daughter Remembers Life with Her Legendary Dad

  • PEOPLE.com
Bedtime Stories and Parties with Mel Brooks: Martin Landau's Daughter Remembers Life with Her Legendary Dad
Martin Landau’s daughter Susie Landau Finch tells People growing up with the Hollywood star made for a very exciting childhood.

“No one day was the same. He was full of excitement and would tell me amazing bedtime stories and was always making funny voices – so much that he scared my little sister,” she says.

The actor, who won an Academy Award in 1994 for the Tim Burton-directed Ed Wood, came to fame playing a villain in Alfred Hitchcock’s North by Northwest and later in the original Mission: Impossible TV show on CBS. He died at UCLA Medical Center
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Martin Landau's Epic Love with Mission: Impossible Costar Barbara Bain: Inside Their 36-Year Romance

  • PEOPLE.com
Martin Landau's Epic Love with Mission: Impossible Costar Barbara Bain: Inside Their 36-Year Romance
Martin Landau and Barbara Bain had a love meant for the screen.

Oscar winner Landau, who died Saturday at at age 89 after a brief illness, rose through the ranks in Hollywood alongside his Mission: Impossible costar Bain, as their marriage spanned 36 years and two children before they divorced in 1993.

Their romance got off to an unlikely start when Bain showed up to one of Landau’s classes at the Actors Studio in New York.

“I thought she was an empty-headed model, a magazine cover wired for sound,” he told People back in 1976 of his first impression of Bain. “I had hair down to my shoulders,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Hollywood Reacts to Death of Oscar-Winning Actor Martin Landau

Hollywood Reacts to Death of Oscar-Winning Actor Martin Landau
Hollywood paid tribute on social media to Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau, who died Saturday in Los Angeles.

Actors and filmmakers remembered Landau for his scene-stealing roles in films including, “North by Northwest,” “Crimes and Misdemeanors,” and “Ed Wood,” and the TV series, “Mission: Impossible.”

In addition to those who celebrated the life and mourned the loss of the actor online, the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce also announced Monday that flowers will be placed on Landau’s Walk of Fame star on Monday at 11:30 a.m. Landau’s star is located at 6845 Hollywood Boulevard.

His ex-wife, Barbara Bain, said in a statement, “If one could examine his DNA, it would read Actor. He embraced every role with fire and fierce dedication. Playing Bela Lugosi in Tim Burton’s ‘Ed Wood’ was his loving tribute to all actors and garnered him a well-deserved Academy Award. His work was his joy and his legacy.”

Alec Baldwin
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscar Winner Martin Landau Dead At Age 89

  • CinemaRetro
Landau (center) with "Mission:Impossible" co-stars (clockwise) Peter Graves, Greg Morris, Peter Lupus and Barbara Bain.

By Lee Pfeiffer

Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau has passed away at age 89. Landau had originally intended to be a cartoonist before studying at the esteemed Actors Studio in New York City. With his intense looks and persona, he began to be noticed by Hollywood studios. In 1959 he was cast as James Mason's gay henchman in Alfred Hitchcock's classic "North by Northwest". It was Landau who suggested playing the role as a not-so-closeted homosexual, a rather daring strategy for the era. The result made Landau standout in a cast of heavyweights that included Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint and Leo G. Carroll. Roles in epic films such as "Cleopatra" and "The Greatest Story Ever Told" followed. Landau also appeared regularly on popular TV programs including "The Twilight Zone", "The Untouchables", "I Spy", "The Wild,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Martin Landau, Oscar-Winning 'Ed Wood' Actor, Dead at 89

Martin Landau, Oscar-Winning 'Ed Wood' Actor, Dead at 89
Martin Landau, the Oscar-winning Ed Wood actor who appeared in Crimes & Misdemeanors, North by Northwest and the Mission: Impossible TV series over a career that spanned over 50 years, died Saturday at the age of 89.

Landau died following "unexpected complications during a short hospitalization" at the UCLA Medical Center, his representative told The Hollywood Reporter.

The actor spent five years as a newspaper cartoonist in his native New York before deciding to focus on acting; As Landau often stated, he and Steve McQueen were notably the only two applicants accepted into
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Film News: Martin Landau, Oscar Winner for ‘Ed Wood,’ Dies at 89

Los Angeles – His acting career spanned from working with Alfred Hitchcock to Tim Burton. Along the way, he had significant TV and film roles including a Best Supporting Oscar win for portraying Bela Lugosi in Burton’s “Ed Wood”. Martin Landau died in Los Angeles on July 15, 2017. He was 89.

He was one of the rare actors known both for distinctive parts in both television and film, and had a revival in his career towards the end of his life. Besides working for directors Hitchcock and Burton, he also has roles in films by Woody Allen, Joseph L. Mankiewicz, Francis Ford Coppola and Frank Darabont. On television, he had an early role on “Mission: Impossible in the 1960s, and another on the cult series “Space :1999”

Martin Landau in a 2013 Appearance in Chicago

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

Martin Landau was born in Brooklyn, New York,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

R.I.P. Martin Landau (1928 – 2017)

Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau has passed away aged 89 after suffering “unexpected complications” following a hospital visit in Los Angeles.

Landau began his career as a cartoonist for the New York Daily News before moving into acting, with early roles in the likes of North by Northwest, Cleopatra and The Greatest Story Ever Told.

Between 1966 and 1969, he starred as Rollin Hand in the TV series Mission: Impossible, a role which saw him receiving the Golden Globe Award, as well as three Emmy nominations. He would later star in Space: 1999, and earned further Emmy nominations for guest roles in Without a Trace and Entourage.

On the big screen, Landau would be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for 1988’s Tucker: The Man and His Dream (winning a Golden Globe) and 1989’s Crimes and Misdemeanors, and would win the Oscar at the third time of asking for his role
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

R.I.P. Actor Martin Landau: 1928 – 2017

Screen actor Martin Landau has died at the age of 89. Landau passed away after “unexpected complications” after a brief stay at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles on Sunday.

Landau’s career started in the 1950s after landing a high-profile role in Alfred Hitchcock’s North by Northwest in 1959. Subsequent parts included a run in television series Mission: Impossible and Space: 1999. He received a Golden Globe award and an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor for his work in Tucker: The Man and His Dream in 1988, and then a second Oscar nomination for his appearance in Crimes and Misdemeanors the following year. His performance in the supporting role of Bela Lugosi in Ed Wood (1994) finally earned him the Academy Award, a Screen Actors Guild Award and a Golden Globe Award.

He also appeared in such titles as Cleopatra, They Call Me Mister Tibbs!, Decision at Midnight, The Greatest Story Ever Told,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Martin Landau Has Passed Away

  • DailyDead
July 16th will be remembered as a day when we lost two cinematic legends. Following the heartbreaking news of George A. Romero's passing, it's now been reported that actor Martin Landau has passed away at the age of 89.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Landau passed away at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center from "unexpected complications."

Nominated several times for the Best Supporting Actor Oscar (including for his work in Francis Ford Coppola's Tucker: The Man and His Dream and Woody Allen's Crimes and Misdemeanors), Landau played horror icon Bela Lugosi opposite Johnny Depp in Tim Burton's Ed Wood, a superb supporting performance that earned him the Oscar win.

In addition to Coppola, Allen, and Burton, Landau worked with the great Alfred Hitchcock in North by Northwest. He would go on to appear in The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, one of many guest-starring roles on genre television series,
See full article at DailyDead »

Martin Landau, Mission: Impossible and Ed Wood Star, Dead at 89

Martin Landau, Mission: Impossible and Ed Wood Star, Dead at 89
Oscar winner Martin Landau died Saturday of “unexpected complications” following a brief stay at UCLA Medical Center, per The Hollywood Reporter. He was 89.

Landau got his big break when he was cast in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1959 film North by Northwest. In 1966, he began his star-making role as master of disguise Rollin Hand in the small screen Mission: Impossible, for which he earned the Golden Globe award as well as several Emmy nominations. In the series, Landau starred alongside then-wife Barbara Bain. It would mark the first of two small-screen collaborations for the couple, who later co-starred in the 1970s science-fiction program Space: 1999.
See full article at TVLine.com »

Martin Landau, Oscar Winner for ‘Ed Wood,’ Dies at 89

Martin Landau, Oscar Winner for ‘Ed Wood,’ Dies at 89
Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau, most closely associated with scene-stealing character turns in such films as “North by Northwest,” “Crimes and Misdemeanors” and “Ed Wood” as well as the classic TV series “Mission: Impossible,” died Saturday in Los Angeles, according to his publicist. He had been hospitalized at UCLA where he experienced complications. He was 89.

The lanky, offbeat-looking veteran of the Actors Studio, for he which he was currently West Coast co-artistic director, had many ups and downs in his career. His greatest successes (three Oscar nominations and one win) came later in life when he returned to character roles like the one that first won him notice, as James Mason’s sinister gay henchman in Alfred Hitchcock’s “North by Northwest.”

He was Emmy-nominated five times, and most of his leading man roles came on television, most notably as Rollin Hand, a master of disguise on “Mission: Impossible.” He later spent a couple of years starring in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Martin Landau, Oscar Winner for ‘Ed Wood’ Dies, at 89

Martin Landau, Oscar Winner for ‘Ed Wood’ Dies, at 89
Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau, most closely associated with scene-stealing character turns in such films as “North by Northwest,” “Crimes and Misdemeanors” and “Ed Wood” as well as the classic TV series “Mission: Impossible,” died Saturday in Los Angeles, according to his publicist. He had been hospitalized at UCLA where he experienced complications. He was 89.

The lanky, offbeat-looking veteran of the Actors Studio, for he which he was currently West Coast co-artistic director, had many ups and downs in his career. His greatest successes (three Oscar nominations and one win) came later in life when he returned to character roles like the one that first won him notice, as James Mason’s sinister gay henchman in Alfred Hitchcock’s “North by Northwest.”

He was Emmy-nominated five times, and most of his leading man roles came on television, most notably as Rollin Hand, a master of disguise on “Mission: Impossible.” He later spent a couple of years starring in
See full article at Variety - TV News »

DVD Review – 50 Years of Star Trek (2016)

50 Years of Star Trek, 2016.

Directed by Ian Roumain.

Synopsis:

50 Years of Star Trek isn’t an exhaustive documentary, since you can only cram so much into 85 minutes, but it is a nice look back at a franchise that has endured for half a century. It’s also notable for containing Leonard Nimoy’s last interview.

I’ve always been more of a Star Wars guy than a Star Trek one, but I have fond memories of watching repeated episodes of the original series during the early 1970s, when I was a young kid immersing myself in a lot of TV science-fiction, including Lost in Space, Space: 1999, and many other series.

Even though Star Wars became my favorite, I still eagerly looked forward to each new Trek film and saw many of them in the theater when they were released. I admit to having mixed feelings about the new reboot
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Terrahawks recieves an HD release on Blu-ray

Back in the early 1980’s the late Gerry Anderson MBE brought the Terrahawks to our screens and they were a fantastic addition to his Supermarionation catalogue, bringing Doctor “Tiger” Ninestein and the rest of the Terrahawks to defend the planet Earth from Zelda and her gang of vile followers. Today it has been revealed that Terrahawks has finally been given a High-Definition release on both Blu-ray and DVD for the first time ever!

Terrahawks: Volume 1 (U) features the first 13 episodes, presented for the first time in High Definition from the best available materials, in their original as-transmitted aspect ratio and is now available to own on Blu-ray and DVD for just £19.99 each.

Gerry Anderson, the hugely influential creator of Thunderbirds, Captain Scarlet and Space: 1999 made a spectacular return to puppet animation in the early 1980s with an exciting new series co-created with Christopher Burr. Thrilling yet another generation of children (and adults!
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Review: "Masters Of Venus" (1962) Region 2 DVD Release From The BFI

  • CinemaRetro
By Tim Greaves

Between the early 1950s and mid 1980s the Children's Film Foundation was a non-profit making establishment behind dozens of films aimed at a young audience, most of them screening as programme constituents at Saturday morning 'Picture Shows'. I didn't catch many of these during my own childhood. But I do recall a couple of particularly enjoyable ones that I did get to see in the early 1970s: Cry Wolf (1969) and All at Sea (1970), both of which are conspicuously absent from the half dozen or so collections issued on DVD to date. Many of the Cff’s films had a run-time of around an hour, although there were also a number of serials in their catalogue. Masters of Venus was one such production. Comprising eight 15-minute instalments, it arrives on DVD in the UK in a restored release from BFI.

On the day prior to mankind's first mission to Venus,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Brit classic ‘Terrahawks’ coming to Blu-ray

Terrahawks, the classic British children’s sci-fi series from the legendary creator of Thunderbirds, is to be released on Blu-ray and DVD courtesy of Network Distributing.

Gerry Anderson, the hugely influential creator of Thunderbirds, Captain Scarlet and Space: 1999 made a spectacular return to puppet animation in the early 1980s with an exciting new series co-created with Christopher Burr. Thrilling yet another generation of children (and adults!), Terrahawks introduced a new elite force to defend 21st century Earth against a host of alien invaders.

Led by the heroic Tiger Ninestein, the Terrahawks crew consists of Captain Mary Falconer, his acting second-in-command; fighter-pilot and former pop star Kate Kestrel; the poetically inclined Lieutenant Hiro; and Lt. Hawkeye – the gunner with computer-enhanced vision. Assisted by a legion of charismatic spherical robots known as the Zeroids, they battle a cabal of evil adversaries – none more terrifying than android crone Zelda, the would-be conqueror
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Why the Controversial Death on ‘The 100’ Matters

Why the Controversial Death on ‘The 100’ Matters
Don’t read on unless you’ve seen “13,” the March 3 episode of “The 100,” which showrunner Jason Rothenberg discussed with Variety. Major Spoilers Ahead.

I’m still processing the events of this week’s tumultuous episode of “The 100,” as appears to be the case with many fellow viewers. I’ve thought about little else since the episode aired, and I’m sure I’ll be pondering it for some time to come. Please don’t regard what follows as a fixed, absolute reaction. My feelings about “13” are likely to evolve as I think about it more, and much of this post will consist of me working through my thoughts and feelings as I go, so bear with me.

There’s one thing I’m sure of: I loved all the Polaris stuff. Everything to do with Becca and the doomed space station and the technology that continues to have
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Famous Monsters Podcast: Episode 3

Famous Monsters Podcast: Episode 3
Flash Gordon and Space: 1999 are in the spotlight as we delve deeper into the pages of the new Famous Monsters of Filmland magazine. Book-ending exclusive FM interview segments with Sam J. Jones and Martin Landau is lively banter with Bif Bang Pow! toys & collectibles co-founder/Flash super-fan Jason Lenzi, who joins in as our special guest. Hosted by Famous Monsters of Filmland magazine’s Executive Editor David Weiner alongside FM’s Caroline Stephenson, Jorge Marrero and Cameron Hatheway.

Flash Gordon discussion – [7:14]

Sam Jones interview – [39:43]

Flash Gordon toy talk – [46:22]

Space: 1999 discussion – [50:51]

Martin Landau interview – [1:10:30]

Space: 1999 toy talk – [1:14:47]

Buy Famous Monsters #283 here!
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

Star Trek legend William Shatner is trolling Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Star Trek legend William Shatner is trolling Star Wars: The Force Awakens
It's fair to say that William Shatner won't be first in line to see Star Wars: The Force Awakens later this year.

The Star Trek actor took to Twitter recently to say exactly why he's not a fan.

And SWs versus BSG pic.twitter.com/CVmRqnECg0

William Shatner (@WilliamShatner) October 20, 2015

Check out Sw vs Space 1999 pic.twitter.com/PymvpbzRJi

William Shatner (@WilliamShatner) October 20, 2015

First of all, he playfully suggested Star Wars nicked a villainous costume from the Cylons of Battlestar Galactica.

Then he compared the space suits to those from classic sci-fi series Space: 1999.

There doesn't seem to be a particular reason for him trolling the film, other than the age old Star Trek - Star Wars rivalry that occasionally crops up between fans.

He then rounded his rant off with this cheeky dig:

Those that can; do Star Trek. Those that can't; do SWs https://t.co
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

External Sites