Baretta (1975) - News Poster

(1975–1978)

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Robert Blake To Give Marriage Another Shot

  • TMZ
Robert Blake will take a walk down the aisle a third time ... 12 years after a jury acquitted him of murdering his second wife. We've learned the 83-year-old "Baretta" star was at the Beverly Hills Courthouse Thursday and filled out a marriage license application. He was there with the woman he will marry ... 55-year-old Pamela Hudak. We're told the 2 have known each other for decades and dated back in the day. Blake and his second wife,
See full article at TMZ »

Newswire: R.I.P. Don Calfa, character actor and star of Return Of The Living Dead

Don Calfa, perhaps best known for his role as mortician Ernie Kaltenbrunner in 1985’s Return Of The Living Dead, has died. The news was made public on the actor’s Facebook page. He was 76.

According to his biography, the Brooklyn-born Calfa intended to pursue a career in fine arts before deciding on acting. After seeing Rebel Without A Cause, Calfa dropped out of high school to study at Irwin Piscotor’s The Dramatic Workshop. His first credited role is that of “Priest” in Robert Downey, Sr.’s No More Excuses in 1968. Calfa cut his teeth throughout the ‘70s, guest starring on Baretta, Kojak, The Streets Of San Francisco, and Barney Miller. “I have one record to my name,” Calfa revealed in a 2008 interview with Cult Radio A Go Go. “I did more guest appearances on Barney Miller than anyone. Never a recurring character, but a different ...
See full article at The AV Club »

'Mission: Impossible': 15 Things You (Probably) Didn't Know About the Tom Cruise Blockbuster

Before 1996, "Mission: Impossible" was a long-since-cancelled TV spy series, beloved by Boomers but forgotten by anyone younger. Today, of course, it's a popular Tom Cruise movie franchise, known for its twisty plotting and jaw-dropping stunt sequences, whose five installments to date have grossed $935 million in North America and $2.8 billion worldwide.

The change came, of course, with the release of Cruise's first "Mission: Impossible" 20 years ago, on May 22, 1996. Since then, Brian De Palma's clever, convoluted blockbuster has been watched and copied plenty. And while some of the spy franchise's secrets have become widely known, there are still some that have remained classified -- until now.

1. "Mission: Impossible" marked Cruise's debut as a producer. In a deal that would become his then-customary contract, he took no money up front but negotiated a lucrative percentage of the theatrical and video gross profits, reportedly as high as 22 percent. Cruise reportedly pocketed an estimated $70 million for the first "Mission.
See full article at Moviefone »

John Sarno, Acting Teacher and Actor, Dies at 75

John Anthony Sarno, a noted acting teacher in Hollywood and New York whose students included Margaret Avery, Daryl Hannah, Tracy Britton, Oliver Stone and Annie Potts, died December 25 after a battle with cancer. He was 75.

Before becoming an acting teacher, Sarno had a lengthy acting career himself and studied under and lived with his mentor, actor and legendary acting teacher Lee Strasberg.

Sarno performed on Broadway, acting as Billy Bibbit in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” He moved from New York to Los Angeles to star in his breakthrough role, Jerry Griffith, in the film “The Seven Minutes,” directed by Russ Meyer. Sarno drew a Golden Globe Award nomination for most promising newcomer for his performance.

During the 1970s and ’80s Sarno made guest appearances on TV shows including “Baretta,” “Medical Center” and “Kojak,” later guesting on “NYPD Blue” in 1997.

He appeared in the 2007 film “Zodiac” and
See full article at Variety - TV News »

John Sarno, Acting Teacher and Actor, Dies at 75

John Anthony Sarno, a noted acting teacher in Hollywood and New York, died December 25 after a battle with cancer. He was 75.

Before becoming an acting teacher, Sarno had a lengthy acting career himself and studied under and lived with his mentor, actor and legendary acting teacher Lee Strasberg.

Sarno preformed on Broadway, acting as Billy Bibbit in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” He moved from New York to Los Angeles to star in his breakthrough role, Jerry Griffith, in the film “The Seven Minutes,” directed by Russ Meyer. Sarno drew a Golden Globe Award nomination for most promising newcomer for his performance.

During the 1970s and ’80s Sarno made guest appearances on TV shows including “Baretta,” “Medical Center” and “Kojak,” later guesting on “NYPD Blue” in 1997.

He appeared in the 2007 film “Zodiac” and this past year was cast in the film “Monday at 11:01 A.M.,” which
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Review: “St. Ives” (1976) Starring Charles Bronson And Jacqueline Bisset; Warner Archive Streaming Service

  • CinemaRetro
By Don Stradley

Charles Bronson was 55 at the time of “St Ives” (1976). He was just a couple years past his star-making turn in “Death Wish”, and was enjoying a surprising run of success. I say surprising because Bronson had, after all, been little more than a craggy second banana for most of his career. Now, inexplicably, he had box office clout as a leading man. In fact, Bronson reigned unchallenged for a few years as the most popular male actor in international markets. Yes, even bigger than Eastwood, Newman, Reynolds, Redford, or any other 1970s star you can name. Many of Bronson’s movies were partly financed by foreign investors, for even if his movies didn’t score stateside, they still drew buckets of money in Prague or Madrid. Some have suggested that his popularity on foreign screens was due to how little he said in his movies (there was
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Casey Kasem: 10 Things You Didn’t Know About His Early Career

Casey Kasem: 10 Things You Didn’t Know About His Early Career
Everybody knows that Casey Kasem was the voice of “American Top 40″ and countless cartoon characters for decades. But who could forget him on “Astrology for Young Lovers”? Or in “Scream Free!” Or as the host of “Shebang.”

In the 1960s and ’70s, Kasem, who died Sunday at age 82, logged roles in a string of B-grade independent features, from American International Prods. and others. He romped with wild bikinis, frisky teenagers, motorcycle clubs, “high on Jesus” types etc. He did a fair amount of on-camera TV work too, as a host and through gusts shots on “Baretta,” “Hawaii 5-0” and such. He was money on NBC’s “Dean Martin Celebrity Roast” specials, judging by the number of appearances he made.

See Also: Radio Legend Casey Kasem Dies at 82

But nothing plumped Kasem’s pocketbook like his commercial work. In 1973 his agent Charles Stern bragged that Kasem had voiced 600 commercials in four years.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Scream Factory Makes a Date with The Final Terror; Full Release Info!

Scream Factory is absolutely killing it this year with their releases and one of the many films being added to the ever-growing collection in the coming months is the 80s backwoods slasher flick The Final Terror, making its way out of the woods on July 1st.

Read on for a complete rundown of all the release info, including bonus features and box art!

From the Press Release

This summer, one of the most sought-after and long-lost slasher films from the 80s is being unleashed on Blu-ray™ and DVD for the first time! Produced by Joe Roth (Snow White and the Huntsman) and directed by Andrew Davis (The Fugitive, Under Siege), backwoods slasher cult classic The Final Terror features an all-star cast of John Friedrich (Baretta), Rachel Ward (The Thornbirds), Adrian Zmed (Bachlor Party), Mark Metcalf (Zero Dark Thrity), Daryl Hannah (Kill Bill, Blade Runner), Ernes Harden Jr. (White Men Can
See full article at Dread Central »

The Final Terror Blu-ray & DVD Release Details

Another 80′s cult classic is making it’s way to Blu-ray and DVD for the first time. Scream Factory just revealed full details on their upcoming release of 1983′s The Final Terror and we have a look at the cover art and list of bonus features:

“This summer, one of the most sought-after and long-lost slasher films from the 80s is being unleashed on Blu-ray™ and DVD for the first time! Produced by Joe Roth (Snow White and the Hunts Man) and directed by Andrew Davis (The Fugitive, Under Siege), backwoods slasher cult classic The Final Terror features an all-star cast of John Friedrich (Baretta), Rachel Ward (The Thornbirds), Adrian Zmed (Bachlor Party), Mark Metcalf (Zero Dark Thrity), Daryl Hannah (Kill Bill, Blade Runner), Ernes Harden Jr. (White Men Can’t Jump ), Joe Pantoliano (The Matrix, The Fugitive) and Lewis Smith (Django Unchained). On July 1, 2014, Scream Factory™ will unleash The Final Terror
See full article at DailyDead »

Marlboro Man Eric Lawson Dies

Eric Lawson, a working actor who portrayed the Marlboro Man in cigarette ads during the late 1970s, has died. He was 72. Lawson's wife, Susan Lawson, said Sunday that her husband died Jan. 10 at his California home. The cause was respiratory failure due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or Copd. The ruggedly handsome Lawson portrayed the smoking cowboy in Marlboro print ads from 1978 to 1981. He also had bit parts in such TV shows as Baretta and Charlie's Angels before injuries sustained on the set of a Western film ended his acting career. A smoker since age 14, Lawson later appeared in an
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Will Quentin Tarantino Be Working In Prison?

Just this past week, Quentin Tarantino‘s screenplay for his new western, The Hateful Eight, was leaked online much to the director’s (and the world’s) dismay and wrath. His recourse? To flat out cancel the entire movie. Sorry, fans. It was a wrap before it was even shot, and now no one will get to see Tim Roth in a cowboy hat.

Not to be discouraged though, Tarantino told Deadline recently that he is already hard at work on another project, this one (rumors have it) revolving around the case of actor Robert Blake. Blake, who starred in the 1970′s TV series Baretta, was accused of murdering his wife back in 2001. He was ultimately acquitted, but a civil case brought forth by Blake’s own children found him liable for his wife’s death, and Blake ended up spending more than a year in prison.

Tarantino has not
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Is Quentin Tarantino Working On A Prison Movie Inspired By The Robert Blake Case?

With Quentin Tarantino's script for his proposed, 70mm western "The Hateful Eight" having leaked, causing the director to scrap the project, could he already be working on his next movie? Indeed, he did tell Deadline he was plowing ahead on another movie. “The idea was, I was going to write two scripts,” Tarantino said. “I wasn’t going to shoot the Western until next winter, and I have been full of piss and vinegar about the other one. So now I’ll do that one.” While he wouldn't spill what that movie was all about, rumors are already percolating about what it is. According to The Wrap, Tarantino is penning "a prison movie of sorts" and that he has "immersed himself in the details of the Robert Blake case." In case you've forgotten, Blake is the former star of the '70s series "Baretta," who was accused of murdering his wife,
See full article at The Playlist »

Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful Eight script likened to 'tense stage play'

Story of bounty hunters transporting prisoners through 19th-century Wyoming would have been shot in 70mm format

Quentin Tarantino's cancelled western The Hateful Eight would have centred on two bounty hunters plying their trade in bloody 19th-century Wyoming, according to reports.

Tarantino was left seething earlier this weak after the draft screenplay for his new film was leaked by an unnamed Hollywood agent. He has declared the project defunct, and says he will publish the script in text form instead.

Now the Wrap reports that it has seen the screenplay, which has now been photocopied a number of times and is said to be circulating in Hollywood. Tarantino planned a film in 70mm, an unusual and expensive format recently used by Paul Thomas Anderson for The Master, and there would have been plum roles for Michael Madsen, Bruce Dern, Christoph Waltz and Samuel L Jackson, the site says.

The Hateful Eight
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

2013 celebrity deaths: Paul Walker, Cory Monteith, James Gandolfini

The year now ending marks another 12-month period of losing talents who have given television viewers entertainment or information ... and some of those passings, even more sadly, came as major and untimely shocks. Zap2it remembers:

Paul Walker: The actor best-known for the "Fast & Furious" movies had career roots in such TV shows as "Who's the Boss?" "Highway to Heaven" and "Touched by an Angel."

James Gandolfini: He projected so much older as mobster Tony Soprano, many were surprised to learn the three-time Emmy winner only was in his 30s and 40s when he played the part.

Cory Monteith: As Finn Hudson on "Glee," the Canadian-born performer touched fans of all ages both in life and afterward.

Jean Stapleton: Forever TV's top "dingbat," the "All in the Family" actress earned three Emmys as lovably daffy Edith Bunker.

Jonathan Winters: The improvisation genius who inspired his
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

‘China Syndrome’ Writer Thomas S. Cook Honored by WGA

The Writers Guild of America West has named the late Thomas S. Cook as its 2014 Morgan Cox Award honoree in recognition of his guild service.

The award will be presented posthumously to Cook at the WGA’s West Coast ceremony on Feb. 1 in Los Angeles at the Jw Marriott L.A. Live. Cook died Jan. 5 after a battle with cancer.

“Tom was a beloved member of this guild, renowned both for the remarkable work he produced and for his unending commitment to give something of himself back,” said WGA West president Christopher Keyser. “His service touched on every corner of our mission and lasted over three wonderful decades. Even in his final days, as a Trustee of our Health and Pension Fund, he never forgot the needs of his fellow writers, and we, in turn, will never forget him.”

Cook was best known for co-writing the screenplay for “The China Syndrome
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘China Syndrome’ Writer Thomas S. Cook Honored by WGA

The Writers Guild of America West has named the late Thomas S. Cook as its 2014 Morgan Cox Award honoree in recognition of his guild service.

The award will be presented posthumously to Cook at the WGA’s West Coast ceremony on Feb. 1 in Los Angeles at the Jw Marriott L.A. Live. Cook died Jan. 5 after a battle with cancer.

“Tom was a beloved member of this guild, renowned both for the remarkable work he produced and for his unending commitment to give something of himself back,” said WGA West president Christopher Keyser. “His service touched on every corner of our mission and lasted over three wonderful decades. Even in his final days, as a Trustee of our Health and Pension Fund, he never forgot the needs of his fellow writers, and we, in turn, will never forget him.”

Cook was best known for co-writing the screenplay for “The China Syndrome
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Tony Musante, Actor Who Left ‘Toma,’ Dies at 77

Tony Musante, Actor Who Left ‘Toma,’ Dies at 77
Tony Musante, who appeared on numerous TV shows, in films and on Broadway, but was best known for starring in 1973 series “Toma,” died Tuesday in Manhattan of a hemorrhage after oral surgery. He was 77.

Musante left the ABC detective show after one season to pursue opportunities onstage such as his first Broadway role, “P.S. Your Cat is Dead!,” and in films. After he left, the show was relaunched a few years later as “Baretta” and became popular with Robert Blake in Musante’s .

He had a recurring role on “Oz” and was nominated for an Emmy for “Medical Story.”

Among his film roles were “The Last Run” opposite George C. Scott in 1971, “The Pope of Greenwich Village” and 1967′s “The Incident” with Martin Sheen. He appeared on Broadway with Meryl Streep in Tennessee Williams’s “27 Wagons Full of Cotton” in 1976.

Although “Toma” was performing fairly well against highly-rated “The
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Tony Musante, Actor Who Left ‘Toma,’ Dies at 77

Tony Musante, Actor Who Left ‘Toma,’ Dies at 77
Tony Musante, who appeared on numerous TV shows, in films and on Broadway, but was best known for starring in 1973 series “Toma,” died Tuesday in Manhattan of a hemorrhage after oral surgery. He was 77.

Musante left the ABC detective show after one season to pursue opportunities onstage such as his first Broadway role, “P.S. Your Cat is Dead!,” and in films. After he left, the show was relaunched a few years later as “Baretta” and became popular with Robert Blake in Musante’s .

He had a recurring role on “Oz” and was nominated for an Emmy for “Medical Story.”

Among his film roles were “The Last Run” opposite George C. Scott in 1971, “The Pope of Greenwich Village” and 1967′s “The Incident” with Martin Sheen. He appeared on Broadway with Meryl Streep in Tennessee Williams’s “27 Wagons Full of Cotton” in 1976.

Although “Toma” was performing fairly well against highly-rated “The
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Actor Tony Musante Dead At Age 77

  • CinemaRetro
Tony Musante, the popular character actor who was a fixture in Italian films and TV series, has died in a New York hospital at age 77. Musante, who brought intensity to all of his roles, was driven more by artistic satisfaction than a desire to make the big money. He made a splash with U.S. audiences in 1967 playing a thug who terrorizes passengers on a New York City subway train in the film The Incident. He won acclaim for his role as a gay man who is wrongly convicted and executed for murder in the 1968 Frank Sinatra film The Detective. He also had a co-starring role with George C. Scott in the 1971 crime film The Last Run and starred in director Dario Argento's 1970 cult classic The Bird With the Crystal Plumage. In 1973 he reluctantly starred in the TV series Toma about a maverick cop. Despite the show's ratings success,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Tony Musante, ‘Oz’ Star, Dead at 77

  • The Wrap
Tony Musante, ‘Oz’ Star, Dead at 77
Tony Musante, who recently starred as a mafia boss on the HBO series “Oz” but was best-known for playing a real-life Newark, N.J. detective in the “Baretta” precursor series “Toma,” died Tuesday due to complications resulting from surgery, the Los Angeles Times reports. He was 77. Born in Bridgeport, Conn., in 1936, Musante caught the attention of television audiences with the ABC cop series “Toma,” which was baased on the the biography of Newark detective David Toma. The series, which ran for one season from 1973 to 1974, was later retooled as “Baretta,” starring Robert Blake, which ran on ABC from...
See full article at The Wrap »
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