7.7/10
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48 user 18 critic

That's Entertainment! (1974)

Various MGM stars from yesterday present their favourite musical moments from the studio's 50 year history.

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2 wins. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Himself - Co-Host / Narrator / Clip from 'The Band Wagon'
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Himself - Co-Host / Narrator / Clip from 'Going Hollywood'
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Himself - Co-Host / Narrator / Clips from 'Take Me Out to the Ball Game' - 'Singin' in the Rain' and 'An American in Paris'
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Himself - Co-Host / Narrator - Clip from 1947 version of 'Good News'
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Herself - Co-Host & Narrator
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Himself - Co-Host / Narrator / Clip from 'Singin' in the Rain'
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Herself - Co-Host / Narrator / Clip from 'Singin' in the Rain'
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Himself - Co-Host / Narrator / Clips from 'Babes in Arms' - 'Girl Crazy' - 'Babes on Broadway'
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Himself - Co-Host
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Himself - Co-Host
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Herself - Co-Host / Narrator / Clip from 'Cynthia'
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
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Clip from 'Words and Music' (archive footage)
Kay Armen ...
Clip from 'Hit the Deck' (archive footage)
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Clips from 'The Wizard of Oz' and 'The Harvey Girls' (archive footage)
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Clip from 'The Great Ziegfeld' (archive footage)
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Storyline

MGM musical numbers from the introduction of sound in the late '20s through to the 1950s, possibly with Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, and Judy Garland getting the most coverage. Linked by some of the stars who worked at MGM handing the commentary on one to another. Written by Jeremy Perkins {J-26}

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

More than a movie. It's a celebration. See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

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Release Date:

21 June 1974 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

That's Entertainment: 50 Years of MGM  »

Box Office

Budget:

$3,200,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(35 mm magnetic prints)| (35 mm optical prints)|

Color:

(Metrocolor)|

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

A shadow of its former self, this was one of only five MGM films released in 1974. And given that it is mostly a compilation of existing footage, it can't truly be considered a "new" movie. See more »

Goofs

In the "A Pretty Girl is Like a Melody" sequence from The Great Ziegfeld, narrator Frank Sinatra says that Dennis Morgan is singing the song. In fact, Morgan's singing is dubbed by Allan Jones, not because Morgan's well-known tenor voice was unacceptable but because Jones had already pre-recorded the mammoth sequence. At the time, the still unknown Morgan was billed by his real name, Stanley Morner. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Frank Sinatra: [narrating] The year is 1929; the singer, Cliff Edwards, also known as Ukelele Ike. The film: "Hollywood Revue"; it is the first all-talking, all-singing, all-dancing movie ever made. In the years that followed, "Singin' in the Rain" would become a theme song for MGM.
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Crazy Credits

Before Leo the Lion roars at the beginning, the words "Beginning our next 50 years" appear in the lion's traditional place in the MGM logo, which itself has been modified to indicate the company's golden anniversary. See more »

Connections

Features The Toast of New Orleans (1950) See more »

Soundtracks

On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe
(1946) (uncredited)
Music by Harry Warren
Lyrics by Johnny Mercer
Performed by Judy Garland and others
From The Harvey Girls (1946)
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User Reviews

 
I could watch it over and over again. Brilliant! Wish it was in DVD
2 May 2003 | by (Kelowna, Canada) – See all my reviews

I could watch it over and over again. Brilliant! Wish it was in DVD. The music is timeless, the dancing unforgettable and will never again be seen at that level on screen, I'm sure.Busby Berkeley's choreography is beyond compare. I did not agree, however, with Sinatra's opinion that the dance from American in Paris was the greatest ever. Several Fred Astaire dance numbers were far superior. Nobody has ever come close to Fred and Ginger as a team.


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