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The Parallax View (1974)

An ambitious reporter gets in way-over-his-head trouble while investigating a senator's assassination which leads to a vast conspiracy involving a multinational corporation behind every event in the world's headlines.

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2 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Walter McGinn ...
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Chuck Waters ...
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Senator Charles Carroll (as Bill Joyce)
Betty Murray ...
Mrs. Charles Carroll (as Bettie Johnson)
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Parallax Assassin
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Chrissy - Frady's Girl (as JoAnne Harris)
Ted Gehring ...
Schecter - Hotel Clerk
Lee Pulford ...
Shirley - Salmontail Bar Girl
Doria Cook-Nelson ...
Gale from Salmontail (as Doria Cook)
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Storyline

Joe Frady is a determined reporter who often needs to defend his work from colleagues. After the assassination of a prominent U.S. senator, Frady begins to notice that reporters present during the assassination are dying mysteriously. After getting more involved in the case, Frady begins to realize that the assassination was part of a conspiracy somehow involving the Parallax Corporation, an enigmatic training institute. He then decides to enroll for the Parallax training himself to discover the truth. Written by Philip Brubaker <coda@nando.net>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

There is no conspiracy. Just twelve people dead. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Thriller

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

30 September 1974 (Sweden)  »

Also Known As:

Zeuge einer Verschwörung  »

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(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film was part of a cycle of 1970s conspiracy movies. These included Klute (1971), Chinatown (1974), Cutter's Way (1981), Telefon (1977), Winter Kills (1979), The Conversation (1974), The Parallax View (1974), Three Days of the Condor (1975), The Domino Principle (1977), Good Guys Wear Black (1978), Twilight's Last Gleaming (1977), Hangar 18 (1980), Capricorn One (1977), and All the President's Men (1976). Blow Out (1981) would follow in the early 1980s. See more »

Goofs

In the opening Independence Day parade sequence, there are no leaves on the tree branches visible as the senator and his wife pass by, but the leaves would be full and green on July 4th in Seattle. See more »

Quotes

Joseph Frady: Look, why don't you go out and bust up a keno game. Do something worthwhile for chrissakes, you two bit vice squad, you're not only dumb, you're dirty.
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Connections

Referenced in Mr. Robot: eps2.0_unm4sk-pt2.tc (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

Moon River
Written by Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
A Triumph in Cinematography as Seeing
15 January 2003 | by (Nashville, TN) – See all my reviews

The term, parallax, has everything to do with seeing, and as such it is particularly fitting for a film that is about seeing on many levels. Gordon Willis' distinctive cinematography is a perfect match for just such an enterprise. His commanding use of light, shapes, and (most of all) darkness creates a sense of uncertainty that flavors this so-called paranoid thriller. Along with under-sung director Alan J. Pakula, Willis is working here with pretty much the same production team that would next give us _All the President's Men_, but they do as well in this earlier film with apparently a lot less. Contrast the newsroom as shown here with the detailed recreation of The Washington Post in ATPM. It seems like Hume Cronyn and Warren Beatty are the whole newspaper in _The Parallax View_. That's fine. It's supposed to be two-bit paper.

We are shown eyewitnesses who don't know what they thought they saw during an assassination attempt. We don't know what we thought we saw either. We are shown conspirators who are constantly seeing around the next corner. We are kept guessing as well. We follow Warren Beatty nervously as he tries to keep ahead of this game. Kenneth Mars even gives Beatty a second false identity just in case the first one is checked. Finally, we take a slide-show psychological exam right along with Beatty, and perhaps we wonder what our own responses to it show us to be. It's a very special film that allows us to trust the filmmakers even though we know they may be giving us unreliable information. That blind trust seems to be the soul of this truly great movie.

Finally, I'd like to cast a vote for Mr. Beatty as one of our true American acting treasures. Where would the great films of the 70s be without his hip, wise-cracking presence? Did we expect Elliott Gould to do all the work?


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