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(1974)

Trivia

Jump to: Cameo (3) | Spoilers (1)
There were said to be only five 35mm prints of the film, all blown-up from 16mm, which journeyed around Australia for screenings. This helps explain the slight 'soft-focus' feel and general scratchy quality of surviving prints.
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The fact that the film is in colour was a major selling point - at the time the parent TV show was transmitted (and indeed made) entirely in monochrome.
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Early audiences applauded the regular characters' initial appearances, delighted to see them on the big screen.
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A kiss between Don Finlayson and Simon Carr was seemingly excised from all of the currently-existing film-prints at some point after the film hit cinemas; consequently the sequence is no longer known to exist.
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It is claimed that the film was shot (mainly on the TV show's existing sets) on a mere $100,000 budget in eleven days before the crew broke for their regular Christmas holiday in 1973; the cast would receive only an extra week's salary ($400 apiece). Because of this quick turnaround David Sale remembers Lynn Rainbow shooting the entirety of her scenes as Sonia Hunter over the course of one day.
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David Sale and Johnny Whyte storylined the film together then split the writing chores 50/50.
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Bettina Welch was a very infrequent and moderate drinker, so actually indulged in a small amount of alcohol to help her play the scene of a drunken Maggie Cameron more convincingly.
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"Bloody hell, it's Abigail!" exclaims Alf Sutcliffe when Norma Whittaker arrives at the Evans' ruby wedding costume party. When the film went before the cameras at the close of 1973, Abigail had recently - and publicly - left the show's cast, resulting in the hurried recasting of her character Bev Houghton.
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First, final and only ever theatrical feature film directed by Peter Benardos.
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This movie was shot on 16mm and blown-up to 35mm.
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When the TV series Number 96 (1972) switched to color, the studio-shot end credit sequence using a black and white still photograph was replaced by the color filmed credit sequence of the building that had been shot on location for this feature film spin-off movie.
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This picture was a box-office hit when screened in Australia in 1974.
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This movie was filmed during December 1973.
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According to the book 'Australian Film 1900-1977', this film version of Number 96 (1972) used the "same episodic format of the serial".
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This movie was the first time that a 'Number 96' production had been seen in color. The TV series Number 96 (1972) up to the time of this movie's release had still been in black-and-white.
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Notoriously, this movie's budget was so small that the producers refused to disclose it.
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This movie used the same sets as for its source TV series Number 96 (1972).
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The sets from the TV series Number 96 (1972) had to be adjusted and touched-up for color photography as the TV series was still filmed in black-and-white when this movie was made.
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This movie was able to cross-over censorship limitations and show more risqué and bawdy material than one was able to on Australian television despite the fact that the TV series Number 96 (1972) was risqué and controversial enough anyway.
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This movie was first released in Australia in mid 1974 which was about two years after its source TV series Number 96 (1972) had debuted in Australia on 13 March 1972.
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This movie had the same cast as the Number 96 (1972) TV series but not everyone in the serial over the years appeared in this movie.
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Abigail, one of the Number 96 (1972) TV series' most famous stars, did not appear in this movie. Abigail had left the series when the movie was made.
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This picture was one of a number of Australian movies made during the early to mid 1970s that were a spin-off from an Australian TV series. The movies include: The Intruders (1970), Country Town (1971), The Box (1975) and Number 96 (1974).
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This film's director Peter Benardos also directed TV episodes of Number 96 (1972).
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The address of the real life building which still stands today that was used as an exterior for the block of apartments in this movie and the TV series Number 96 (1972) is 83 Moncur Street, Woollahra, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
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This movie was shot during the Christmas break of the TV series Number 96 (1972).
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First theatrical film for Australian actress Rebecca Gilling.
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In June 1974, just after the time this movie was first released in May 1974 (and as it was road-showed, was still playing), actress Rebecca Gilling was also being seen on Australian screens in Stone (1974).
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Actors Lynn Rainbow Tom Oliver, appearing in this movie, were married at the time of production and release.
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Lynn Rainbow shot all her scenes in one day.
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This movie was renown for audiences clapping and applauding when their favorite TV show characters from Number 96 (1972) made their first entrance in the movie.
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This film is considered an "Ozploitation" (Australian exploitation) picture.
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Cameo 

Albie Thoms:  Uncredited, as a biker during the opening sequence.
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Caz Lederman:  Uncredited, as a bikie chick during the opening sequence.
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Paul Chubb:  As a man.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

An end-of-movie title card reads: "Oh, what the Hell let's have a Happy Ending!".
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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