The Man with the Golden Gun
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2002

18 items from 2016


The Smallest Show On Earth: In Memory Of The Bijou (1957) And The Alger (1940-2015)

18 June 2016 10:07 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

The delightful British comedy The Smallest Show on Earth headlines a great Saturday matinee offering from the UCLA Film and Television Archive on June 25 as their excellent series “Marquee Movies: Movies on Moviegoing” wraps up. So it seemed like a perfect time to resurrect my review of the movie, which celebrates the collective experience of seeing cinema in a darkened, and in this case dilapidated old auditorium, alongside my appreciation of my own hometown movie house, the Alger, which opened in 1940 and closed last year, one more victim of economics and the move toward digital distribution and exhibition.

*******************************

“You mean to tell me my uncle actually charged people to go in there? And people actually paid?” –Matt Spenser (Bill Travers) upon first seeing the condition of the Bijou Kinema, in The Smallest Show on Earth

In Basil Dearden’s charming and wistful 1957 British comedy The Smallest Show on Earth (also »

- Dennis Cozzalio

Permalink | Report a problem


Rolex in the Movies: The Action Timepiece

10 June 2016 7:16 AM, PDT | Clothes on Film | See recent Clothes on Film news »

It’s the most celebrated, the most special, the most significant watch of all time; Rolex is symbolic of many things in the movies: style, wealth, attitude, and perhaps most importantly, taste. That is not to say a Rolex is elitist, but rather that the wearer on screen, anyone from James Bond to Steve McQueen, is someone possessed of the knowledge that there is no better. Rolex is the pinnacle.

The history of Rolex on film is not nearly as interesting as the scope of its wearers and how this simple act of either discreet or ostentatious display can define character. Take James Bond, a man whose breeding was forced upon him; he developed taste and nurtured it. Roger Moore’s incarnation of 007, the most overlooked style wise, is 100% a Rolex customer – even if his custom Submariner in Live and Let Die (1971) was modified somewhat by Q Branch. Sorry, but »

- Lord Christopher Laverty

Permalink | Report a problem


Who should direct / star in the next Bond?

28 May 2016 6:00 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

In not surprising news, Sam Mendes is moving on from the 007 franchise after Skyfall (2012) and Spectre (2015). Daniel Craig is probably moving on, too, but rumors about who will replace him are, as ever, premature. The names floating about this time are Idris Elba and Tom Hiddleston (wishful fan thinking, maybe, since the internet has been suggesting these two names forever) and 30 year old Jamie Bell which is an interesting idea and probably not a bad one. If chosen he'd be the youngest Bond since Sean Connery (who was 30 when he was cast for Dr. No (1962) though most subsequent Bonds have been around 40 when they started. Plus Bell is super charismatic but underused in cinema.

Though Bond films are largely regarded as producer driven and leading actor focused pictures, rather than directorial feats, the man in the chair is important. In the past the franchise has generally relied on mid level directors rather than auteurs, »

- NATHANIEL R

Permalink | Report a problem


JoBlo Movie Trivia Quiz: James Bond

27 April 2016 8:16 AM, PDT | JoBlo.com | See recent JoBlo news »

Welcome to JoBlo.com's Clandestine Movie Trivia Quizzes! Each week we'll be presenting you with a new movie quiz with which to test your cinematic knowledge. With the recent passing of Guy Hamilton, director of Goldfinger, Diamonds Are Forever, Live And Let Die, and The Man With The Golden Gun, I started thinking about the James Bond franchise and how amazing it is that it's still going strong... Read More »

- Kevin Fraser

Permalink | Report a problem


Guy Hamilton, James Bond Director, Passes Away at 93

21 April 2016 10:52 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Guy Hamilton, who directed four James Bond movies including the 1964 classic Goldfinger, passed away earlier today at the age of 93. The filmmaker died on the Spanish island of Majorca where he lived. No details about the cause of death were given at this time, but we'll be sure to keep you posted with more updates as soon as they come in.

Guy Hamilton was born September 16, 1922 in Paris, France, and he got his start in the film business in the late 1940s. He served as director Carol Reed's assistant for five years, before becoming an assistant director on his 1949 classic film The Third Man. He also served as an assistant director on The Angel With the Trumpet, The Great Manhunt, Outcast of the Islands and the John Huston classic The African Queen, before making his directorial debut in 1951 with The Ringer.

He went on to direct An Inspector Calls, »

- MovieWeb

Permalink | Report a problem


Guy Hamilton obituary

21 April 2016 9:45 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Director best known for his Bond films, The Colditz Story and An Inspector Calls

With four James Bond movies – Goldfinger (1964), Diamonds Are Forever (1971), Live and Let Die (1973) and The Man With the Golden Gun (1974) – among his credits, the director Guy Hamilton, who has died aged 93, was one of Britain’s most bankable film-makers. But his latter-day fame, for these and other commercial blockbusters, detracted in the eyes of many critics from his earlier achievements.

Hamilton’s long career began as an assistant director, a job that most usually led to work in production. He, however, was determined to direct and decided that “the trick was not to be an assistant director, but to become the director’s assistant”, thus gaining valuable experience by tackling those tasks that preoccupied bosses chose to delegate. During a six-year period he became recognised as the best in the business, working for Alberto Cavalcanti, Sidney Gilliat, »

- Brian Baxter

Permalink | Report a problem


James Bond director Guy Hamilton dies, aged 93

21 April 2016 9:15 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

facebook

twitter

google+

Guy Hamilton, who transformed James Bond, dies at the age of 93.

Guy Hamilton, best known for the his work on the James Bond movies, Goldfinger, Diamonds are Forever, Live and Let Die and The Man with the Golden Gun, has died at the Hospital Juaneda Miramar in the city of Palma de Mallorca on the Spanish island of Mallorca. He was 93.

Hamilton raised the profile of the James Bond movies through his work with original film 007 actor Sean Connery and Roger Moore, who played the spy starting with Live and Let Die and in 1974's The Man with the Golden Gun, which Hamilton directed.

"Incredibly, incredibly saddened to hear the wonderful director Guy Hamilton has gone to the great cutting room in the sky. 2016 is horrid," Moore wrote on Twitter.

Hamilton worked with Michael Caine on Battle of Britain and Harrison Ford on the 1978 adaptation of Force 10 from Navarone. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Guy Hamilton, James Bond Movie Director, Dies at 93

21 April 2016 7:19 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Guy Hamilton, the British director best known for directing four films in the “James Bond” franchise, died on Wednesday at age 93. Sir Roger Moore, who worked with Hamilton on the Bond films “Live and Let Die” and “The Man with the Golden Gun,” tweeted the news early Thursday. “Incredibly, incredibly saddened to hear the wonderful director Guy Hamilton has gone to the great cutting room in the sky,” he wrote. “2016 is horrid.” Also Read: Ken Adam, James Bond and 'Dr. Strangelove' Production Designer, Dies at 95 Hamilton died at a Spanish hospital on the island of Majorca, BBC reported. »

- Joe Otterson

Permalink | Report a problem


R.I.P. Guy Hamilton

21 April 2016 7:14 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

British filmmaker Guy Hamilton has died in Majorca at the age of 93. Hamilton set the template for the James Bond franchise when he helmed 1964's iconic "Goldfinger".

He returned to the franchise in the early 1970s for Sean Connery's final outing with "Diamonds are Forever," and then ushered in Roger Moore's start to the series with "Live and Let Die" and "The Man with the Golden Gun".

In a statement, Bond series producers Barbara Broccoli and Michael G. Wilson say: "We mourn the loss of our dear friend Guy Hamilton who firmly distilled the Bond formula in his much celebrated direction of 'Goldfinger' and continued to entertain audiences with 'Diamonds Are Forever,' 'Live and Let Die' and 'The Man with the Golden Gun.' We celebrate his enormous contribution to the Bond films."

Hamilton's work stretched far beyond Bond as well including directing "Funeral in Berlin, »

- Garth Franklin

Permalink | Report a problem


Guy Hamilton Dead At Age 93; Directed Four James Bond Films And "Battle Of Britain".

21 April 2016 6:51 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Guy Hamilton and Roger Moore on the set of "The Man With the Golden Gun" in Thailand, 1974.

 

By Lee Pfeiffer

Cinema Retro mourns the loss of director Guy Hamilton, who has passed away at age 93. Guy was an old friend and supporter of our magazine and a wonderful talent and raconteur. Hamilton, though British by birth, spent much of his life in France. After WWII, he entered the film industry in England and served as assistant director to Sir Carol Reed, working on the classic film "The Third Man". He also served as Ad on John Huston's "The African Queen". Gradually, he moved up the ladder to director and helmed such films as "An Inspector Calls", "The Colditz Story" and "The Devil's Disciple", the latter starring Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas and Laurence Olivier. In 1964 Hamilton was hired to direct the third James Bond film "Goldfinger" and made cinema history. »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

Permalink | Report a problem


Remembering 007 Director Guy Hamilton by Revisiting ‘Goldfinger’

21 April 2016 6:38 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

I seriously doubt that “Goldfinger” was the first Bond movie I saw, but there’s no question it was the one that cemented my love for the franchise — the gold standard against which all subsequent installments would be judged. It’s a good thing I saw it when I was young, too, because in many ways, it’s the hokiest of the series, with self-parody already setting in by the third film — and the first directed by the late Guy Hamilton, who went on to helm three others (“Diamonds Are Forever,” “Live and Let Die” and “The Man with the Golden Gun”).

The film’s pre-credits episode features Bond scuba-diving in to plant a bomb. When he emerges from the water, he’s wearing a “camouflage” helmet featuring a stuffed seagull perched on top — the sort of gag one might expect in a Leslie Nielsen spy-movie send-up, not the real deal. »

- Peter Debruge

Permalink | Report a problem


Guy Hamilton Dies: Four-Time James Bond Director Was 93

21 April 2016 6:27 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Guy Hamilton, who directed four James Bond films in a long and successful career, has died on the Spanish island of Majorca, where he lived. He was 93. He directed Sean Connery and Roger Moore as Bond twice each, first becoming a part of the 007 legend with 1964’s Goldfinger. He would direct Connery again in 1971’s Diamonds are Forever, before overseeing Roger Moore’s as the martini-drinking spy in Live and Let Die (1973) and The Man With the Golden Gun (1974). Roger… »

Permalink | Report a problem


Guy Hamilton, Director of Four James Bond Films, Dies at 93

21 April 2016 6:23 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Guy Hamilton, the British filmmaker who directed four James Bond titles, has died. He was 93. A hospital on the Spanish island of Majorca — where Hamilton lived — confirmed the news to the Associated Press that the director had passed away there on Wednesday. Roger Moore, who Hamilton directed in Live and Let Die and The Man with the Golden Gun, was among the first to pay his respects. Incredibly, incredibly saddened to hear the wonderful director Guy Hamilton has gone to the great cutting room in the sky. 2016 is horrid. — Sir Roger Moore (@sirrogermoore) April 21,

read more

»

- Alex Ritman

Permalink | Report a problem


James Bond Director Guy Hamilton Dies at 93

21 April 2016 6:05 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

London — Guy Hamilton, the director of four James Bond films, has died on the Mediterranean island of Majorca at the age of 93. Hamilton was at the helm of iconic 007 movies “Goldfinger” in 1964 and “Diamonds are Forever” in 1971, both starring Sean Connery, as well as 1973’s “Live and Let Die” and 1974’s “The Man with the Golden Gun,” both with Roger Moore as Bond.

In a statement, Bond producers Barbara Broccoli and Michael G. Wilson told Variety: “We mourn the loss of our dear friend Guy Hamilton who firmly distilled the Bond formula in his much celebrated direction of ‘Goldfinger’ and continued to entertain audiences with ‘Diamonds Are Forever,’ ‘Live and Let Die’ and ‘The Man with the Golden Gun.’ We celebrate his enormous contribution to the Bond films.”

Hamilton’s career started when he was 17 in the accounts department of a film studio in Nice, France, but he soon gravitated to a lowly production role. »

- Leo Barraclough

Permalink | Report a problem


Bond director Guy Hamilton dies aged 93

21 April 2016 5:52 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

BAFTA-nominated British film-maker directed four James Bond films.

British film director Guy Hamilton, known for directing Bond films Goldfinger, Live And Let Die, The Man With The Golden Gun and Diamonds Are Forever, has died aged 93.

Born in Paris in 1922, he made his start as a director’s assistant for Carol Reed on films including The Third Man, before getting his first directing job on 1952 B-movie The Ringer.

Aside from his 007 outings, Hamilton worked consistently until the late 1980s, directing Harrison Ford in Force 10 From Navarone and Michael Caine in The Battle Of Britain, among other credits.

His 1957 feature Stoaway Girl was nominated for a Golden Bear at the Berlin Film Festival, and he received a BAFTA nomination in 1961 for his A Touch of Larceny screenplay.

Roger Moore tweeted: “Incredibly, incredibly saddened to hear the wonderful director Guy Hamilton has gone to the great cutting room in the sky.” »

Permalink | Report a problem


James Bond director Guy Hamilton dies aged 93

21 April 2016 2:50 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Roger Moore among those paying tribute to the film-maker, who was behind four 007 films including Goldfinger and Live and Let Die

British film director Guy Hamilton, known for his work on four key James Bond movies, has died at the age of 93.

The film-maker worked with Sean Connery on Goldfinger and Diamonds are Forever and Roger Moore on Live and Let Die and The Man with the Golden Gun. An “incredibly saddened” Moore has paid tribute on Twitter.

Continue reading »

- Benjamin Lee

Permalink | Report a problem


NYC Weekend Watch: ‘Gimme Shelter,’ ‘Beauty and the Beast,’ ‘The Insider’ & More

11 February 2016 8:57 PM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of the Moving Image

“See It Big! Documentary” has an amazing weekend, starting with The Last Waltz on Friday. Following that are a new restoration of Vertov‘s Man with a Movie Camera (with live musical accompaniment) and a Maysles double-feature of Salesman and Gimme Shelter on Saturday. Sunday offers Errol Morris‘ Fast, Cheap & Out of Control, »

- Nick Newman

Permalink | Report a problem


James Bond 007: revisiting Spectre

24 January 2016 6:14 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

facebook

twitter

google+

We complete our series looking back at the James Bond movies, with a detailed look at Spectre, starring Daniel Craig...

This article contains big spoilers for Spectre and Star Trek Into Darkness.

Daniel Craig’s fourth or Roger Moore’s eighth? The former of course but you get the point. The almost-realistic stylings of early Craig have given way to the full blown pantomime excess of mid-Moore (or late Connery, in fairness). Desert lairs, endless car chases, free-wheelin’ helicopters and indestructible airplanes are all very much back in vogue. The result is a largely enjoyable, extremely silly film which attempts to tie previous Craig outings together at the expense of consistency and logic. There isn’t a plot: more a succession of scenes stitched together. And it still can’t manage a decent finale! Fun but ultimately frivolous. Now who does that remind me of?

The Villain: It’s Blofeld! »

- simonbrew

Permalink | Report a problem


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2002

18 items from 2016


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners