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Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla (1974) Poster

Trivia

This film was the last appearance of the monster Anguirus and only appearance of King Shisa until their long-awaited return 30 years later in Gojira: Fainaru uôzu (2004).
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The only Japanese Godzilla movie that saw a release in Hungary. It had a limited run in cinemas in 1989, but was met with unfavorable reception and was quickly forgotten, so most people believed Roland Emmerich's American Godzilla (1998) to be the first Godzilla flick.
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In the German release of the movie, MechaGodzilla is called King Kong. The reason for this name-change is unknown, although it is likely that the German distributors simply wanted to ride on the actual King Kong's popularity. It is also possible that they have been inspired by the ape-like aliens who control the robot in the movie, or that "King Kong" was simply something of a catch-all term for giant monsters in general. Film historian David Kalat also suggests that the distributors have been confused by the film King Kong Escapes (1967), in which Kong fights a mechanical version of himself, and incorrectly thought that the name "King Kong" referred to the giant robot. It is also of note that another giant robot character, Jet Jaguar from the movie Godzilla vs. Megalon (1973) was also called King Kong in the German dubbing.
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This was the first Godzilla film, in its original Japanese version, to finally give onscreen credit to the suitmation actors with the names of the respective monsters they played. (Up to that point, suitmation actors did receive onscreen credit, but just as regular cast members.) All Toho-produced Godzilla films have since maintained this practice.
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This was produced as Godzilla's 20th Anniversary film (which was also stated in the original Japanese theatrical trailers).
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When Universal Studios, responsible for both the The Six Million Dollar Man (1974) and the The Bionic Woman (1976) threatened to sue Cinema Shares Releasing over the title (Godzilla Vs. the Bionic Monster), the movie was quickly retitled Godzilla vs. the Cosmic Monster.
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This was the last Godzilla film scored by composer Masaru Satô.
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The guardian monster King Shisa is based on the actual "shîsâ" lion-dog guardian statues in Okinawa. Originally from China, they are statues that ward off evil spirits. Another Japanese name for them is "komainu" (lion-dog).
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This is the last Godzilla film directed by Jun Fukuda.
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This was Hiroshi Koizumi's final appearance in the classic Godzilla film series (the Showa Series). He would return in Godzilla 1985 (1984), the first film in the VS Series (AKA: Heisei Series).
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The metal in the bowl of Professor Miyajima (Akihiko Hirata)'s magnetic pipe is made of a fictional element called Astanopkaron ("Asutanopukaron" in Japanese), which was made up just for this film.
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The cavern in which the Third Planet Aliens have their secret base is the Gyokusen Cave, a real cave in Okinawa, and also a tourist attraction.
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The ferry Shimizu (Masaaki Daimon) and Saeko (Reiko Tajima) travel in to get to Okinawa is called the Sunflower Sapporo, which is a real-life (and still active, as of 2013) ferry. The original owners, Nippon High-Speed Ferries (Nippon Kôsoku Fêrî), was one of this film's sponsors.
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The main objective of Teruyoshi Nakano, director of special effects, was to show that Godzilla movies could be as exciting and boisterous as the popular and more expensive American effects-films of the time. Hence all the focus on big and colorful explosions in the movie.
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