The Godfather: Part II
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

17 items from 2015

‘Creed’: Can Stallone Make History?

25 November 2015 6:00 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Patrick Shanley

Managing Editor

Creed, the latest film in the Rocky franchise, opens today bolstered by a 95% rating on Rotten Tomatoes. The film is anchored by strong performances from 28-year-old Michael B. Jordan, who stars as boxer Adonis Johnson, the son of late boxer and former Rocky Balboa rival, Apollo Creed, and Sylvester Stallone, who returns for the seventh time to the role that earned him the only two Oscar nominations in his career and made him a star nearly 40 years ago.

39 years ago, in 1976, Stallone premiered the first film in the pugilistic franchise and it paid off in big dividends for the then-30-year-old actor. In addition to a best actor nomination that year, Stallone also earned a nomination for best original screenplay, becoming only the third person in history to earn nominations for both starring in and writing the same film. If that wasn’t enough, the »

- Patrick Shanley

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‘Brooklyn’: Oscar and the Immigrant Story

4 November 2015 3:00 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Patrick Shanley

Managing Editor

Hollywood Film Award winner and Vancouver International Film Festival’s Audience Award recipient, Brooklyn, opens in theaters today. The film centers on a young Irish immigrant (Saoirse Ronan) coming to America in the 1950’s and her struggles with adapting to a new country and leaving behind her homeland.

The film’s setting and subject matter may hit close to home with many Academy voters who grew up in that time period and can relate to the immigrant story. Coupled with the fact that the film is distributed by Fox Searchlight, which was behind both of the last two best picture winners (12 Years a Slave, Birdman), it seems destined for Oscar success. It is not the only movie this year that may spark nostalgic sentimentality in Academy voters, however.

Here’s a look at a few films from Oscars history that dealt with the subject of »

- Patrick Shanley

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77 Reasons Christopher Lloyd Is Awesome, in Honor of His 77th Birthday

22 October 2015 1:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Happy 77th birthday to one of our favorite actors, Christopher Lloyd!

The actor, who's played some of filmdom's most beloved characters, including Doc Brown in "Back to the Future," Professor Plum in "Clue," and Uncle Fester in the "Addams Family" films, was born on October 22, 1938 in Stamford, Conn.

Partly because of his height, and partly because of his manic intensity and commitment to even the wildest characters, he's portrayed a series of eccentrics, from mad scientists to aliens; had an impressive, award-winning theater career; and will always be remembered as Reverend Jim on "Taxi."

In honor of his 77th birthday, we've come up with 75 reasons why he's so awesome.

1. He's played a Klingon, a cartoon, the Wizard of Oz, an angel, a leper, and a geriatric vampire.

2. He stands an impressive 6'1."

3. Because he's so tall, he had to hunch over to appear in the same frame with "Back to the Future »

- Sharon Knolle

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Watch: This Stunning Supercut Sequel Contrasts the First and Final Shots of Your Favorite Films

7 October 2015 10:08 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: Watch: This Movie Phone Supercut is a Comical Cinematic Conference Call When Jacob T. Swinney posted a supercut of the first and final shots of 55 of the most beautiful films, the result was pure bliss for every cinephile. While it's a slight shame that Swinney already used up "The Godfather: Part II" in his original video, his heavily requested sequel is finally here and it is equally awe-inspiring. In the above video, "First and Final Frames Part Two," Swinney offers us moving glimpses at the bookends of 70 new films from visually masterful filmmakers such as Terence Malick, Jim Jarmusch and Alejandro González Iñárritu. Through this side-by-side comparison of these first and last shots, we once again get to appreciate the subtle craft of filmmaking. Occasionally, the images are complementary and the similarities are profound. The symmetry is simply sublime, for instance, in the first and last frames of. »

- Tarek Shoukri

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Beyond Fright review: Dog Day Afternoon (40th Anniversary Bluray)

20 September 2015 4:42 PM, PDT | | See recent Icons of Fright news »

I’m a massive fan of heist films. There’s just something so entertaining and gripping as sitting down and watching films like Heat, Reservoir Dogs, or in this case, Dog Day Afternoon. Easily one of my favorite subgenres of film, films like the ones mentioned above were all able to not only tell a very tightly wound tale, but offered their viewers characters that leaped off of the screen Every Single Time you revisited them. Sidney Lumet’s 1975 classic Dog Day Afternoon gave its viewers a wild ride of a film, and one that offered its audience something entirely different, from its ability to sympathize with its antagonists all the way to its true story of a man robbing a bank to pay for his lover’s sex change. It’s a completely unique and lasting film, and not only does Warner Bros.’ new 40th Anniversary Bluray give fans »

- Jerry Smith

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9 Famous Actors Without Stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

9 July 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | | See recent Backstage news »

Since the 1960s, the Hollywood Walk of Fame has become a marker of sorts of who’s made it in American entertainment. Everyone from Bette Davis to Greta Garbo to Pee-wee Herman is represented—and yet, there are many who are not.  To earn a star on Hollywood Boulevard, however, isn’t just about fame and power. You have to raise $30,000, express your desire to have a star (and promise you’ll attend its unveiling), and wow the selection committee, among other requirements.  For one reason or another, the following influential actors don’t have stars with their names on them. Robert De NiroCan you believe two-time Oscar winner De Niro, best known for “The Godfather: Part II,” “Goodfellas,” “Casino,” and “Taxi Driver,” does not have a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame? Aside from his legendary performances, De Niro founded the Tribeca Film Festival in NYC, and has »

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Steven Soderbergh Picks 11 Favorite Films

1 July 2015 1:41 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

This vintage list dates back to 1989, when Steven Soderbergh was hot off his debut indie sensation "Sex, Lies and Videotape," which managed the rare feat of scoring the Palme d'Or after already premiering (and winning) at Sundance. Then in his mid-20s, Soderbergh was already well-read in the American classics. And now, after dozens of features and TV's "The Knick" and all but directing this weekend's "Magic Mike" sequel, he ranks with most of the names you see below. (Hat tip: The Film Stage.) Read More: Why "Magic Mike Xxl" Is Still a Soderbergh Movie "All the President's Men" (Alan J. Pakula, 1976) "Annie Hall" (Woody Allen, 1977) "Citizen Kane" (Orson Welles, 1941) "The Conversation" (Francis Ford Coppola, 1974) "The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T" (Roy Rowland, 1953) "The Godfather" (Francis Ford Coppola, 1972) "The Godfather: Part II" (Francis Ford Coppola, »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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Oscar-Nominated Film Series: Poorly Cast Hoffman as Polemical Stand-Up Comic and Free Speech Advocate in Timorous Biopic

4 June 2015 6:10 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Lenny Bruce: Dustin Hoffman in the 1974 Bob Fosse movie. Lenny Bruce movie review: Polemical stand-up comedian merited less timid biopic (Oscar Movie Series) Bob Fosse's 1974 biopic Lenny has two chief assets: the ever relevant free speech issues it raises and the riveting presence of Valerie Perrine. The film itself, however, is only sporadically thought-provoking or emotionally gripping; in fact, Lenny is a major artistic letdown, considering all the talent involved and the fertile material at hand. After all, much more should have come out of a joint effort between director Fosse, fresh off his Academy Award win for Cabaret; playwright-screenwriter Julian Barry, whose stage version of Lenny earned Cliff Gorman a Tony Award; two-time Best Actor Oscar nominee Dustin Hoffman (The Graduate, Midnight Cowboy); and cinematographer Bruce Surtees (Play Misty for Me, Blume in Love). Their larger-than-life subject? Lenny Bruce, the stand-up comedian who became one of the »

- Andre Soares

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Pitch Perfect 2 Strains to Hit the Same Notes

12 May 2015 9:00 PM, PDT | Village Voice | See recent Village Voice news »

Some people complain about sequels to beloved movies, while others welcome the possibility that a part deux might be even better than the first. Sometimes that happens: While The Godfather is great, The Godfather: Part II expands on its dramatic intensity without repeating any of the same tricks, and The Empire Strikes Back is a much more operatic and emotionally complex picture than Star Wars. Jason Moore’s Pitch Perfect, which riffed on the highs and lows of an all-woman college a cappella group, became a surprise hit upon its release in 2012. It was a cheerful, straightforward picture, about Being Who You Are, Finding New Love, and Singing Out Loud. And really, who doesn’t love singing? Especially a cappella singing, in which huma »

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Oscar-Nominated Film Series: Early Morphine Addiction Drama Marred by Several Hammy Performances

11 May 2015 2:22 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'A Hatful of Rain' with Lloyd Nolan, Anthony Franciosa and Don Murray 'A Hatful of Rain' script fails to find cinematic voice as most of the cast hams it up Based on a play by Michael V. Gazzo, A Hatful of Rain is an interesting attempt at injecting "adult" subject matters – in this case, the evils of drug addiction – into Hollywood movies. "Interesting," however, does not mean either successful or compelling. Despite real, unromantic New York City locations and Joseph MacDonald's beautifully realistic black-and-white camera work (and the pointless use of CinemaScope), this Fred Zinnemann-directed melodrama feels anachronistically stagy as a result of its artificial dialogue and the hammy theatricality of its performers – with Eva Marie Saint as the sole naturalistic exception. 'A Hatful of Rain' synopsis Somewhat revolutionary in its day (Otto Preminger's The Man with a Golden Arm,* also about drug addiction, »

- Andre Soares

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Time Machine: Veterans Wallach and Coppola - Godfather 3 in Common - Are Special Oscar Honorees

24 April 2015 12:28 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson on the Oscars' Red Carpet Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson at the Academy Awards Eli Wallach and wife Anne Jackson are seen above arriving at the 2011 Academy Awards ceremony, held on Sunday, Feb. 27, at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. The 95-year-old Wallach had received an Honorary Oscar at the Governors Awards in November 2010. See also: "Doris Day Inexplicably Snubbed by Academy," "Maureen O'Hara Honorary Oscar," "Honorary Oscars: Mary Pickford, Greta Garbo Among Rare Women Recipients," and "Hayao Miyazaki Getting Honorary Oscar." Delayed film debut The Actors Studio-trained Eli Wallach was to have made his film debut in Fred Zinnemann's Academy Award-winning 1953 blockbuster From Here to Eternity. Ultimately, however, Frank Sinatra – then a has-been following a string of box office duds – was cast for a pittance, getting beaten to a pulp by a pre-stardom Ernest Borgnine. For his bloodied efforts, Sinatra went on »

- D. Zhea

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Joss Whedon interview: Avengers, Marvel, Titan A.E.

22 April 2015 11:32 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Joss Whedon chats to us about Avengers: Age Of Ultron, Jason Statham, what he's up to next, and more...

Joss Whedon: assembler of Avengers, slayer of vampires, houser of dolls, vlogger of Doctor Horrible, and now, um, ageist of Ultron. To be fair, Joss Whedon is geek royalty, and needs no introduction. So hopefully, he won’t mind that we gave him such a naff one.

We got to chat with the man himself at the Avengers: Age Of Ultron press event, and here’s what happened...

From what we’ve heard about this one, it sounds like you had to trim down a lot in the editing room. Was there any particular favourite scene you wish you could have saved?

Well, there was more shirtless Thor. The DVD extras are going to be enormously popular. But no, for me, it’s really a couple of little exchanges that »

- rleane

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From Actor to "Action!", Exploring the Debuts of 19 Actors-Turned-Directors

21 April 2015 10:30 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Over the course of film history, we've seen plenty of long-time actors step behind the camera to take up their directorial ambitions. Clint Eastwood did it. Mel Gibson did it. George Clooney did it. What do these three have in commonc Well, for starters, they are all men, so there's that. Further, they are all white, but more on that later. More to the point of the article, these men all eased into their directorial careers by starring in their respective debuts, using their presence on screen to help market their talents off it. And with his feature directorial effort The Water Diviner, which hits limited theaters this week, Russell Crowe is just the most recent addition to a growing list of actors who have decided to try their hand behind the camera. Like Eastwood, Gibson, and Clooney before him, the Best Actor winner stars in his first feature as director, »

- Jordan Benesh

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Check Out Laurent Durieux's New 'The Godfather: Part II' Art Print

2 March 2015 11:56 AM, PST | | See recent news »

"When he grows, he will grow strong." Better than Part 1? It's an endless debate... Which is better - The Godfather: Part 1 or Part 2? Well, if you're partial to Part 2, you might want to take a look at this. French artist Laurent Durieux has created a new screen print for Francis Ford Coppola's iconic 1974 sequel The Godfather: Part II. Odd City Entertainment will be releasing the print in limited quantities starting this week, including a special edition printed on wood (!) with 12 colors that will go for $300. Again, might be worth it if you're partial to Part 2. This is one gorgeous poster and the quote at the bottom really tops it off. Here's a full look at the art by Durieux, debuted by Collider. Top version is the regular edition at $65 each. This is the variant below, which features Italian lettering. The wood version will not be using this variant. »

- Alex Billington

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Earth’s Mightiest Heroes Are Up Against It In Official Avengers: Age Of Ultron Poster

24 February 2015 9:57 AM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Marvel Studios has lifted the curtain on the official poster for Joss Whedon’s anticipated superhero sequel, Avengers: Age of Ultron, which sees Earth’s Mightiest Heroes come up against an army of malicious androids.

Perhaps the most interesting tidbit to come out of the poster is confirmation that Anthony Mackie will reprise his role as Sam Wilson (Falcon), though it remains to be seen just how much screen time will be afforded to Captain America’s number two.

Elsewhere on the poster, eagle-eyed fans will be able to spot newcomers in the form of Quicksilver and Scarlet Witch, not to mention Paul Bettany’s The Vision. Aside from that, it’s business as usual for the dysfunctional family, with Hulk, Thor, Iron Man, Black Widow, Hawkeye and Samuel L. Jackson’s Nick Fury rounding out the cast.

Earlier this week, we learned that Avengers: Age of Ultron will boast »

- Michael Briers

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Walter Murch to receive Locarno honour

4 February 2015 10:24 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Triple Oscar-winner to be honoured with the Vision Award.

The 68th Locarno Film Festival (Aug 5-15) is to give its Vision Award - Nescens to award-winning editor and sound designer Walter Murch. The award has previously been given to special effects wizard Douglas Trumbull and “Mister Steadicam” Garrett Brown.

Murch worked with George Lucas on Thx 1138 (1971) and American Graffiti (1973) and Francis Ford Coppola on The Rain People (1969), The Godfather (1972), The Conversation (1974) and The Godfather: Part II (1974).

His work with Coppola as sound designer on Apocalypse Now won him his first Oscar in 1980.

Following his own directorial debut in 1985 with Return to Oz, he subsequently won two more Academy Awards for both sound and film editing on Anthony Minghella’s The English Patient (1996) – the first and only time in history the same person has won the Oscar in both categories. In this respect he was repeating an earlier record set when he won double BAFTA awards in 1975 for »

- (Michael Rosser)

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Watch: AFI Awards 2014 Montage

12 January 2015 10:21 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

The American Film Institute is probably best known for those lists of the 100 Greatest Movies of All Time (y'know... if it's an American production in some way). Well, every year they hold their own awards, because every group of people has to have awards. They recognize the ten best films (for this year, it's eleven due to a tie) and the ten best television programs of the year. There are not winners in these categories, but each one gets celebrated. On that front, I kind of like the AFI approach to awards. Along with the awards, AFI has put together this four and a half minute montage chronicling the last 120 years of film. Now, it would be ridiculous to cover every single year. Instead, they start with 1894's Strong Man and jump every ten years, showcasing films like Rear Window, The Godfather: Part II, Pulp Fiction, and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind »

- Mike Shutt

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