Freebie and the Bean (1974) - News Poster

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Freebie and the Bean

Here’s how one pushed the limits of good taste in 1974. James Caan and Alan Arkin run the gamut of racist, raunchy, sexist & homophobic jokes as bad boy cops breaking the rules, and director Richard Rush delivers some impressive, expensive action stunts on location in San Francisco. Does it get a pass because it’s ‘outrageous?’ The public surely thought so. If the star chemistry works the excess won’t matter. With Valerie Harper, Loretta Swit and Jack Kruschen.

Freebie and the Bean

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1974 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 113 min. / Street Date August 8, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Alan Arkin, James Caan, Valerie Harper, Loretta Swit, Jack Kruschen, Mike Kellin, Paul Koslo, Linda Marsh, Alex Rocco.

Cinematography: Laszlo Kovacs

Film Editors: Michael MacLean, Fredric Steinkamp

Original Music: Dominic Frontiere

Written by Robert Kaufman, Floyd Mutrux

Produced and Directed by Richard Rush

‘Buddy’ pictures have been around forever, but I
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Gumball Rally

Cars! Cars! Cars! What climate accord, when we’re celebrating the internal combustion engine! One of the best of the breezy ’70s action comedies, this cross-country road race picture gave us early looks at Gary Busey and Raul Julia in the midst of an always-amusing ensemble of car crazies, out to go from Manhattan to the Pacific in less than two days, at speeds up 175 mph! No 55 speed limit, no catalytic converters!

The Gumball Rally

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1976 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 107 min. / Street Date June 13, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Michael Sarrazin, Raul Julia, Norman Burton, Gary Busey, John Durren, Susan Flannery, Harvey Jason, Steven Keats,

Tim McIntire, Joanne Nail, J. Pat O’Malley, Tricia O’Neil, Nicholas Pryor, Vaughn Taylor, Wally Taylor, Colleen Camp, Lazaro Perez, Med Flory, Lauren Simon, .

Cinematography: Richard C. Glouner

Film Editors: Stuart H. Pappé Gordon Scott, Maury Wintrobe

Original Music: Dominic Frontiere

Written by Chuck Bail,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

"El Dorado": The Dawn of Caan

It takes a lot to stand out when you’re standing between Robert Mitchum and John Wayne. And it surely isn’t easy when you’re also standing in front of the venerable Howard Hawks. But this was the position 25-year-old James Caan found himself in when he took on the role of Alan Bourdillon Traherne, otherwise known as Mississippi, in Hawks’ 1967 Western, El Dorado. Though Hawks was nearing the end of his filmmaking career (this would be his penultimate movie) and Caan was just at the start of his (following two features and about five years of extensive television work), they were each entering the project under similar circumstances. Indeed, it was their shared experience on the disappointing Red Line 7000 (1965) that left them both wanting. It may have been a personal letdown for Caan, but that film’s poor reception wasn’t a deal-breaker as far as his prospects were likely to continue.
See full article at MUBI »

The In-Laws

This Alan Arkin-Peter Falk show is finally being recognized as a comedy mini-masterpiece. Afraid of offending his daughter's future father-in-law, a dentist is sucked into a nightmare of crime and jeopardy, as a jolly Chinese airline whisks him away to a rendezvous with danger in a Latin American dictatorship. It's a gem of sustained mirth. The In-Laws Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 823 1979 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 103 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date July 5, 2016 / 39.95 Starring Peter Falk, Alan Arkin, Richard Libertini, Nancy Dussault, Penny Peyser, Arlene Golonka, Michael Lembeck, Paul Lawrence Smith, Ed Begley Jr., James Hong, Barbara Dana, David Paymer. Cinematography David M. Walsh Film Editor Robert E. Swink Original Music John Morris Written by Andrew Bergman Produced by Arthur Miller, William Sackheim Directed by Arthur Hiller

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Good grief, I had no idea that Albert Brooks and Michael Douglas remade this movie back in
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Nice Guys review: Crowe and Gosling are abysmal PIs in a high hit-rate action comedy

Shane Black sets a pair of sound-hearted good-bad guys off on the trail of a missing porn star in a crime caper that’s touched by Anderson, Altman and Hiaasen

Before our emotionally literate, twenty-first century world invented the idea of the “bromance”, we had the buddy comedy: films like California Split, Freebie And The Bean, not to mention Roger Moore and Tony Curtis in The Persuaders on television. Writer-director Shane Black’s horribly enjoyable action comedy The Nice Guys is an jauntily arch return to this tradition, the story of two dishevelled and incompetent private detectives in 1970s Los Angeles — played by Russell Crowe and Ryan Gosling — who have been expensively tasked with solving the mystery surrounding the death of a missing porn actress, and what other kind of fascinatingly damaged female character can there be? It’s a comedy hardboiled noir, a plastic Black Dahlia with something of Pt Anderson’s Boogie Nights,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘The Nice Guys’ Cannes Review: Ryan Gosling and Russell Crowe Are Violently Funny in Occasionally Sour Comedy

  • The Wrap
‘The Nice Guys’ Cannes Review: Ryan Gosling and Russell Crowe Are Violently Funny in Occasionally Sour Comedy
From the opening shot of the crumbling Hollywood sign, it’s clear that “The Nice Guys” is going to be director Shane Black‘s attempt to capture not only the shabby decadence of 1977 Los Angeles, but also the grimy, down-and-dirty feel of decade-defining cop comedies like “Freebie and the Bean.” (Black knows a thing or two about decade-defining cop comedies, having revitalized the genre with “Lethal Weapon,” which spawned plenty of sequels and copycats in the 1980s.) But there’s a tipping point at which comedy goes from black to bilious, and that’s a balancing act that “The Nice Guys” doesn’t always nail.
See full article at The Wrap »

John Michael Mcdonagh declares 'War On Everyone'

  • Cinelinx
The Guard and Calvary were two of my favorite films to release in their respective years. Both reel with a jet black sense of humor and western style morality play where various shades of grey face off in cessation. They also happen to be gorgeous, shot by Larry Smith (Gaffer/Chief electrician on Barry Lyndon/The Shining turned Only God Forgives/Bronson D.P) and composed in sickening symmetry. In short, I was ecstastic to meet the man behind it all, and his down to earth, silly, demeanor, ended up putting me at ease. John Michael McDonagh, talks about his third and bleakest feature film: War On Everyone.

Did anything, such as something in the media, provoke the start of War On Everyone?

There was no sort of big initializing point really. I guess having done The Guard with one kind of obnoxious cop, [that] I wanted to double down on that a little bit.
See full article at Cinelinx »

Sliff 2015 Review – Silver Skies

Silver Skies screens Sunday November 8th at 6:45pm at The Tivoli Theater as part of this year’s St. Louis International Film Festival. The film’s director, Rosemary Rodriguez, will be in attendance and will receive Sliff’s ‘Women in Film’ Award.Ticket information for the event can be found Here

Review by Dana Jung.

Today, more than ever, with our shortened attention spans, inundation by multi-media delivery systems, and almost obsessive need for instant information, it is easy to forget the wonderful actors of the 1960s, 70s, and 80s who inspired and influenced us. So many great moments created by sometimes iconic performers live on in the movies and television of certain eras. From Mr. Spock to Archie Bunker, Annie Hall to James Bond, or Mrs. Peel to Lieutenant Columbo, these and other memorable characters fueled everything from fashion choices to sexual fantasies. That’s why the new
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Junkfood Cinema Podcast: Freebie and The Bean

It’s with much defiance that Cargill and I tender our badges and guns and close the book on Buddy Cop July. But before we march out of the precinct, hellbent on solving the case with or without permission, we offer up a bizarre parting shot! 1974’s Freebie and the Bean is a great movie, if completely bonkers and more than a little offensive. Alan Arkin and James Caan play possibly the worst “good guys” ever to supposedly be charged with serving and protecting. The two actors, like rogue cops, refused to play by even the director’s rules and the result is one of those insanely rare occurrences in which the performers are making a completely different movie from the filmmaker…and it works! Ride along with us! You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #67 Directly On This Week’s Show: Pre-Ramble [0:00 – 1:49] Bean There [1:50 – 49:24] Done That [49:25 – 53:16] Films Discussed: [Click to buy, help us keep the lights on] Get In
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Good-bye, Alex And Mary

It’s definitely been a week for good-byes.

My daughters and I spent the weekend in the beautiful, still somewhat quaint small town of Auburn, California, helping to lay to rest and celebrate the life of my dear aunt Mary Pascuzzi, my fraternal grandmother’s sister, who was the centered matriarch of her own family and a stabilizing force for all of us in her extended family as well. She, and my grandmother, were big fans of classic-era American movies and enthusiastically encouraged my interest, just one reason why they’re both held dear in my heart and in my memory. And being Italian, they both had more than a casual interest in The Godfather when it came out in 1972. I remember my aunt Mary talking to me about having seen it and wondering, me at the ripe old age of 12, if I’d had a chance to go yet.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Alex Rocco, Emmy-winning Actor, Dead At Age 79

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Alex Rocco, whose hard scrabble life on the streets of Boston prepared him to successfully play crime figures in films and on television, has died from pancreatic cancer at age 79. During his youth, Rocco ran with the notorious Winter Hill Gang, which was founded by the infamous Whitey Bulger. His association with the gang led him to be incarcerated as well as being suspected of having driven a getaway car used in a murder. At one point, his first wife was almost killed when a bomb exploded in a car she was driving. Rocco, who was born Alexander Petricone Jr, took the stage name of "Rocco" on a whim when he saw a bakery truck bearing the Rocco name on it. Fearing that his associations of the Boston mob would lead to his demise, he spontaneously decided to move to Hollywood. He took an acting class that was taught by Leonard Nimoy,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Alex Rocco, Character Actor in ‘Godfather,’ ‘Facts of Life,’ Dies at 79

Alex Rocco, Character Actor in ‘Godfather,’ ‘Facts of Life,’ Dies at 79
Character actor Alex Rocco, who played casino owner Moe Greene in “The Godfather” and appeared in dozens of other movies and TV shows, died Saturday of cancer in Studio City, Calif. He was 79.

Often appearing as a heavy, hood or cop, in “The Godfather,” he had the famous line, “Do you know who I am?” Recently he had a recurring role in Starz’s “Magic City” and appeared on “Episodes” and “Maron.” His daughter Jennifer Rocco reported his death on her Facebook page.

He appeared in several episodes of 1980s TV show “The Facts of Life” as Charlie Polniaczek, and had recurring roles on other shows including “Starsky and Hutch” and “The Famous Teddy Z,” for which he won a supporting actor Emmy in 1990. He did voices for animated shows including “The Simpsons,” for which he voiced the executive who made Itchy and Scratchy cartoons, and “Family Guy.”

His film
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Alex Rocco, Character Actor in ‘Godfather,’ ‘Facts of Life,’ Dies at 79

Alex Rocco, Character Actor in ‘Godfather,’ ‘Facts of Life,’ Dies at 79
Character actor Alex Rocco, who played casino owner Moe Greene in “The Godfather” and appeared in dozens of other movies and TV shows, died Saturday of cancer in Studio City, Calif. He was 79.

Often appearing as a heavy, hood or cop, in “The Godfather,” he had the famous line, “Do you know who I am?” Recently he had a recurring role in Starz’s “Magic City” and appeared on “Episodes” and “Maron.” His daughter Jennifer Rocco reported his death on her Facebook page.

He appeared in several episodes of 1980s TV show “The Facts of Life” as Charlie Polniaczek, and had recurring roles on other shows including “Starsky and Hutch” and “The Famous Teddy Z,” for which he won a supporting actor Emmy in 1990. He did voices for animated shows including “The Simpsons,” for which he voiced the executive who made Itchy and Scratchy cartoons, and “Family Guy.”

His film
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Top Ten Tuesday – Top 10 Guilty Pleasure Movies

I have a curious habit, maybe you have it too, if you are a real movie geek, film fan, cinema addict, what have you.

A certain number of movies that I have seen and loved with all my heart were losers at the box office or were mercilessly slammed by critics, usually both. This doesn’t happen all the time, mind you. I know a bad movie when I see one. But several times I have seen a movie on opening day and loved it so much I was sure it would be a big hit and be loved by critics and film goers, nope, not all the time.

Here then is my own personal and highly eccentric top ten list, with some honorable mentions, of movies that lost out, yet I love them still, many of them desperately, hysterically, madly do I love these films, well anyway… let me tell you about it.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Bill Paxton and Alan Arkin Discuss Baseball, Sc-Fi, 'Twister,' and Workplace Etiquette

Talking to two people on the phone is always weird, but it's even weirder when the two people you're talking to are both very, very silly. This is what happened when I got on the phone to chat with two of the stars of Disney's terrific new sports movie "Million Dollar Arm": Bill Paxton and Alan Arkin.

In the film, Jon Hamm's sports agent concocts a seemingly ludicrous plan to drum up interest -- he travels to India to recruit two young, nonprofessional cricket players to compete in a pitching contest worth a million dollars and a professional baseball contract. The kids, of course, have no idea what American baseball is or, for that matter, what America is, but he tries just the same. Paxton plays Tom House, a USC coach who agrees to help train the boys, and Alan Arkin plays Ray Poitevint, a scout who accompanies
See full article at Moviefone »

Tgb Episode 188: The Legendary Kevin Costner Talk (Guest: Kevin Carr)

On this week's episode of The Golden Briefcase, Tim and Jeremy are joined by guest Kevin Carr from Fat Guys at the Movies and Film School Rejects to go through their latest picks of the week, the newest DVD & Blu-ray releases and much more. The main topic of the night was a discussion on the fascinating acting career of Kevin Costner, in honor of his new action film 3 Days to Kill hitting theaters this week. The guys talk over Costner's busy career, some of his best and, of course, worst performances ever, then wrap up the evening by discussing if/what Kevin Costner should do next in the realms of acting and directing. Listen in! Download #188 or Listen Now: [audio href="http://traffic.libsyn.com/firstshowing/EP188.mp3" title="The Legendary Kevin Costner Talk (Guest: Kevin Carr)"]The Golden Briefcase #188/audio] Subscribe via: RSS or iTunes Previous Episode: Of Machines and Men (Guest: Brian Salisbury) Our Guest: Kevin Carr: @kevincarr Picks of the Week: Jeremy: Freebie and the Bean
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Black Out | Review

Black and Mild: Toonen’s High Octane Adaptation a Bit Derivative

If you could imagine The Hangover remade as a drug fueled action thriller with stylizations that mimic rather than pay homage to early Guy Ritchie flicks, then you’d have something like Aren Toonen’s sophomore film, Black Out on your hands. While it’s slickly paced, this Dutch adaptation of a Swedish novel by Gerben Hellinga may satisfy pulp hounds that prize quick cuts and torrential tangents of backstory and flashback to insistently command their wandering attention, but there’s not much by way of innovation. Sexy babes with tough attitudes and nonsensical outfits stretch the limits of its tenuous believability, but its hyperkinetic design reveals the film to be a simple sugar, a quick burn whose buzz wears off well before the end credits.

Waking up next to a bloodied corpse in his bed, Jos Vreeswijk (Raymond Thiry
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Warner Bros Launches Streaming Service For Old Movies And TV Shows

  • Deadline TV
The studio quietly launched WB Archive Instant. According to the website, it enables subscribers who pay $9.99 a month opportunities to watch what the company calls “rare and hard-to-find” content. The moldy oldie movies include The Americanization Of Emily, A Face In The Crowd, Freebie And The Bean, and Black Legion. TV shows include The Adventures Of Superman, 77 Sunset Strip, and Cheyenne. New users can try the Warner Bros service two weeks for free. But for now it’s just available on PCs and Macs — no mobile devices — and televisions connected to a Roku box. Only the Roku can handle HD streams.
See full article at Deadline TV »

Lead Actors: The Overlooked and Underrated

This article is dedicated to Andrew Copp: filmmaker, film writer, artist and close friend who passed away on January 19, 2013. You are loved and missed, brother.

****

Looking at the Best Actor Academy Award nominations for the film year 2012, the one miss that clearly cries out for more attention is Liam Neeson’s powerful performance in Joe Carnahan’s excellent survival film The Grey, easily one of the best roles of Neeson’s career.

In Neeson’s case, his lack of a nomination was a case of neglect similar to the Albert Brooks snub in the Best Supporting Actor category for the film year 2011 for Drive(Nicolas Winding Refn, USA).

Along with negligence, other factors commonly prevent outstanding lead acting performances from getting the kind of critical attention they deserve. Sometimes it’s that the performance is in a film not considered “Oscar material” or even worthy of any substantial critical attention.
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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