Coonskin (1975) - News Poster

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New Details on The Sims 4 Console Version Released

  • Cinelinx
The Sims is one of those series that everybody has heard of and probably dabbled in at one time or another. However, while the newest installment in the series, The Sims 4, has been out for a long time, it's only been available for PC gamers. Well, the wait is over and The Sims 4 is making its way to consoles! Check out this article for more of what to expect from The Sims 4's console debut.

The Sims has long since been one of my favorite series of games. I remember my first experience with The Sims was through The Sims Bustin' Out on the PlaysStation 2. It wasn't as expansive as the PC installment, but I loved it all the same. Years later I still enjoy The Sims on my PC, but the console versions have come a long way too. This console release of The Sims 4 looks like it's going
See full article at Cinelinx »

‘Sausage Party’: Why Seth Rogen’s R-Rated Animated Comedy Was Long Overdue

‘Sausage Party’: Why Seth Rogen’s R-Rated Animated Comedy Was Long Overdue
Sausage Party” may be a film about a hotdog that wants to have sex with a bun, but it still represents a watershed moment for Hollywood. The raunchy comedy that’s grossed $65 million after two weeks in theaters is the first R-rated CG animated movie. Co-written by Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg, “Sausage Party” has sex, violence and curse words in a format that has always been reserved for family-friendly fare.

Read More: Seth Rogen’s R-Rated ‘Sausage Party’ Tries to Break Through the Family-Friendly Animation Glass Ceiling

The movie features the voices of comedic stars like Rogen, Jonah Hill, Kristen Wiig, James Franco and Paul Rudd playing anthropomorphized food items who discover their only reason for existing is to be eaten by humans. Directors Conrad Vernon (“Monsters vs. Aliens”) and Greg Tiernan (TV’s “Thomas & Friends”) have backgrounds in traditional animation aimed at children, but there’s nothing traditional about this deranged dark comedy.
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: Ralph Bakshi’s Last Days Of Coney Island

Long overdue swansong (?) from the master of gritty hand-drawn urban animation. Ralph Bakshi defined the animated back alley scuzz look of 1970s NYC, spoiling with grit, dirt and counter-culture grime, in his iconic classics Fritz The Cat, Heavy Traffic, Coonskin, and American Pop before shifting tone to fantasy fiction with Wizards and Lord Of…

The post Review: Ralph Bakshi’s Last Days Of Coney Island appeared first on Shock Till You Drop.
See full article at shocktillyoudrop »

Tim's Toons review: Last Days of Coney Island

Tim here. One of the most important events in animation in all of 2015 happened this week; it is important to stress that this doesn't mean it's also one of the best things. But the first new piece of animation from living legend Ralph Bakshi in almost 20 years is certainly worth spending a moment with, though now that I've seen the 22-minute Last Days of Coney Island – currently available for rental on Vimeo, where it just had its world premiere – I can't really claim that I want to stretch that moment out too long.

The film finds Bakshi, whose 77th birthday was October 29, returning to the territory of his most characteristic works from the early 1970s, including Heavy Traffic, the infamous race relations fable Coonskin, and his groundbreaking debut, Fritz the Cat. That is, it's a story about the New York City of Bakshi's battle-hardened memories of youth, involving deeply
See full article at FilmExperience »

Ralph Bakshi’s Animated Film ‘Last Days of Coney Island’ to Be Released on Vimeo

Ralph Bakshi’s Animated Film ‘Last Days of Coney Island’ to Be Released on Vimeo
Director Ralph Bakshi is launching his new animated film, “Last Days of Coney Island,” on Oct. 29 — his 77th birthday — with an exclusive release on Vimeo on Demand, Variety has learned exclusively.

The national release of “Last Days of Coney Island” follows a Kickstarter campaign that raised more than $174,000 from 1,290 backers.

Bakshi created, directed and mostly animated the 22-minute movie, described as a mafia horror pic set in the 1960s in Coney Island with political overtones both realistic and outrageous, and a violent collage of characters, all striving to get somewhere.

Bakshi’s career includes directing the animated films “Fritz The Cat,” “Heavy Traffic,” “Coonskin,” “Wizards,” “The Lord of the Rings,” “American Pop” and “Fire and Ice,” and the TV series “Mighty Mouse: The New Adventures.” “Fritz the Cat” was the first animated film to be accepted at the Cannes Film Festival.

“Last Days of Coney Island” is produced by Edward Bakshi.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Busta Rhymes Arrested, Charged With Assault for Throwing Protein Drink in NYC Gym Fight

Busta Rhymes Arrested, Charged With Assault for Throwing Protein Drink in NYC Gym Fight
Bustin' out... the protein powder. "Dangerous" rapper Busta Rhymes was arrested and charged with assault on Wednesday, Aug. 5, after getting into a fight at a gym in NYC. Rhymes (nee Trevor Tahiem Smith Jr.) — who's known for his hits like "Gimme Some More" has been accused of throwing a protein drink at an employee who worked at Steel Gym in Manhattan's Chelsea nabe. A New York Police Department spokesperson told Us Weekly that Rhymes and the employee were already arguing about something when their interaction turned [...]
See full article at Us Weekly »

Robert Taylor, Director of ‘Nine Lives of Fritz the Cat,’ Dies at 70

Robert Taylor, Director of  ‘Nine Lives of Fritz the Cat,’ Dies at 70
Robert “Bob” Taylor, an award-winning animator, producer and director best known for animated TV series including “TaleSpin” and animated films such as “The Nine Lives of Fritz the Cat,” died December 11 in Woodland Hills, Calif., of complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He was 70.

Born in Boston, Taylor began his career in animation in 1966 at Terrytoons in New York with Ralph Bakshi. He worked on Bakshi’s X-rated animated feature “Fritz the Cat,” and in 1974 directed sequel “The Nine Lives of Fritz the Cat,” which played in competition at Cannes. He also worked with Bakshi as an animator on “Heavy Traffic,” “Coonskin” and “Wizards.”

Taylor went on to direct the animated film “Heidi’s Song” in 1982 and animated TV series including Emmy award-winning “TaleSpin,” “Goof Troop,” “The Flintstone Kids,” and “Challenge of the GoBots.” Though he was uncredited, it was well known that Taylor was the co-director of Hanna-Barbera’s “Rock Odyssey,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Robert Taylor, Director of ‘Nine Lives of Fritz the Cat,’ Dies at 70

Robert Taylor, Director of  ‘Nine Lives of Fritz the Cat,’ Dies at 70
Robert “Bob” Taylor, an award-winning animator, producer and director best known for animated TV series including “TaleSpin” and animated films such as “The Nine Lives of Fritz the Cat,” died December 11 in Woodland Hills, Calif., of complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He was 70.

Born in Boston, Taylor began his career in animation in 1966 at Terrytoons in New York with Ralph Bakshi. He worked on Bakshi’s X-rated animated feature “Fritz the Cat,” and in 1974 directed sequel “The Nine Lives of Fritz the Cat,” which played in competition at Cannes. He also worked with Bakshi as an animator on “Heavy Traffic,” “Coonskin” and “Wizards.”

Taylor went on to direct the animated film “Heidi’s Song” in 1982 and animated TV series including Emmy award-winning “TaleSpin,” “Goof Troop,” “The Flintstone Kids,” and “Challenge of the GoBots.” Though he was uncredited, it was well known that Taylor was the co-director of Hanna-Barbera’s “Rock Odyssey,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Trailers from Hell Wears 'Coonskin'

Trailers from Hell Wears 'Coonskin'
Today on Trailers from Hell, Larry Karaszewski tackles Ralph Bakshi's controversial 1975 "Coonskin," an animated satire on race relations. Ralph Bakshi's nervy satire on race relations courted controversy from all sides, beginning with its in-your-face title (which Bakshi himself objected to) and its incendiary use of African-American stereotypes to score its satirical points. The 1975 film, a mix of live action and animation, referenced a wide range of black-cultural hot buttons including "Song of the South" and blaxploitation fare. The production of the movie was fractious enough (Bakshi was locked out of the studio at one point) but the actual release of the film was when the fireworks, including picketing and a few smoke bombs in select theater lobbies, really started. In the decades since, cooler heads have prevailed and Coonskin counts artists as disparate as Spike Lee and Quentin Tarantino among its fans.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Coonskin

Ralph Bakshi’s nervy satire on race relations courted controversy from all sides, beginning with its in-your-face title (which Bakshi himself objected to) and its incendiary use of African-American stereotypes to score its satirical points. The 1975 film, a mix of live action and animation, referenced a wide range of black-cultural hot buttons including Song of the South and blaxploitation fare. The production of the movie was fractious enough (Bakshi was locked out of the studio at one point) but the actual release of the film was when the fireworks, including picketing and a few smoke bombs in select theater lobbies, really started. In the decades since, cooler heads have prevailed and Coonskin counts artists as disparate as Spike Lee and Quentin Tarantino among its fans. Nsfw!

The post Coonskin appeared first on Trailers From Hell.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Still Bakshi after all these years: Iconoclastic 'Fritz the Cat' director has another tale to tell -- Exclusive Photo

Still Bakshi after all these years: Iconoclastic 'Fritz the Cat' director has another tale to tell -- Exclusive Photo
“Hey people, Ralphie needs money to draw. Let’s give him some so he can make a fool of himself again.” — Ralph Bakshi’s Miss America, in the Kickstarter campaign video for his new animated project

Making films has never been easy for Ralph Bakshi. The maverick cartoonist and filmmaker, who became famous — and infamous — after 1972′s smash X-rated ‘toon, Fritz the Cat, never liked to color within the lines, so to speak. He was the anti-Disney back then, filling his stories with provocative themes, raunchy humor, and curvacious broads that would make Russ Meyer blush. His bold 1975 blaxploitation satire
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

What's The Deal With Warners Bros 'Censored 11'?

Since many people took notice of my recent piece about Ralph Bakshi's animated film Coonskin (read Here) it prompted me to say at least a few (or a couple dozen) words about the infamous Warner Bros “Censored 11”. And just what precisely are the Warner Bros Censored 11? They are 11 Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoons made during the Golden Era of Warner Bros’ cartoons, from the early 30's to the mid 40's and have been deemed so racially offensive and insensitive, that they were pulled from distribution for fear of creating major controversy. But, as they always say, you just can’t keep a good controversy down. And, as...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Kickstart This! Ralph Bakshi's Last Days Of Coney Island

Ralph Bakshi - the iconic cult animator responsible for Fritz The Cat, Coonskin, Cool World, Fire And Ice and the animated Lord Of The Rings - is getting back in the saddle and he needs your help to - as he puts it - do something for animation that isn't motivated by making you happy or stupid.It's called Last Days Of Coney Island and he's looking for your financial support on Kickstarter.In my films I have always discussed America: who we are, what we are, for better and worse, and the ridiculous.  I'm here on Kickstarter asking for your support for my newest project, Last Days of Coney Island.It's a series of shorts set against the strange backdrop of Coney Island and all its weird...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Weekend Wrap-Up: Jessica Simpson Busts Out, General Hospital Wins Big at Daytime Emmys

Weekend Wrap-Up: Jessica Simpson Busts Out, General Hospital Wins Big at Daytime Emmys
Jessica Simpson wasn't the only celeb busting out on the scene this weekend. Hollywood's hottest daytime stars were also out and about in Tinseltown, coming out in droves Saturday night for the 39th annual Daytime Emmy Awards. But that wasn't all that was brewing in Hollywood. We've got the deets on Brave's box office smackdown and more on this weekend's celeb happenings, right here. • Bustin' Out: Jessica Simpson showed off some major post-baby cleavage as she pushed her daughter Maxwell around town Friday afternoon. • Daytime Emmys: General Hospital won big at the 39th annual Daytime Emmy Awards Saturday night, taking...
See full article at E! Online »

Review: Wizards

  • Comicmix
While guys like Steven Spielberg, Francis Ford Coppola and George Lucas spent the 1970s reinventing live action moviemaking, animation had just one lone figure toiling away. Ralph Bakshi, trained on Terrytoons and involved in 1960s television animation, began exploring the possibilities of animated features in the shadow of Walt Disney’s death. His Fritz the Cat made people sit up and take notice, followed by Heavy Traffic, and Coonskin – urban, funky, raw tales set in a familiar world.

After that, he set his sights on something fantastic and gave us, in 1976, Wizards. I’ve been waiting for this film to be restored, cleaned up, and released on Blu-ray given its visual artistry and fun story. Finally, 20th Century Home Entertainment has released it for the film’s 35th Anniversary and they’ve given it a handsome treatment. Encased in a hardcover case with a 24-page booklet, the Blu-ray is striking to watch.
See full article at Comicmix »

Here’s some more about Coonskin

Back in 1975, no film was more controversial and created such an intense furor than Ralph Bakshi’s animated adult film Coonskin. On a roll with his previously highly successful and very adult sex and profanity laced animated films Fritz The Cat and Heavy Traffic, Paramount signed him up, and he started working on a new film, originally titled Harlem Nights, for producer Al Ruddy, who at the time was one of the biggest producers in Hollywood, due to the success of Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather.

Coonskin was a mix of live action and animation, starring Barry White and Charles Gordone as two guys who rush to help out a friend, who’s just escaped from prison (Phillip Michael Thomas… remember him?), but are trapped by police in a shootout. While he’s waiting for his friends to get themselves out of their predicament, Thomas is told several stories
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Street Fight (aka Coonskin) Gets Official DVD Release!

“The art of cartooning is vulgarity. The only reason for cartooning to exist is to be on the edge. If you only take apart what they allow you to take apart, you’re Disney. Cartooning is a low-class, for-the-public art, just like graffiti art and rap music. Vulgar but believable, that’s the line I kept walking.” Ralph Bakshi.

And, finally, this November, you will be able to own a sample of Bakshi’s “vulgarity” when his masterpiece, Street Fight (aka Coonskin), will officially be released on crisp DVD, in widescreen. There was a previous unofficial DVD release of the film, which was actually more like somebody’s idea of a bad joke – a VHS transfer.

On its surface, Street Fight will probably, impulsively seem like nothing more than a set of racist, offensive ideas printed to film; however, taking the time to peel back its layers will prove to
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Free Flick of the Day: American Pop

Free Flick of the Day: American Pop
The early '80s were an interesting time for controversial artist and animator Ralph Bakshi. His 1970s were filled with incendiary offerings like Heavy Traffic, Coonskin, Wizards, Fritz the Cat, and his (truncated) adaptation of Lord of the Rings. But once the 1980s rolled around, Mr. Bakshi was a little more sedate -- and absolutely intent on furthering the art of feature-length animation. The often misunderstood Bakshi would turn out Hey Good Lookin' in 1982 and collaborate with the legendary Frank Frazetta on 1983's Fire and Ice ... but I say the filmmaker's best work was his follow-up to the Lord of the Rings misstep...

It's called American Pop and it strives to tell the story of American music over the course of four generations, from an immigrant who specializes in vaudeville to a modern-day rock star. (Well, modern for 1981.) Arguably Mr. Bakshi's most sincere film, American Pop often feels like the
See full article at Cinematical »

Poster Alert! Street Fight (aka Coon Skin)

Now finally here is something for you animation fans out there in terms of Alamo posters. Today the Alamo Ritz will be screening the controversial Ralph Bakshi classic Street Fight, better known under its original and far more racist title Coon Skin. This will kick off a month of Bakshi film screenings and today he will be present at the Street Fight event.

Artist Bobby Dixon returns to the soft subtle bosoms of the Alamo as a poster artist after a long sabbatical and brings us this fantastic looking and colorful piece. The thing is 24x36, signed and numbered by the artist and printed in 5 colors. Now there were only 50 copies made of this and as I write this there are only 28 left so if you are a Bakshi fan then this is something for you.
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

See also

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