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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 27 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Board of Governors Bias: Bacall, Garbo Among Rare Female Winners of Academy's Honorary Award

4 September 2014 2:58 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Honorary Oscars have bypassed women: Angela Lansbury, Lauren Bacall among rare exceptions (photo: 2013 Honorary Oscar winner Angela Lansbury and Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award winner Angelina Jolie) September 4, 2014, Introduction: This four-part article on the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Honorary Awards and the dearth of female Honorary Oscar winners was originally posted in February 2007. The article was updated in February 2012 and fully revised before its republication today. All outdated figures regarding the Honorary Oscars and the Academy's other Special Awards have been "scratched out," with the updated numbers and related information inserted below each affected paragraph or text section. See also "Honorary Oscars 2014 addendum" at the bottom of this post. At the 1936 Academy Awards ceremony, groundbreaking film pioneer D.W. Griffith, by then a veteran with more than 500 shorts and features to his credit — among them the epoch-making The Birth of a Nation and Intolerance — became the first individual to »

- Andre Soares

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See Reddit users’ favorite movie from each year

2 September 2014 12:56 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Throughout the summer, an admin on the r/movies subreddit has been leading Reddit users in a poll of the best movies from every year for the last 100 years called 100 Years of Yearly Cinema. The poll concluded three days ago, and the list of every movie from 1914 to 2013 has been published today.

Users were asked to nominate films from a given year and up-vote their favorite nominees. The full list includes the outright winner along with the first two runners-up from each year. The list is mostly a predictable assortment of IMDb favorites and certified classics, but a few surprise gems have also risen to the top of the crust, including the early experimental documentary Man With a Movie Camera in 1929, Abel Gance’s J’Accuse! in 1919, the Fred Astaire film Top Hat over Alfred Hitchcock’s The 39 Steps in 1935, and Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing over John Ford’s »

- Brian Welk

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Blu-ray Release: Under Fire

2 September 2014 7:04 AM, PDT | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

Blu-ray Release Date: Oct. 14, 2014

Price: Blu-ray $29.95

Studio: Twilight Time

Nick Nolte (ctr.) and Joanna Cassidy are Under Fire.

On the tail of their Blu-ray release of Oliver Stone’s Salvador comes a Twilight Time Blu-ray debut of that other photojournalist-in-Latin-America film of the early Eighties, 1983’s Under Fire, starring Nick Nolte (TV’s Rich Man Poor Man), Joanna Cassidy (Blade Runner) and Gene Hackman (The Conversation).

Set during the last days of the Nicaraguan revolution that ended the Somoza regime in Nicaragua in 1979, the film revolves around three journalists involved in a romantic triangle as they cover the political intrigue that led up to that year’s revolution.

Directed by Roger Spottiswoode (Tomorrow Never Dies) from a screenplay by Clayton Frohman, Under Fire makes its Blu-ray debut with this release from Twilight Time.

As supplier Twilight Time prints up only 3,000 copies of each title, the time to order your Blu-ray »

- Laurence

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This Is the End: James Gray on 'Apocalypse Now'

11 August 2014 10:26 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

August is upon us, which invariably means withering heat and a hell of a lot of bad cinema. Worn out by the time the dog days hit, the studios enter hibernation mode, concerned mostly with counting their early summer blockbuster returns (or licking their wounds). There's hope around the corner — the fall festivals loom — but that moment isn't here yet. The last month of summer is usually barren.

Except when it isn't.

Related: Remembering Marlon Brando, by Jack Nicholson

It certainly wasn't 35 years ago — August 15, 1979, to be exact, when Francis Ford Coppola »

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The Story of Hollywood in Just 10 Filmsc

5 August 2014 9:57 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Over at The Telegraph, Robbie Collin has chosen to take on the impossible, he's set out to create a list of films that tells the story of Hollywood "in terms of how one picture or director led to the next." It's a daunting task that creates an interesting narrative and he prefaces his ten selections saying: ...none of the individual works is "great" or "important" enough to drown out the others. I've avoided films such as Citizen Kane, Vertigo, Singin' in the Rain, Casablanca, Gone with the Wind, Lawrence of Arabia and The Godfather, not just because we already know they're great, but because their greatness might throw the story off-balance - although I wouldn't hesitate to describe any of the films that are on this list as a masterpiece. So how does his list shape outc Have a look: One Week (1920) - dir. Buster Keaton It Happened One Night (1934) - dir. »

- Brad Brevet

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Watch Brian Cox's Playlist on Sky Movies

23 July 2014 2:09 AM, PDT | Sky Movies | See recent Sky Movies news »

As the family winner Believe arrives on Sky Movies at the same time as cinemas, leading man and acting legend Brian Cox presents a selection of his favourite movies on demand. While enjoying his performance as the great football manager Matt Busby in Believe, you can also share many of the classics that adorn the shelves of his own library. In this introduction to his playlist, Brian shows his appreciation of All About Eve, bows down to Gene Hackman in The Conversation, and give a salute to Peter O'Toole. »

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Ten Conspiracy Thrillers with Cynical Resolutions

17 July 2014 8:26 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Though there are some spoilers sprinkled throughout this piece for some of the films, they are largely vague for readers who have not seen the films in question.

In his book Nixonland: The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of America, journalist Rick Pearlstein posits that Nixon, one of history’s most reviled presidents, manipulated social trends, tense racial crises and even war to assume the office, and, perhaps inadvertently, created the way the Right and Left deal with each other in the present day. The scars of the seventies indeed still hang like a dark cloud over Washington, its internal systems ravaged by covert bugging operations and illegal payoffs. With Edward Snowden’s Nsa revelations and Wikileaks at the forefront today, America has once again regressed into paranoia, though nothing in contemporary cinema compares to the violent, bleak reactions filmmakers had to the Watergate scandal. The occasional modern conspiracy thriller, »

- Kenny Hedges

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Watch Brian Cox's Playlist on Sky Movies

17 July 2014 5:10 AM, PDT | Sky Movies | See recent Sky Movies news »

As the family winner Believe arrives on Sky Movies at the same time as cinemas, leading man and acting legend Brian Cox presents a selection of his favourite movies on demand. While enjoying his performance as the great football manager Matt Busby in Believe, you can also share many of the classics that adorn the shelves of his own library. In this introduction to his playlist, Brian shows his appreciation of All About Eve, bows down to Gene Hackman in The Conversation, and give a salute to Peter O'Toole. »

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The Forgotten Auteur: Bob Fosse

7 July 2014 11:25 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

 

Most people today would likely be shocked to think that in 1972, The Godfather went into the Oscars anything but a sure bet for Best Picture. Aside from Casablanca and Citizen Kane it is recognized as the greatest American film of all time and in hind sight most people forget that not only was it tied for nominations in 1972, but Coppola lost Best Director.

Because hindsight is anything but 20/20 when popular consensus takes over, the narrative of the Hollywood Renaissance is one of Scorsese, Spielberg and Lucas getting snubbed for Taxi Driver, Jaws, Close Encounters, and Star Wars. But looking at the 1970s and the race for Best Director, what you see instead is two directors fighting it out for director of the decade, each earning three nominations.

Obviously one of them is Francis Ford Coppola. With both Godfathers, The Conversation, and, Apocalypse Now most people would say that he won that fight. »

- Mynt Marsellus

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Karl Schanzer, Who Inspired Coppola’s 'The Conversation,' Dies at 81

2 June 2014 9:59 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Karl Schanzer, a longtime story analyst whose real-life experience as a private eye was an inspiration for Francis Ford Coppola’s The Conversation, died May 25 in Studio City. He was 81. Schanzer worked as a reader for Jeffrey Katzenberg at Paramount (where he found what would become the 1982 Eddie Murphy hit 48 HRs.) and as a creative executive at 20th Century Fox, among many studio positions. He also produced and created the story for Camouflage (2001), co-written by Billy Bob Thornton under the pseudonym Reginald Perry. (Thornton’s character in Sling Blade is named after Schanzer.) Born in Hartford, Conn., on Nov. 25, 1932, Schanzer

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- Stephen Galloway

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Top Ten Cannes Film Festival Palme d'Or Winners

12 May 2014 10:25 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Palais des Festivals at the 2013 Cannes Film FestivalPhoto: RopeofSilicon.com The 2014 Cannes Film Festival begins in just two days and since I won't be able to attend this year I still wanted to do something Cannes-related. I started looking back over the years of the festival, which is celebrating its 67th edition this year. I considered going back and reviewing 15-16 films from a specific year in the past, but I thought of it too late. I then started looking over the history of past winners, and while I realize I haven't seen even half of the Cannes Film Festival winners I thought it would be fun to take a look at a list of the top ten I had seen, assuming readers could add their thoughts in the comments, suggesting some titles I have not yet seen or those you believe belong in the top ten. As we all know, »

- Brad Brevet

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10 Directors Who Somehow Made 3 (Or More) Masterpieces In A Row

7 May 2014 2:21 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

As good as some directors are, it’s really difficult to maintain a level of quality over the course of several films. Even the best directors seem to have one or two stinkers in between their classics. For example, during the six year span from 1993 to 1998, Steven Spielberg made Jurassic Park, Schindler’s List, Amistad, Saving Private Ryan… and then The Lost World: Jurassic Park is right there in the middle, to muck it all up. Yes, the culprit often involves a director making a sequel to one of their previous films, which inevitably brings down their entire filmography.

But sometimes the stars align and directors get on a really good streak, churning out masterpiece upon masterpiece. It’s impressive enough for filmmakers to have five amazing movies to their name over the span of a twenty year career, but it’s another thing entirely when you come across one »

- Audrey Fox

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‘Blow Out’ and ‘Blowup’: examining two masterpieces

6 May 2014 12:05 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Please note that the following piece contains spoilers for the final act of Blow Out.

Taken at face value Blow Out, Brian De Palma’s 1981 film, is a nifty and tightly wound little thriller. It starts to run into some trouble, however, when compared to Michelangelo Antonioni’s seminal counter culture classic Blowup (1966), the film that most inspired it; there is arguably more artistic impact to Antonioni’s film. It helps when the viewer realizes that Blow Out isn’t a full-on remake, and it would be wrong to describe it as such; rather, it is an alternative interpretation of Blowup‘s major concerns. Both films have their merits and both films have become classics in their own right.

Blowup is the story of a frivolous fashion photographer (David Hemmings) in 1960s London, who believes he may have unwittingly photographed a murder while taking pictures of lovers in a park. »

- Tressa

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22 immediate reactions to the 'Star Wars' casting announcement

29 April 2014 12:32 PM, PDT | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

An era ended on the afternoon of Tuesday, April 29. For eighteen beautiful months, the people of Earth were allowed to speculate wildly, recklessly, and ridiculously about the actors and actresses who would populate Star Wars: Episode VII, the much-anticipated reboot of our culture’s lost innocence the Star Wars movie franchise. Benedict Cumberbatch as Grand Admiral Thrawn! Jennifer Lawrence as a young Jedi Knight! Michael B. Jordan as Brando Calrissian, the bounty hunter son of Lando! But those days are over now. The cast has been finalized. They’re sitting together, wearing comfortable jeans on comfortable couches. What are we, »

- Darren Franich

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DVD Release: March or Die

17 April 2014 1:37 PM, PDT | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

DVD Release Date: June 17, 2014

Price: DVD $19.95

Studio: Hen’s Tooth

Gene Hackman is a Major in the French Foreign Legion in March or Die.

In the tradition of Beau Gest, the 1977 action-adventure film March or Die stars Gene Hackman (The Conversation) and Ian Holm (Brazil).

It’s 1918 and a war-weary American Major (Hackman) in the French Foreign Legion, with a ragtag squadron of young legionnaires, is assigned to a remote Moroccan outpost. Their mission is to secure a French government archaeological dig that is looting an ancient tomb of its Arab treasure. The troops’ presence is not at all welcome by the Arab chieftain El Krim (Holm), who vows to expel the French intruders at any cost. But the French steadfastly refuse to leave. After a series of skirmishes, the film concludes with an epic battle between the two forces.

Directed by Dick Richards, produced by a young Jerry Bruckheimer, »

- Laurence

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Required Reading: Nsa Movies and a New Piracy Lawsuit

8 April 2014 7:00 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

The best movie culture writing from around the internet-o-sphere. There will be a quiz later. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya? “Why The Conversation Should Be Required Viewing At The Nsa” — Alexander Huls at The Atlantic intelligently stretches an article that could have read “Because Gene Hackman rules.” into a potent exploration of the resonant Francis Ford Coppola spy film. “The Hotel Manager from The Shining Was the First Actor to Play James Bond” — Alison Nastasi at Movies.com briefly shares some cross-over movie trivia. “Five movies that adapt classic literature in unusual ways” — Noel Murray at The Dissolve lists a decently broad array of older stories coming back in new clothing. It turns out that cribbing from Shakespeare might be the best way to make a high school movie bearable. “10 Things in the Cinematic Marvel Universe That Make No Damn Sense” — Rob Bricken at io9 recognizes the head-slappingly dumb things that found their »

- Scott Beggs

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One From the Heart to Francis Ford Coppola

7 April 2014 4:00 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Glenn here. As Jason already established, today is Francis Ford Coppola's 75th birthday today. Talia's brother, Sofia and Roman's dad, Nicolas and Jason's uncle, and Gia's grandfather presides over a clearly very talented family that keep kicking artistic goals. We're only four months into this new year and Sofia has (apparently) been hired for her first big studio film, Jason Schwartzman has appeared on screen in indie box office hit The Grand Budapest Hotel, and Gia's directorial debut, Palo Alto, is about to hit cinema screens. What's Frances up to? Well the five-time Oscar winner is laying low it seems after none of his ultra-arty projects - Twixt, Youth Without Youth, Tetro - took off the way he likely expected his artistic return to.

It's then a perfect opportunity to dig a bit deeper into his extensive filmography and find something you've never seen. I know »

- Glenn Dunks

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Happy Birthday Francis Ford Coppola! Watch Full 'Inside The Actor's Studio' Episode With Legendary Director

7 April 2014 8:22 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Across the 1970s, legendary director Francis Ford Coppola completed the kind of run that even today, filmmakers could only dream of matching in terms of scope, ambition and accomplishment. From 1972 to 1979, a seemingly non-stop Coppola delivered "The Godfather," "The Conversation," "The Godfather Part II," and "Apocalypse Now," with each of the films making a distinct mark on cinematic history. And while he could've easily folded up the director's chair after that, Coppola kept pushing himself. And that's part of the reason why the filmmaker is as revered as he is today, with his undeniable skill and desire to continually find new creative avenues, a source of inspiration, even if the results didn't always match his top shelf work (a peak that would be hard for anyone to hit). And to celebrate the director's 75th birthday today, below is his appearance on "Inside The  Actor's Studio" in 2001. As per usual with James Lipton's show, »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Star Wars cast: Ford, Fisher, Hamill before they were famous

14 March 2014 8:05 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

When news broke earlier this week that five young up-and-coming actors were in line for the lead Jedi role in Star Wars Episode VII, Google search bars will likely have been working overtime as film fans tried to match faces to names.

Ed Speleers, John Boyega, Jesse Plemons, Matthew James Thomas and Ray Fisher may not be household names, but Star Wars has a history of turning unknowns into big stars.

With the casting cogs turning for Star Wars: Episode VII, we take a look at what Harrison Ford, Mark Hamill and Carrie Fisher were up to before they met George Lucas.

Harrison Ford

Now a bona fide movie icon, it's common knowledge that Ford struggled early on in his career and starting working as a carpenter to support his family between acting gigs. Sometimes Ford didn't even get an acting credit at all, and on one occasion he was »

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“Walter Murch: From The Godfather to the God Particle”

23 February 2014 10:11 AM, PST | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Legendary film editor, sound designer, writer, translator, amateur astronomer and director Walter Murch needs no introduction. (Oh, what the hell, his credits include The Conversation, Apocalypse Now, The Talented Mr. Ripley, Tetro and more.) In addition to being a great filmmaker, he’s also a great teacher and talker about film. Here, at the 2013 Sheffield Doc Fest, where he accompanied the doc, Particle Fever, he gives an inspiring speech on film editing, technology, audience expectation, how film grammar is changing with digital technologies, and physics. Don’t miss this. »

- Scott Macaulay

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 27 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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