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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 42 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »

200 Greatest Horror Films (170-161)

8 October 2015 8:33 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Special Mention: Shock Corridor

Written and directed by Samuel Fuller

USA, 1963

Genre: Psychological Thriller

Shock Corridor stars Peter Breck as Johnny Barrett, an ambitious reporter who wants to expose a killer hiding out at the local insane asylum. In order to solve the case, he must pretend to be insane so they have him committed. Once in the asylum, Barrett sets to work, interrogating the other patients and keeping a close eye on the staff. But it’s difficult to remain a sane man living in an insane place, and the closer Barrett gets to the truth, the closer he gets to insanity.

Shock Corridor is best described as an anti-establishment drama that at times is surprisingly quite funny despite the dark material. The film deals with some timely issues of the era, specifically the atom bomb, anti-communism, and racism. It features everything from a raving female love-crazed nympho ward, »

- Ricky Fernandes

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Francis Ford Coppola Doesn’t Want to Make “Factory Movies”

7 October 2015 11:00 AM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Francis Ford Coppola makes a lot more wine than he does movies nowadays. We haven’t seen a film from the iconic director behind The GodfatherApocalypse Now, and The Conversation for four years now. His last picture, Twixt, came and went. Over the past decade Coppola has been directing some of his most experimental work, not what he calls “factory movies,” which […]

The post Francis Ford Coppola Doesn’t Want to Make “Factory Movies” appeared first on /Film. »

- Jack Giroux

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Review: "I Knew It Was You: Rediscovering John Cazale" (2009); A Film By Richard Shepard

3 October 2015 8:26 PM, PDT | | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Lee Pfeiffer

It's rare that a feature included as a bonus in a Blu-ray release of a classic movie would rate having us provide a separate review. However, director Richard Shepard's acclaimed documentary "I Knew It Was You: Rediscovering John Cazle" merits exceptional treatment. The 2009 movie gained considerable praise when first released but suffered the fate of most documentaries in that it was not widely seen outside of the art house circuit and a DVD release the following year. Fortunately, Warner Home Video had the good instincts to include it in their 40th anniversary Blu-ray release of "Dog Day Afternoon" (click here for review) , a film in which Cazale stole the show despite sharing the screen with some of the most talented actors on the planet.  The documentary packs a great deal into it's all-too-brief 40 minute running time and sheds much light on the career of Cazale, perhaps »

- (Cinema Retro)

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Watch: 13-Minute Video Essay Peels Back The Layers Of Francis Ford Coppola's 'The Conversation'

2 October 2015 12:14 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Francis Ford Coppola is, quite possibly, the director of some of cinema’s finest moments, with the three ‘Godfather’ films and “Apocalypse Now.” And, while the magnitude of these works ought to never be overlooked, the fact of the matter is that some of his other (and in one case, in this writer’s opinion, better) films often end up buried in the periphery of the praise that has slowly amassed over the decades. Said better film? The 1974 Gene Hackman espionage thriller “The Conversation.” Wedged right in there between “The Godfather” and “The Godfather Part II,” the flick was undervalued — but surely never forgotten — for quite some time, but has seen a resurgence in recent years (thank you Netflix). Now, a new video essay from the folks over at The Discarded Image has taken on the rather incredible opening sequence for their newest installment. Read More: Retrospective: The Films of Francis Ford CoppolaThe Conversation, »

- Gary Garrison

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This Daft Punk'ed Shia LeBeouf "Do it" Video Is Amazing, a Little Late

25 September 2015 1:20 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Nothing was a more American celebration of armistice and peace on Memorial Day weekend 2015 than Shia LeBeouf's intentionally open-source James Franco-esque feaux art (f'art for those of you keeping score) motivational speech-y green screen "Do It!" performance. With videos like MillerWa4's 'Damn It, Shia' we thought we'd seen the best of them. So, we had a good laugh and filed that one under "Never Think About Again." But, perhaps the overwhelming sense of helpless longterm compulsion a la Gene Hackman's turn as Harry Caul in Coppola's Godfather follow-up The Conversation makes Ilka Da's 'Daft LeBeouf' take the cake. The video's description alone is a haunting tale which grows a new pair of legs every time I think about it. We really do hope you're in a healthy state, Ilka. See tortured brilliance below:   »

- Dick Schulz

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Beyond Fright review: Dog Day Afternoon (40th Anniversary Bluray)

20 September 2015 4:42 PM, PDT | | See recent Icons of Fright news »

I’m a massive fan of heist films. There’s just something so entertaining and gripping as sitting down and watching films like Heat, Reservoir Dogs, or in this case, Dog Day Afternoon. Easily one of my favorite subgenres of film, films like the ones mentioned above were all able to not only tell a very tightly wound tale, but offered their viewers characters that leaped off of the screen Every Single Time you revisited them. Sidney Lumet’s 1975 classic Dog Day Afternoon gave its viewers a wild ride of a film, and one that offered its audience something entirely different, from its ability to sympathize with its antagonists all the way to its true story of a man robbing a bank to pay for his lover’s sex change. It’s a completely unique and lasting film, and not only does Warner Bros.’ new 40th Anniversary Bluray give fans »

- Jerry Smith

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Francis Ford Coppola to Get Pen Center Lifetime Achievement Award

10 September 2015 1:34 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Screenwriters and filmmakers are among those set to receive Pen Center USA honors on November 16, 2015, in Beverly Hills. Francis Ford Coppola will accept the organization’s 2015 Lifetime Achievement Award. The inimitable Coppola's body of work spans over five decades as a director, producer and screenwriter. He's one of few filmmakers to win two Palme d'Ors, for "The Conversation" and "Apocalypse Now," and he's won Academy Awards for films including "Patton" and "The Godfather" series. Meghan Daum, Claudia Rankine, Noah Hawley and screenwriter Graham Moore (Oscar winner for "The Imitation Game") are among winners of the Pen Center's 2015 Literary Awards, who will receive $1,000. Read More: Watch: Francis Ford Coppola on the Future of Cinema, Marlon Brando and Regrets The 2015 award winners include: Meghan Daum (Creative Nonfiction Award for "The Unspeakable"); Victor Lodato (Drama Award for "Arlington"); Robert »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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Watch: “A Conversation. With Walter Murch”

17 August 2015 10:54 AM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

This year, the legendary Walter Murch received a “Vision Award — Nescens” from the just-completed Locarno Film Festival, and this neat short film was presumably made to accompany the presentation. Director Niccolò Castelli places Murch in a warehouse very much like Harry Caul’s setup in The Conversation. Murch plays with previously recorded analogue tape of him talking about how we’re introduced to the concept of music while in the womb, then talks about the process and history of the manipulations he just executed on the Revox. It’s a typical combination of Murch’s trademark bigger-picture thinking and acute technical knowledge. »

- Vadim Rizov

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The Perils of Passion Projects

11 August 2015 4:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Christopher Nolan recently announced a new project entitled Quay, a documentary short about two British stop-motion animators. Set to premiere next week, it’s a far cry from Nolan’s blockbusters in both scope and subject matter. Yet it’s clearly a personal project, with Nolan using his clout and money to promote two obscure filmmakers.

Every artist – director, star, screenwriter – has some project that they want to make above all. A deeply personal, original idea; an autobiographical story; a favored story or hero they wish to celebrate. If a filmmaker is successful or lucky enough, they get a chance to produce them. Yet sometimes the reaction isn’t what they expect.

Francis Ford Coppola started his career directing exploitation films for Roger Corman, notably the horror film Dementia 13 (1963). Then he toiled as screenwriter and occasional director, helming the musical Finian’s Rainbow (1968) and the more personal The Rain People »

- Christopher Saunders

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Reflections of Evil: Steven Spielberg’s paranoia and conspiracy theories

7 August 2015 3:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

There are few real-life figures more beloved in American cinema than Steven Spielberg. He’s earned that adoration without question, but his worship retards the dialogue around his work. Like his buddy Colonel G. Lucas, Spielberg is a brand first, a businessman second, and a filmmaker last.

It’s time to loosen up the conversation. Spielberg is less an auteur and more Hollywood’s greatest journeyman, a master craftsman whose natural talent allows him to tackle almost any material. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t common themes that run throughout his work. A lot of breath has been devoted to his sense of wonder and awe, his parent’s divorce, his love of children. But there’s a darker current to his work, one that appears less subtly in thrillers like The Conversation, Three Days of the Condor, and other conspiracy films of the New Hollywood era. It’s a sense of paranoia, »

- Nathan Smith

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BBC Culture curates 100 best American films, courtesy of 62 international film critics

22 July 2015 5:01 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

BBC Culture has this week unveiled a new list of the top 100 American films, as voted for by a pool of international film critics from across the globe. The format of the poll was that any film that would make the list had to have recieved funding from a Us source, and the directors of the films did not need to be from the USA, nor did the films voted for need to be filmed in the Us.

Critics were asked to submit their top 10 lists, which would try to find the top 100 American films that while “not necessarily the most important, but the greatest on an emotional level”. The list, as you may have guessed, is very different to the lists curated by say the BFI or AFI over the years, so there are certainly a few surprises on here, with Steve McQueen’s 12 Years A Slave (2013), Terrence Malick »

- Scott J. Davis

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Scratching our heads at the BBC's top 100 American Movies of All-Time

21 July 2015 5:07 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

First off, let's make one thing clear.  We're not scratching our heads at Spike Lee's "Do The Right Thing" making the BBC's 100 greatest American films.  That movie, of which an image accompanies this post, not only made the list, but ranked appropriately at no. 25.  It's the rest of the selections that have us scratching and, yes, shaking our heads in disbelief. A wonderful page view driver, these sorts of lists make great fodder for passionate movie fans no matter what their age or part of the world they hail from.  There is nothing more entertaining than watching two critics from opposite ends of the globe try to debate whether "The Dark Knight" should have been nominated for best picture or make a list like this.  Even in this age of short form content where Vines, Shapchats and Instagram videos have captured viewers attention, movies will continue to inspire because »

- Gregory Ellwood

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'Citizen Kane' Tops BBC's List of "100 Greatest American Films", Where Does Your Favorite Landc

21 July 2015 11:46 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Leave it to the Brits to compile a list of the best American films of all-time. BBC Culture has published a list of what it calls "The 100 Greatest American Films", as selected by 62 international film critics in order to "get a global perspective on American film." As BBC Culture notes, the critics polled represent a combination of broadcasters, book authors and reviewers at various newspapers and magazines across the world. As for what makes an American filmc "Any movie that received funding from a U.S. source," BBC Culture's publication states, which is to say the terminology was quite loose, but the list contains a majority of the staples you'd expect to see. Citizen Kane -- what elsec -- comes in at #1, and in typical fashion The Godfather follows at #2. Vertigo, which in 2012 topped Sight & Sound's list of the greatest films of all-time, comes in at #3 on BBC Culture's list. »

- Jordan Benesh

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BBC Names 100 Greatest U.S. Films

21 July 2015 9:56 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Every now and then a major publication or news organisation comes up with a top fifty or one hundred films of all time list - a list which always stirs up debate, discussion and often interesting arguments about the justifications of the list's inclusions, ordering and notable exclusions.

Today it's the turn of BBC Culture who consulted sixty-two international film critics including print reviews, bloggers, broadcasters and film academics to come up with what they consider the one-hundred greatest American films of all time. To qualify, the film had to be made by a U.S. studio or mostly funded by American money.

Usually when a list of this type is done it is by institutes or publications within the United States asking American critics their favourites. This time it's non-American critics born outside the culture what they think are the best representations of that culture. Specifically they were asked »

- Garth Franklin

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Steven Soderbergh Picks 11 Favorite Films

1 July 2015 1:41 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

This vintage list dates back to 1989, when Steven Soderbergh was hot off his debut indie sensation "Sex, Lies and Videotape," which managed the rare feat of scoring the Palme d'Or after already premiering (and winning) at Sundance. Then in his mid-20s, Soderbergh was already well-read in the American classics. And now, after dozens of features and TV's "The Knick" and all but directing this weekend's "Magic Mike" sequel, he ranks with most of the names you see below. (Hat tip: The Film Stage.) Read More: Why "Magic Mike Xxl" Is Still a Soderbergh Movie "All the President's Men" (Alan J. Pakula, 1976) "Annie Hall" (Woody Allen, 1977) "Citizen Kane" (Orson Welles, 1941) "The Conversation" (Francis Ford Coppola, 1974) "The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T" (Roy Rowland, 1953) "The Godfather" (Francis Ford Coppola, 1972) "The Godfather: Part II" (Francis Ford Coppola, »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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25 Years In La Part 1: Gene Hackman, Eazy-e, and Albert Brooks defending a film

8 June 2015 6:30 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

When I left Tampa, it was the crack of dawn. I was in the passenger's seat of the Chevette that Scott Swan owned, and we were on our way to California to be rich and famous. I was 20 years old. I thought I had all the answers. I had a screenplay called "The President Must Die!" with me that I was sure was going to be produced by the following summer with an all-star cast. We had all of them picked. Harrison Ford, Robert DeNiro, Robin Williams. Scott and I had spent the entire spring writing it, and we were done. Absolutely, completely, positively done. It was perfect. It was going to be a huge hit. This was the logical next step. This wasn't our first script, either. We had written a script together called "Moondance" during my first year of college, and a script called "A Weekend Away" during my second year of college. »

- Drew McWeeny

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Second Opinion – Tomorrowland (2015)

24 May 2015 1:37 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Tomorrowland, 2015.

Directed by Brad Bird.

Starring George Clooney, Britt RobertsonThomas RobinsonRaffey Cassidy and Hugh Laurie.


Bound by a shared destiny, a teen bursting with scientific curiosity and a former boy-genius inventor embark on a mission to unearth the secrets of a place somewhere in time and space that exists in their collective memory.

The world’s ending, it’s all our fault and Disney want you to know about it, but first let’s have a fun time at the cinema, buy the merchandise and check out the theme park before the cities crumble. It’s this hypocrisy which pulls director Brad Bird’s Tomorrowland in one direction only to push it into another; resulting in a film which, whilst being fun at times, never feels anywhere as genuine as it needs to be.

I appreciate and welcome a massive budget family movie which isn’t based »

- Gary Collinson

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The 5 Best Films of Francis Ford Coppola

21 May 2015 2:33 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor's Note: Indiewire has partnered with the El Rey Network in support of the iTunes release of their original show Director’s Chair. Top directors tackle insightful questions only other directors would think to ask. Find out more here.] Read More: The 5 Best Films of Quentin Tarantino Francis Ford Coppola's 1970s classics still hold a contemporary feel and artistic vitality, four decades later. From the consummate tale of family and power in "The Godfather" to the ever-prescient political thriller "The Conversation," his best works are definitive genre exercises, blending unwavering realism with escalating tension and a potent moral consideration.  Though his directorial stamp is unmistakable, Coppola has under his belt among the most celebrated family, political, crime and war films in the American canon. He has twice won the Academy Award for Best Picture and Best Director, and is one of only eight filmmakers to win the Cannes Film »

- David Canfield

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Le Conversazioni 2015 by Anne-Katrin Titze

10 May 2015 1:00 PM, PDT | | See recent news »

Stephen Sondheim and Joyce Carol Oates in conversation before Antonio Monda's Le Conversazioni Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Following his fall 2014 Le Conversazioni with Zadie Smith (White Teeth) and Patrick McGrath (Asylum and Spider), Antonio Monda invited Joyce Carol Oates and Stephen Sondheim to discuss films that influenced their lives and work.

Henry Hathaway's Niagara, Francis Ford Coppola's The Conversation, Martin Scorsese's Raging Bull and Elia Kazan's On The Waterfront were chosen by Joyce Carol Oates.

George Stevens' The More The Merrier, Mike van Diem's Character (Karakter), Krzysztof Zanussi's The Contract and Alfred Hitchcock's Shadow Of A Doubt were picked by Stephen Sondheim.

Le Conversazioni and Rome Film Festival Artistic Director Antonio Monda Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Marilyn Monroe, Dustin Hoffman, Katharine Hepburn, Jean Arthur, Walk Don't Run with Cary Grant, Privacy, Gene Hackman, West Side Story, Vertigo, The Rules Of The Game, Marlon Brando, »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Why 1974 was the best year in film history

29 April 2015 11:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century.  Click here for a complete list of our essays. I was one of the first to select years for this particular exercise, which probably allowed me to select the correct year. The answer is, of course, 1974 and all other answers are wrong. No matter what your criteria happens to be, 1974 is going to come out on top. Again, this is not ambiguous or open to debate. We have to start, of course, with the best of the best. "Chinatown" is one of the greatest movies ever made. You can't structure a thriller better than Robert Towne and Roman Polanski do, nor shoot a Los Angeles movie better than John Alonzo has done. Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway give the best performances of their careers, which is no small achievement. If you ask »

- Daniel Fienberg

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 42 items from 2015   « Prev | Next », Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

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