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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

18 items from 2015


The Conversation: Drew Morton and Landon Palmer discuss ‘Blow-Up’

19 March 2015 7:12 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Conversation is a new feature at Sound on Sight bringing together Drew Morton and Landon Palmer in a passionate debate about cinema new and old. For their third piece, they will discuss Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow Up.

****

Landon’s Take:

The cultural impact of Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow Up would be very difficult to overemphasize. Upon release, Andrew Sarris referred to the film as “a mod masterpiece” and ‘Playboy’ critic Arthur Knight went so far as comparing the film to Hiroshima mon amour, Rome Open City, and Citizen Kane in its potential influence on filmmaking. The film was also a massive hit worldwide and the tenth highest grossing film in the United States in 1966 – a memento of a brief window in time in which an art film by an Italian auteur could also do boffo box office. And, having been denied a seal by the Production Code Administration, Blow Up »

- Drew Morton

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Star Wars Actor Ford Injured in Plane Accident in Los Angeles Area

5 March 2015 4:43 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Harrison Ford injured in plane accident (image: Harrison Ford as Colonel Graff in 'Ender's Game') Star Wars and Raiders of the Lost Ark actor Harrison Ford was supposed to be in critical condition – later reports have upgraded that to "fair" or "stable" condition – following an accident with a small airplane on Los Angeles' Westside. Earlier this afternoon (March 5, 2015), a vintage, one-engine two-seater crash landed at the Penmar Golf Course, located in the Los Angeles suburb of Venice, not far from the Pacific Ocean and just west of Santa Monica Airport. Its pilot, 72-year-old Harrison Ford, was found "seriously" injured. He was alone on the plane. There were no injuries on the ground. As explained in the Los Angeles Times, "fire officials would not identify the victim of the crash but said he was conscious and breathing when paramedics arrived." Ford was later transported to an unidentified hospital. Eleven »

- Zac Gille

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Costume Designers Guild Awards: “Birdman,” “Grand Budapest,” “Into the Woods” Top Films

17 February 2015 10:13 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Updated 11:34 p.m. The Costume Designers Guild Awards may come too late to influence the Oscars race, but they managed to confirm what already seems to be clear: “Birdman” is the film to beat.

Albert Wolsky won the contemporary film category for Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu’s backstage tale, while legends Colleen Atwood and Milena Canonero took prizes for “Into the Woods” (fantasy film) and “The Grand Budapest Hotel” (period film).

Birdman” has a broad swath of awards support from numerous guilds, but “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is hot on its heels among design orgs.

In the TV categories, oft-honored “American Horror Story: Freak Show” took honors for made-for/miniseries. “True Detective” was honored as top contemporary TV series, and Michele Clapton won for “Game of Thrones” in the period/fantasy TV series category.

Colleen Atwood, winner for “Into the Woods” in the fantasy film category, recounted a fitting »

- David S. Cohen

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Costume Designers Guild Awards: “Birdman,” “Grand Budapest,” “Into the Woods” Top Films

17 February 2015 10:13 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Updated 11:34 p.m. The Costume Designers Guild Awards may come too late to influence the Oscars race, but they managed to confirm what already seems to be clear: “Birdman” is the film to beat.

Albert Wolsky won the contemporary film category for Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu’s backstage tale, while legends Colleen Atwood and Milena Canonero took prizes for “Into the Woods” (fantasy film) and “The Grand Budapest Hotel” (period film).

Birdman” has a broad swath of awards support from numerous guilds, but “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is hot on its heels among design orgs.

In the TV categories, oft-honored “American Horror Story: Freak Show” took honors for made-for/miniseries. “True Detective” was honored as top contemporary TV series, and Michele Clapton won for “Game of Thrones” in the period/fantasy TV series category.

Colleen Atwood, winner for “Into the Woods” in the fantasy film category, recounted a fitting »

- David S. Cohen

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Exclusive: Watch Francis Ford Coppola Talk to Robert Rodriguez About "The Things They Fire You For"

17 February 2015 7:37 PM, PST | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

Even if the only movies that Francis Ford Coppola ever made were the three Godfather films, he'd still be a cinematic legend. But he didn't just stop there: The Conversation, The Outsiders, Rumble Fish, Dracula, Apocalypse Now. The list goes on and on. He is, simply put, one of the Greats. That's why Coppola is such a welcome choice for The Director's Chair, a fantastic ongoing series on El Rey Network where Robert Rodriguez chats candidly with filmmakers about the entirety of their careers. In the past he's hosted Guillermo del Toro, Quentin Tarantino and John Carpenter, and they've all resulted in very worthwhile conversations about the realities of being a working artist in Hollywood. Speaking of that, we've got a clip from the upcoming The...

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- Peter Hall

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From Kubrick to Marilyn Monroe, Oscar Has a Stellar List of Shut-Outs

13 February 2015 4:54 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

There are 195 individuals nominated for Oscar this year. And when the winners are named Feb. 22, they will become part of film history, joining such greats as Billy Wilder, Ingrid Bergman, Ben Hecht and Walt Disney.

But 80% of the contenders will go home empty-handed. However, there is good news: They are in good company as well.

Here is a sampling of nominees that didn’t win: “Citizen Kane,” “Chinatown” and “Star Wars”; directors Alfred Hitchcock, Howard Hawks, Stanley Kubrick and Ingmar Bergman; writers Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, Dashiell Hammett, John Steinbeck, Graham Greene, Harold Pinter and David Mamet; actors Gloria Swanson in “Sunset Blvd.”; Audrey Hepburn in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”; and Peter O’Toole in “Lawrence of Arabia.”

They managed to do Ok, though.

It’s hard to say why they didn’t win. Sometimes tastes change. Sometimes there’s too much competition in one year. Frank Capra’s 1939 “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington »

- Tim Gray

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Missing Out on Berlin? Stream Award-Winning Shorts from the Archives

5 February 2015 12:52 PM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

As the Berlin International Film Festival gets underway abroad this week, you might be feeling a little left out of the buzz. Worry not, because streaming curator Mubi has made Berlinale shorts available to a global audience for the first time. In spirit of the 60th anniversary of Berlin's Golden Bear for shorts, a curated selection of the fest's winning films is now streaming on the site. Highlights include last year's "As Long as Shotguns Remain," making its exclusive international VOD debut; the busy Duplass Brothers' "The Intervention" and more. The presentation follows distribution deals signed by Mubi with studios eOne, Icon and StudioCanal to make titles including Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s "Amelie," Nicolas Winding Refn’s "Drive" and Francis Ford Coppola’s "The Conversation" available for Mubi audiences in the UK. Here's the full list of Berlinale shorts currently screening for Mubi subscribers: As Long as Shotguns »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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2015 Sundance Trading Card Series: #11. Heather McIntosh (Z for Zachariah)

5 February 2015 9:00 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Eric Lavallee: Name me three of your favorite “2014 discoveries”…

Heather McIntosh: MaddAddam Trilogy, Margaret Atwood. Volumina for Organ, György Ligeti. Mind Brains (Orange Twin Records)

Lavallee: In Z for Zachariah, Craig Zobel goes from a “Great World of Sound” (pardon the pun) to nothingness. How did you research dystopia, lifeless scapes and survivalism?

McIntosh: The score fits somewhere between pastoral and experimental. Research, I studied a lot of contemporary organ scores, like the Ligeti one above (not that the score really went that far out).

Lavallee: This is your second outing with Craig, your previous collaboration was the cringe worthy essay on victimization. In terms of instrument selection, what did you sprinkle onto Z?

McIntosh: For Compliance, it was cello driven. For Z for Zachariah, Cello is still there, but there is a larger chamber ensemble sound, pump organ, piano, choral ensemble, French horn, and a as always a sprinkling of electronic ambience. »

- Eric Lavallee

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17 moments of movie terror in the bathroom

5 February 2015 7:47 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

From toilet-based scares to nasty encounters in the shower, here's a selection of 17 memorable moments of terror in the bathroom...

Nb: the following contains potential spoilers and scenes which may be considered Nsfw.

The scariest moments in horror are often the most intimate - this is why knives are a far nastier, button-pushing instrument of death than the gun. As the Joker famously put it in The Dark Knight, “You can savour all those little emotions...”

Intimacy may be the key to understanding why, in horror films, so many dreadful things tend to happen in bathrooms. The bathroom is often where we go to be by ourselves - either to answer the call of nature, brush our teeth, or simply relax in the bath after a hectic day at work. Equally, the water closet also sees us at our most vulnerable: naked, or at least with our trousers down, and »

- ryanlambie

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Protagonist boards Coppola road movie

4 February 2015 10:00 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Protagonist boards Eleanor Coppola road-movie.

Diane Lane, Yvan Attal and Nicolas Cage are to star in Bonjour Anne, the narrative feature debut of Eleanor Coppola (Hearts Of Darkness), which UK outfit Protagonist Pictures has boarded ahead of the Efm.

The comic road movie follows a neglected movie producer’s wife whose life is forever changed by a two-day drive through France with her husband’s French business partner. 

St. Vincent producer and long-time American Zoetrope collaborator Fred Roos produces alongside Francis Ford Coppola’s company. ICM handles Us rights.

Shoot is due to get underway in May.

Eleanor Coppola, wife of Francis, was nominated for an Emmy award for her 1991 documentary Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker’s Apocalypse, which chronicles the remarkable behind-the-scenes story of her husband’s iconic Vietnam war film Apocalypse Now.

Roos, co-producer on Apocalypse Now, The Conversation and The Godfather Part II, also executive-produced Hearts of Darkness. »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Protagonist boards Nicolas Cage road movie

4 February 2015 10:00 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Protagonist boards Eleanor Coppola road-movie.

Diane Lane, Nicolas Cage and Yvan Attal are to star in Bonjour Anne, the narrative feature debut of Eleanor Coppola (Hearts Of Darkness), which UK outfit Protagonist Pictures has boarded ahead of the Efm.

The comic road movie follows a neglected movie producer’s wife whose life is forever changed by a two-day drive through France with her husband’s French business partner. 

St. Vincent producer and long-time American Zoetrope collaborator Fred Roos produces alongside Francis Ford Coppola’s company.

Shoot is due to get underway in May.

Eleanor Coppola, wife of Francis, was nominated for an Emmy award for her 1991 documentary Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker’s Apocalypse, which chronicles the remarkable behind-the-scenes story of her husband’s iconic Vietnam war film Apocalypse Now.

Roos, co-producer on Apocalypse Now, The Conversation and The Godfather Part II, also executive-produced Hearts of Darkness. »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Walter Murch to receive Locarno honour

4 February 2015 10:24 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Triple Oscar-winner to be honoured with the Vision Award.

The 68th Locarno Film Festival (Aug 5-15) is to give its Vision Award - Nescens to award-winning editor and sound designer Walter Murch. The award has previously been given to special effects wizard Douglas Trumbull and “Mister Steadicam” Garrett Brown.

Murch worked with George Lucas on Thx 1138 (1971) and American Graffiti (1973) and Francis Ford Coppola on The Rain People (1969), The Godfather (1972), The Conversation (1974) and The Godfather: Part II (1974).

His work with Coppola as sound designer on Apocalypse Now won him his first Oscar in 1980.

Following his own directorial debut in 1985 with Return to Oz, he subsequently won two more Academy Awards for both sound and film editing on Anthony Minghella’s The English Patient (1996) – the first and only time in history the same person has won the Oscar in both categories. In this respect he was repeating an earlier record set when he won double BAFTA awards in 1975 for »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Editors Guild Selects 75 Best Edited Films of All Time

4 February 2015 8:26 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Now this is a list that could result in a lot of fascinating dissection and thanks to HitFix it comes to our attention almost three years after it was originally released back in 2012, celebrating the Motion Picture Editors Guild's 75th anniversary. Over at HitFix, Kris Tapley asks, "Is this news to anyone elsec" Um, yes, I find it immensely interesting and a perfect starting point for anyone looking to further explore the art of film editing. In an accompanying article we get the particulars concerning what films were eligible and how films were to be considered: In our Jan-feb 12 issue, we asked Guild members to vote on what they consider to be the Best Edited Films of all time. Any feature-length film from any country in the world was eligible. And by "Best Edited," we explained, we didn't just mean picture; sound, music and mixing were to be considered as well. »

- Brad Brevet

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Walter Murch To Be Honored By Locarno Film Festival With Vision Award

4 February 2015 6:48 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Rome – Walter Murch, the multiple-Oscar-winning U.S. film editor and sound designer, whose name is closely linked to 1970’s directors such as George Lucas (“Thx 1138″ and “American Graffiti”) and Francis Ford Coppola, will be honored by the Locarno Film Festival with its Vision Award – Nescens dedicated to those whose intuitions and skills have left their mark on film history.

“Murch’s career has embraced first sound and then film editing, pursuing a concept of audio-visual composition that treats the two as inseparable,” the prominent Swiss fest dedicated to indie filmmaking pointed out in a statement.

Case in point is Coppola’s “The Conversation,” for which Murch won double BAFTA awards, for both sound and film editing, in 1975. His other credits with Coppola include “The Rain People,” “The Godfather,” and “Apocalypse Now,” for which he won his first Oscar, for best sound, in 1980. Murch subsequently won two more Academy Awards, »

- Nick Vivarelli

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What is the best-edited film of all time according to those who do the job?

3 February 2015 8:43 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

A random bit of researching on a Tuesday night led me to something I didn't know existed: The Motion Picture Editors Guild's list of the 75 best-edited films of all time. It was a feature in part celebrating the Guild's 75th anniversary in 2012. Is this news to anyone else? I confess to having missed it entirely. Naturally, I had to dig in. What was immediately striking to me about the list — which was decided upon by the Guild membership and, per instruction, was considered in terms of picture and sound editorial as opposed to just the former — was the most popular decade ranking. Naturally, the 1970s led with 17 mentions, but right on its heels was the 1990s. I wouldn't have expected that but I happen to agree with the assessment. Thelma Schoonmaker's work on "Raging Bull" came out on top, an objectively difficult choice to dispute, really. It was so transformative, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Streamfix: From Popeye Doyle to Wes Anderson - 6 Great Gene Hackman Performances

30 January 2015 2:09 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Icons age but they never fade.  Although it’s now been 11 years(!) since his last performance, the commitment to character Gene Hackman brought to every frame he ever appeared in make his performances even more gripping after decades of viewings. To every role Hackman played, whether in light comedy or intense drama, the reality of his characters’ inner turmoil was so real and bristling at the edges, his performances brought a stunning complexity to every scene, whether the script had earned it or not. Our greatest living film actor turns 85 today. He has sworn that he will never appear on screen again. There just are too many greats to choose from when looking through the Hackman catalog, but we suggest you raise a glass of Kentucky Bourbon and enjoy some of his finest work in these 6 films, all available on your finer streaming services. “The French Connection”  (Amazon, iTunes, Netflix) Hackman’s breakthrough starring role, »

- Richard Rushfield

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Redford on TCM: Dismal 'Gatsby,' Oscar winner 'Africa'

20 January 2015 7:10 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Robert Redford: 'The Great Gatsby' and 'The Way We Were' tonight on Turner Classic Movies Turner Classic Movies' Star of the Month Robert Redford returns this evening with three more films: two Sydney Pollack-directed efforts, Out of Africa and The Way We Were, and Jack Clayton's film version of F. Scott Fitzgerald's classic novel The Great Gatsby. (See TCM's Robert Redford film schedule below. See also: "On TCM: Robert Redford Movies.") 'The Great Gatsby': Robert Redford as Jay Gatsby Released by Paramount Pictures, the 1974 film version of The Great Gatsby had prestige oozing from just about every cinematic pore. The film was based on what some consider the greatest American novel ever written. Francis Ford Coppola, whose directing credits included the blockbuster The Godfather, and who, that same year, was responsible for both The Godfather Part II and The Conversation, penned the adaptation. Multiple Tony winner David Merrick (Becket, »

- Andre Soares

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Review: Arthur Penn's "Night Moves" (1975) Starring Gene Hackman, Warner Archive Streaming Service

11 January 2015 3:32 AM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Don Stradley

The final image of Arthur Penn’s “Night Moves” certainly gets the movie pundits in a lather. The scene consists of Gene Hackman as private eye Harry Moseby, shot to pieces but still trying to steer his motor boat to shore. Bleeding badly from his wounds, he’s unable to reach the gears; he ends up setting the boat in a circling motion. From above, we see Harry’s boat circling aimlessly in the Gulf Stream. This scene, which brings the film to a finish, has been described as a metaphor for many things, including America’s lost identity after the Watergate era, to Moseby’s own fruitless search for the truth, to Penn’s own floundering career. To me, it always looks like the boat is going down a drain (or a toilet). It’s the sort of ending that leaves a viewer wondering if you’ve missed something, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

18 items from 2015


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