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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 28 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Steven Soderbergh Picks 11 Favorite Films

1 July 2015 1:41 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

This vintage list dates back to 1989, when Steven Soderbergh was hot off his debut indie sensation "Sex, Lies and Videotape," which managed the rare feat of scoring the Palme d'Or after already premiering (and winning) at Sundance. Then in his mid-20s, Soderbergh was already well-read in the American classics. And now, after dozens of features and TV's "The Knick" and all but directing this weekend's "Magic Mike" sequel, he ranks with most of the names you see below. (Hat tip: The Film Stage.) Read More: Why "Magic Mike Xxl" Is Still a Soderbergh Movie "All the President's Men" (Alan J. Pakula, 1976) "Annie Hall" (Woody Allen, 1977) "Citizen Kane" (Orson Welles, 1941) "The Conversation" (Francis Ford Coppola, 1974) "The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T" (Roy Rowland, 1953) "The Godfather" (Francis Ford Coppola, 1972) "The Godfather: Part II" (Francis Ford Coppola, »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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25 Years In La Part 1: Gene Hackman, Eazy-e, and Albert Brooks defending a film

8 June 2015 6:30 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

When I left Tampa, it was the crack of dawn. I was in the passenger's seat of the Chevette that Scott Swan owned, and we were on our way to California to be rich and famous. I was 20 years old. I thought I had all the answers. I had a screenplay called "The President Must Die!" with me that I was sure was going to be produced by the following summer with an all-star cast. We had all of them picked. Harrison Ford, Robert DeNiro, Robin Williams. Scott and I had spent the entire spring writing it, and we were done. Absolutely, completely, positively done. It was perfect. It was going to be a huge hit. This was the logical next step. This wasn't our first script, either. We had written a script together called "Moondance" during my first year of college, and a script called "A Weekend Away" during my second year of college. »

- Drew McWeeny

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Second Opinion – Tomorrowland (2015)

24 May 2015 1:37 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Tomorrowland, 2015.

Directed by Brad Bird.

Starring George Clooney, Britt RobertsonThomas RobinsonRaffey Cassidy and Hugh Laurie.

Synopsis:

Bound by a shared destiny, a teen bursting with scientific curiosity and a former boy-genius inventor embark on a mission to unearth the secrets of a place somewhere in time and space that exists in their collective memory.

The world’s ending, it’s all our fault and Disney want you to know about it, but first let’s have a fun time at the cinema, buy the merchandise and check out the theme park before the cities crumble. It’s this hypocrisy which pulls director Brad Bird’s Tomorrowland in one direction only to push it into another; resulting in a film which, whilst being fun at times, never feels anywhere as genuine as it needs to be.

I appreciate and welcome a massive budget family movie which isn’t based »

- Gary Collinson

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The 5 Best Films of Francis Ford Coppola

21 May 2015 2:33 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor's Note: Indiewire has partnered with the El Rey Network in support of the iTunes release of their original show Director’s Chair. Top directors tackle insightful questions only other directors would think to ask. Find out more here.] Read More: The 5 Best Films of Quentin Tarantino Francis Ford Coppola's 1970s classics still hold a contemporary feel and artistic vitality, four decades later. From the consummate tale of family and power in "The Godfather" to the ever-prescient political thriller "The Conversation," his best works are definitive genre exercises, blending unwavering realism with escalating tension and a potent moral consideration.  Though his directorial stamp is unmistakable, Coppola has under his belt among the most celebrated family, political, crime and war films in the American canon. He has twice won the Academy Award for Best Picture and Best Director, and is one of only eight filmmakers to win the Cannes Film »

- David Canfield

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Le Conversazioni 2015 by Anne-Katrin Titze

10 May 2015 1:00 PM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Stephen Sondheim and Joyce Carol Oates in conversation before Antonio Monda's Le Conversazioni Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Following his fall 2014 Le Conversazioni with Zadie Smith (White Teeth) and Patrick McGrath (Asylum and Spider), Antonio Monda invited Joyce Carol Oates and Stephen Sondheim to discuss films that influenced their lives and work.

Henry Hathaway's Niagara, Francis Ford Coppola's The Conversation, Martin Scorsese's Raging Bull and Elia Kazan's On The Waterfront were chosen by Joyce Carol Oates.

George Stevens' The More The Merrier, Mike van Diem's Character (Karakter), Krzysztof Zanussi's The Contract and Alfred Hitchcock's Shadow Of A Doubt were picked by Stephen Sondheim.

Le Conversazioni and Rome Film Festival Artistic Director Antonio Monda Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Marilyn Monroe, Dustin Hoffman, Katharine Hepburn, Jean Arthur, Walk Don't Run with Cary Grant, Privacy, Gene Hackman, West Side Story, Vertigo, The Rules Of The Game, Marlon Brando, »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Why 1974 was the best year in film history

29 April 2015 11:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century.  Click here for a complete list of our essays. I was one of the first to select years for this particular exercise, which probably allowed me to select the correct year. The answer is, of course, 1974 and all other answers are wrong. No matter what your criteria happens to be, 1974 is going to come out on top. Again, this is not ambiguous or open to debate. We have to start, of course, with the best of the best. "Chinatown" is one of the greatest movies ever made. You can't structure a thriller better than Robert Towne and Roman Polanski do, nor shoot a Los Angeles movie better than John Alonzo has done. Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway give the best performances of their careers, which is no small achievement. If you ask »

- Daniel Fienberg

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Karlovy Vary unveils 50th plans

28 April 2015 7:16 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Mel Gibson to film special trailer for the festival; plans for Lebanese cinema focus and tributes to late Us actor John Cazale and Chris Penn.

The Karlovy Vary International Film Festival (Kviff) has unveiled plans for its 50th ‘annivarysary’ edition, set to run July 3-11.

The jubilee edition will include a look at recent Lebanese cinema, a retrospective of late Soviet-Ukrainian director Larisa Shepitko’s work and tributes to Us actors John Cazale and Chris Penn.

Actor-director Mel Gibson will also film a special trailer for the festival, set to be shot in Los Angeles in early May. The Lethal Weapon star received the Crystal Globe for Outstanding Artistic Contribution to World Cinema at last year’s Kviff.

Gibson continues a tradition that sees the recipients of this award feature in a short trailer for the following festival. It will be written and directed by Martin Krejčí, who has collaborated with Ivan Zachariáš since the beginning of the »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Why 1998 Was the Best Year In Film History

27 April 2015 12:46 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century.  Check here for a complete list of our essays. Just one glance at the Oscar nominees for 1998 might make it seem less a questionable choice for “best year in film” — and more an insane one.   Instead of a 1974 – The Godfather II, The Conversation, Chinatown, Blazing Saddles, Young Frankenstein, etc – or even a 1994, where Shawshank, Quiz Show, and Pulp Fiction lost to Gump – you choose a year where the Oscars would allow Roberto Benigni to climb atop both the figurative and literal chairs of the Shrine?   Fine, step away from the Oscars. Would you still celebrate a year that saw not one, but two movies about asteroids threatening the Earth?  A year that saw such scars carved across cinematic history as Patch Adams, My Giant, Stepmom, and Krippendorf’s Tribe?   It bears repeating: Krippendorf’S Tribe? »

- Michael Oates Palmer

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Time Machine: Veterans Wallach and Coppola - Godfather 3 in Common - Are Special Oscar Honorees

24 April 2015 12:28 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson on the Oscars' Red Carpet Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson at the Academy Awards Eli Wallach and wife Anne Jackson are seen above arriving at the 2011 Academy Awards ceremony, held on Sunday, Feb. 27, at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. The 95-year-old Wallach had received an Honorary Oscar at the Governors Awards in November 2010. See also: "Doris Day Inexplicably Snubbed by Academy," "Maureen O'Hara Honorary Oscar," "Honorary Oscars: Mary Pickford, Greta Garbo Among Rare Women Recipients," and "Hayao Miyazaki Getting Honorary Oscar." Delayed film debut The Actors Studio-trained Eli Wallach was to have made his film debut in Fred Zinnemann's Academy Award-winning 1953 blockbuster From Here to Eternity. Ultimately, however, Frank Sinatra – then a has-been following a string of box office duds – was cast for a pittance, getting beaten to a pulp by a pre-stardom Ernest Borgnine. For his bloodied efforts, Sinatra went on »

- D. Zhea

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10 unsung heroes behind Star Wars: A New Hope

22 April 2015 11:08 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

The Star Wars franchise is going strong 38 years later. But what about the artists and filmmakers who helped make the 1977 original a hit?

In theatres all over the world in 1977, audiences thrilled at the sights and sounds of Star Wars. Harking back to a bygone age of Flash Gordon and Buck Rogers, it also pointed forward to the coming age of ubiquitous computers and special effects-led blockbusters.

But while the triumphant fanfare of John Williams' score gave Star Wars a confident swagger, its success was far from preordained. George Lucas reworked his script time and again; studios turned his concept down; even the production was rushed and torturous.

By now, the contribution George Lucas, John Williams and Star Wars' cast made to cinema is well documented. But what about some of the other artists, technicians and fellow filmmakers who helped to make the movie such a success? Here's »

- ryanlambie

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The Conversation: Drew Morton and Landon Palmer discuss ‘Blow-Up’

19 March 2015 7:12 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Conversation is a new feature at Sound on Sight bringing together Drew Morton and Landon Palmer in a passionate debate about cinema new and old. For their third piece, they will discuss Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow Up.

****

Landon’s Take:

The cultural impact of Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow Up would be very difficult to overemphasize. Upon release, Andrew Sarris referred to the film as “a mod masterpiece” and ‘Playboy’ critic Arthur Knight went so far as comparing the film to Hiroshima mon amour, Rome Open City, and Citizen Kane in its potential influence on filmmaking. The film was also a massive hit worldwide and the tenth highest grossing film in the United States in 1966 – a memento of a brief window in time in which an art film by an Italian auteur could also do boffo box office. And, having been denied a seal by the Production Code Administration, Blow Up »

- Drew Morton

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Star Wars Actor Ford Injured in Plane Accident in Los Angeles Area

5 March 2015 4:43 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Harrison Ford injured in plane accident (image: Harrison Ford as Colonel Graff in 'Ender's Game') Star Wars and Raiders of the Lost Ark actor Harrison Ford was supposed to be in critical condition – later reports have upgraded that to "fair" or "stable" condition – following an accident with a small airplane on Los Angeles' Westside. Earlier this afternoon (March 5, 2015), a vintage, one-engine two-seater crash landed at the Penmar Golf Course, located in the Los Angeles suburb of Venice, not far from the Pacific Ocean and just west of Santa Monica Airport. Its pilot, 72-year-old Harrison Ford, was found "seriously" injured. He was alone on the plane. There were no injuries on the ground. As explained in the Los Angeles Times, "fire officials would not identify the victim of the crash but said he was conscious and breathing when paramedics arrived." Ford was later transported to an unidentified hospital. Eleven »

- Zac Gille

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Costume Designers Guild Awards: “Birdman,” “Grand Budapest,” “Into the Woods” Top Films

17 February 2015 10:13 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Updated 11:34 p.m. The Costume Designers Guild Awards may come too late to influence the Oscars race, but they managed to confirm what already seems to be clear: “Birdman” is the film to beat.

Albert Wolsky won the contemporary film category for Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu’s backstage tale, while legends Colleen Atwood and Milena Canonero took prizes for “Into the Woods” (fantasy film) and “The Grand Budapest Hotel” (period film).

Birdman” has a broad swath of awards support from numerous guilds, but “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is hot on its heels among design orgs.

In the TV categories, oft-honored “American Horror Story: Freak Show” took honors for made-for/miniseries. “True Detective” was honored as top contemporary TV series, and Michele Clapton won for “Game of Thrones” in the period/fantasy TV series category.

Colleen Atwood, winner for “Into the Woods” in the fantasy film category, recounted a fitting »

- David S. Cohen

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Costume Designers Guild Awards: “Birdman,” “Grand Budapest,” “Into the Woods” Top Films

17 February 2015 10:13 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Updated 11:34 p.m. The Costume Designers Guild Awards may come too late to influence the Oscars race, but they managed to confirm what already seems to be clear: “Birdman” is the film to beat.

Albert Wolsky won the contemporary film category for Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu’s backstage tale, while legends Colleen Atwood and Milena Canonero took prizes for “Into the Woods” (fantasy film) and “The Grand Budapest Hotel” (period film).

Birdman” has a broad swath of awards support from numerous guilds, but “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is hot on its heels among design orgs.

In the TV categories, oft-honored “American Horror Story: Freak Show” took honors for made-for/miniseries. “True Detective” was honored as top contemporary TV series, and Michele Clapton won for “Game of Thrones” in the period/fantasy TV series category.

Colleen Atwood, winner for “Into the Woods” in the fantasy film category, recounted a fitting »

- David S. Cohen

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Exclusive: Watch Francis Ford Coppola Talk to Robert Rodriguez About "The Things They Fire You For"

17 February 2015 7:37 PM, PST | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

Even if the only movies that Francis Ford Coppola ever made were the three Godfather films, he'd still be a cinematic legend. But he didn't just stop there: The Conversation, The Outsiders, Rumble Fish, Dracula, Apocalypse Now. The list goes on and on. He is, simply put, one of the Greats. That's why Coppola is such a welcome choice for The Director's Chair, a fantastic ongoing series on El Rey Network where Robert Rodriguez chats candidly with filmmakers about the entirety of their careers. In the past he's hosted Guillermo del Toro, Quentin Tarantino and John Carpenter, and they've all resulted in very worthwhile conversations about the realities of being a working artist in Hollywood. Speaking of that, we've got a clip from the upcoming The...

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»

- Peter Hall

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From Kubrick to Marilyn Monroe, Oscar Has a Stellar List of Shut-Outs

13 February 2015 4:54 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

There are 195 individuals nominated for Oscar this year. And when the winners are named Feb. 22, they will become part of film history, joining such greats as Billy Wilder, Ingrid Bergman, Ben Hecht and Walt Disney.

But 80% of the contenders will go home empty-handed. However, there is good news: They are in good company as well.

Here is a sampling of nominees that didn’t win: “Citizen Kane,” “Chinatown” and “Star Wars”; directors Alfred Hitchcock, Howard Hawks, Stanley Kubrick and Ingmar Bergman; writers Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, Dashiell Hammett, John Steinbeck, Graham Greene, Harold Pinter and David Mamet; actors Gloria Swanson in “Sunset Blvd.”; Audrey Hepburn in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”; and Peter O’Toole in “Lawrence of Arabia.”

They managed to do Ok, though.

It’s hard to say why they didn’t win. Sometimes tastes change. Sometimes there’s too much competition in one year. Frank Capra’s 1939 “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington »

- Tim Gray

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Missing Out on Berlin? Stream Award-Winning Shorts from the Archives

5 February 2015 12:52 PM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

As the Berlin International Film Festival gets underway abroad this week, you might be feeling a little left out of the buzz. Worry not, because streaming curator Mubi has made Berlinale shorts available to a global audience for the first time. In spirit of the 60th anniversary of Berlin's Golden Bear for shorts, a curated selection of the fest's winning films is now streaming on the site. Highlights include last year's "As Long as Shotguns Remain," making its exclusive international VOD debut; the busy Duplass Brothers' "The Intervention" and more. The presentation follows distribution deals signed by Mubi with studios eOne, Icon and StudioCanal to make titles including Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s "Amelie," Nicolas Winding Refn’s "Drive" and Francis Ford Coppola’s "The Conversation" available for Mubi audiences in the UK. Here's the full list of Berlinale shorts currently screening for Mubi subscribers: As Long as Shotguns »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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2015 Sundance Trading Card Series: #11. Heather McIntosh (Z for Zachariah)

5 February 2015 9:00 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Eric Lavallee: Name me three of your favorite “2014 discoveries”…

Heather McIntosh: MaddAddam Trilogy, Margaret Atwood. Volumina for Organ, György Ligeti. Mind Brains (Orange Twin Records)

Lavallee: In Z for Zachariah, Craig Zobel goes from a “Great World of Sound” (pardon the pun) to nothingness. How did you research dystopia, lifeless scapes and survivalism?

McIntosh: The score fits somewhere between pastoral and experimental. Research, I studied a lot of contemporary organ scores, like the Ligeti one above (not that the score really went that far out).

Lavallee: This is your second outing with Craig, your previous collaboration was the cringe worthy essay on victimization. In terms of instrument selection, what did you sprinkle onto Z?

McIntosh: For Compliance, it was cello driven. For Z for Zachariah, Cello is still there, but there is a larger chamber ensemble sound, pump organ, piano, choral ensemble, French horn, and a as always a sprinkling of electronic ambience. »

- Eric Lavallee

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17 moments of movie terror in the bathroom

5 February 2015 7:47 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

From toilet-based scares to nasty encounters in the shower, here's a selection of 17 memorable moments of terror in the bathroom...

Nb: the following contains potential spoilers and scenes which may be considered Nsfw.

The scariest moments in horror are often the most intimate - this is why knives are a far nastier, button-pushing instrument of death than the gun. As the Joker famously put it in The Dark Knight, “You can savour all those little emotions...”

Intimacy may be the key to understanding why, in horror films, so many dreadful things tend to happen in bathrooms. The bathroom is often where we go to be by ourselves - either to answer the call of nature, brush our teeth, or simply relax in the bath after a hectic day at work. Equally, the water closet also sees us at our most vulnerable: naked, or at least with our trousers down, and »

- ryanlambie

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Protagonist boards Coppola road movie

4 February 2015 10:00 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Protagonist boards Eleanor Coppola road-movie.

Diane Lane, Yvan Attal and Nicolas Cage are to star in Bonjour Anne, the narrative feature debut of Eleanor Coppola (Hearts Of Darkness), which UK outfit Protagonist Pictures has boarded ahead of the Efm.

The comic road movie follows a neglected movie producer’s wife whose life is forever changed by a two-day drive through France with her husband’s French business partner. 

St. Vincent producer and long-time American Zoetrope collaborator Fred Roos produces alongside Francis Ford Coppola’s company. ICM handles Us rights.

Shoot is due to get underway in May.

Eleanor Coppola, wife of Francis, was nominated for an Emmy award for her 1991 documentary Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker’s Apocalypse, which chronicles the remarkable behind-the-scenes story of her husband’s iconic Vietnam war film Apocalypse Now.

Roos, co-producer on Apocalypse Now, The Conversation and The Godfather Part II, also executive-produced Hearts of Darkness. »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 28 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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