IMDb > "Columbo" A Friend in Deed (1974)

"Columbo" A Friend in Deed (1974)

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Overview

User Rating:
7.9/10   939 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Peter S. Fischer (written by)
Richard Levinson (created by) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for A Friend in Deed on IMDbPro.
TV Series:
Original Air Date:
5 May 1974 (Season 3, Episode 8)
Genre:
Plot:
A police commissioner provides a false alibi for a wife killer, but then expects an alibi in return. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
User Reviews:
Enthralling, stylishly-scripted and plotted, vintage Columbo story See more (19 total) »

Cast

 (Episode Cast) (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Peter Falk ... Columbo

Richard Kiley ... Mark Halperin

Rosemary Murphy ... Margaret Halperin
Michael McGuire ... Hugh Caldwell

Val Avery ... Artie Jessup

Eric Christmas ... Bruno Wexler
Eleanor Zee ... Thelma

John Finnegan ... Lt. Duffy

Arlene Martel ... Salesgirl (as Arlene Martell)
Victor Campos ... Doyle
Joshua Bryant ... Dr. MacMurray
John Calvin ... Charlie Shoup
Byron Morrow ... Amos Lawrence
James V. Christy ... Sharkey

Alma Beltran ... Mrs. Fernandez
Albert Popwell ... Al Como
Ben Marino ... Sgt. Ned Randall
Judson Morgan ... Charles
T.J. Castronovo ... Policeman (as Tom Castronova)
Paul Sorensen ... Police Pilot
Bernie Kuby ... Nathan Flowers
Mike Lally ... 2nd Bartender
Richard Lanci ... 1st Patrolman (as Richard Lance)
Eldon Burke ... Photographer
Jack Krupnick ... Limousine Driver
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Duke Fishman ... Cop (uncredited)
Ben Frommer ... Bartender (uncredited)
Mickey Golden ... Reporter (uncredited)
Michael Jeffers ... Barfly (uncredited)
Cosmo Sardo ... Club Member (uncredited)

Dianne Travis ... Woman In Bar (uncredited)
Max Wagner ... Barfly (uncredited)

Episode Crew
Directed by
Ben Gazzara 
 
Writing credits
Peter S. Fischer (written by)

Richard Levinson (created by) &
William Link (created by)

Produced by
Edward K. Dodds .... producer
Dean Hargrove .... executive producer
Roland Kibbee .... executive producer
 
Original Music by
Dick DeBenedictis  (as Dick De Benedictis)
Billy Goldenberg 
 
Cinematography by
William Cronjager (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Robert L. Kimble 
 
Art Direction by
John W. Corso 
 
Set Decoration by
Bill McLaughlin (set decorations) (as William McLaughlin)
 
Production Management
Brad H. Aronson .... unit manager (as Brad Aronson)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Phil Cook .... assistant director (as Phillip Cook)
 
Sound Department
Wallace R. Bearden .... sound (as Wallace Bearden)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Grady Hunt .... costumes
 
Editorial Department
Richard Belding .... editorial supervisor
Arnold Baker .... assistant editor (uncredited)
Steve Johnson .... colorist (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Henry Mancini .... composer: Mystery Movie theme
Hal Mooney .... music supervisor
 
Other crew
Wayne Fitzgerald .... main title design
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
USA:95 min | USA:98 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Australia:PG (video rating) | Finland:K-18 (2005) (DVD) (self applied) | UK:12 (video rating) (2005)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Richard Kiley and Rosemary Murphy had not met before shooting their first scene, where Kiley's character Mark Halperin dives into a swimming pool to pull out his drowned wife, played by Murphy, and attempts to give her mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. Upon finishing the scene, Kiley held out his hand to Murphy and said, "How do you do? I'm Richard Kiley."See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: Dr. MacMurray (Joshua Bryant) first appears with Commissioner Halperin after his wife's murder, reminding him to take the pills he prescribed for him. A few minutes later, as the body is taken away, Columbo asks him to check for a few things in the autopsy. A personal physician and a coroner?See more »
Quotes:
Columbo:You must have a lot of those, sir.
Mark Halperin:What?
Columbo:Gut feelings.
Mark Halperin:What're you talking about?
Columbo:Well, you had a gut feeling last night.
Mark Halperin:I don't know what you're talking about. What do you mean "last night?"
Columbo:When you asked for me to report to the Caldwell house.
Mark Halperin:Yes?
Columbo:I found out that you asked for me when you first called in.
Mark Halperin:I did.
[...]
See more »
Movie Connections:
References Strangers on a Train (1951)See more »
Soundtrack:
Jesus, Joy of Man's DesiringSee more »

FAQ

List: Murder swaps
See more »
23 out of 23 people found the following review useful.
Enthralling, stylishly-scripted and plotted, vintage Columbo story, 17 September 2005
Author: The Welsh Raging Bull (leighton.phillips@sihe.ac.uk) from Port Talbot, South Wales, UK

In all honesty, Columbo adventures do not come much better than this one, simply because plot, script, acting, clue development and analysis, Columbo's characterisation and direction all interlink to captivating and thoroughly entertaining effect.

The plot is easily the best in the series: man kills wife after argument, rings his friend (the Deputy Police Commissioner) - he makes it look like a burglary gone wrong (taking advantage of a recent spate of burglaries in the area) and he also kills his own wife later on for her money, further capitalising on the "burglary gone wrong" theory.

In typical Ben Gazzara style, the story is carefully and deliberately developed with Columbo's meticulous appreciation of the crime scene the first hint that he is going to disagree with the prevailing burglary theory.

Falk's scenes with Kiley are well-crafted and incisive; Columbo is not afraid to be forthright about his observations in front of his boss as he subtly uncovers the truth.

The conclusion is arguably the best entrapment of a murderer in the entire series; the Deputy Police Commissioner turns to Columbo, after the latter states that he thinks that he was involved in both murders, and says "you've just lost your badge my friend!". The ensuing scenes are an absolute classic and thoroughly uphold the decisive quality that prevailed throughout the story. Watch it!

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