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1-20 of 94 items from 2011   « Prev | Next »


The Best of the Best Movies of the Year!

30 December 2011 12:09 PM, PST | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

By Scott Mendelson

HollywoodNews.com: This time, it’s the best of the best. Of course ‘best’ is a subjective term, so you might want to consider these my ‘favorites’. Despite what everyone likes to whine about at the end of every year, 2011 was in fact one of the better years in a good long time. Maybe it was the effects of the 2007 WGA strike wearing off, maybe it was just dumb luck, but on the whole, movies, especially mainstream movies, were pretty on-spot more often than they weren’t. But just as important, most of the year-end Oscar bait was actually quite good, so this is a year where I don’t have to half-heartedly apologize for having a list filled with movies nobody saw and mainstream pictures that no one admits to liking. Even if it took 1/3 of the year to really get cooking, 2011 was an uncommonly solid »

- Scott Mendelson

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My favourite film: Chinatown

28 December 2011 1:43 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Paul Macinnes continues our writer's favourite film series with the movie that left him chilled and overwhelmed – Roman Polanski's detective tale that exploded the genre conventions

Does this review do the film justice, or is it case dismissed? File your own report here or join in the comments section below

Chinatown is a detective story. It's set in Los Angeles, like many of the best are, and at first glance you could even mistake it for a tribute to the city. Roman Polanski's film escorts you around it, encourages you to bathe in the rich Californian light and take in the lush vistas. It's only at the end you realise the tour has been slowly, almost casually, ushering you into a room containing the most depraved human wickedness imaginable. Chinatown is definitely my favourite film.

Growing up, I spent a lot of time with private detectives. After teething on the Hardy Boys, »

- Paul MacInnes

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Afghanistan Hazing Cases Echo ‘A Few Good Men’

27 December 2011 9:00 AM, PST | Speakeasy/Wall Street Journal | See recent Speakeasy/Wall Street Journal news »

Everett Collection Scene from “A Few Good Men,” 1992, with Jack Nicholson

Last weekend, the remaining soldiers deployed as part of U.S. combat missions in Iraq came home to the welcoming arms of their families. But tens of thousands of American troops remain in the field in Afghanistan. And, as the longest war in our nation’s history continues into the new year, commentators are noting unsettling parallels between the controversial deaths of two soldiers fighting in that campaign — both »

- Jeff Yang

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TCM Classic Film Festival To Celebrate 100th Anniversary Of Paramount Pictures

19 December 2011 3:42 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) has unveiled additional programming and events for the 2012 edition of the TCM Classic Film Festival, including a celebration of the 100th anniversary of Paramount Pictures. Robert Evans, longtime producer and former head of production for Paramount, is set to take part in the tribute, which will focus on the studio’s 1970s renaissance. In addition, the TCM Classic Film Festival is slated to include a look at The Noir Style, a tribute to legendary costume designer Travis Banton, a look at art deco in the movies, a collection of early cinematic rarities and much more.

TCM.s own Robert Osborne will once again serve as official host for the four-day, star-studded event, which will take pace Thursday, April 12 . Sunday, April 15, 2012, in Hollywood. Passes are on sale now through the official festival website: http://www.tcm.com/festival.

The Paramount Renaissance

The TCM Classic Film Festival will »

- Michelle McCue

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Top 10 Hollywood Actors Still In Business

16 December 2011 7:05 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Much of our lurid film community is of the belief that America’s acting prowess died with its classic stars like Marlon Brando, James Stewart, Humphrey Bogart, Katharine Hepburn, Elizabeth Taylor, and Grace Kelly. However, I’m here to argue that America’s actors are stronger than ever and can match up toe to toe with the likes of both Europe and Asia.

The list will be split into two parts: in part one, I delve into the modern world of Hollywood actors with actresses soon to follow in part two.

Part one: Top Ten Actors Working In Hollywood Today

Actor With The Most Potential To Hit It Big: Paddy Considine

Before I begin the list, I want to take a moment to discuss an actor whom I believe has enormous potential. While not American born, British actor Paddy Considine has been in his fair share of American films like In America, »

- Connor Folse

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Tiff Bell Lightbox Retrospective: Roman Polanski, God of Carnage

16 December 2011 12:58 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

This weekend sees the start of a new retrospective at the wonderful Tiff Bell Lightbox in Toronto. In anticipation of Roman Polanski’s upcoming film, Carnage, Tiff has decided to highlight a selection from his filmography. The retrospective is incomplete, missing at least a couple key films in the long career of the established, controversial director, but the offerings on hand are indeed great. The series begins with Knife in the Water on the 17th and continues through the 25th with a screening of The Ghost Writer. In between, there are screenings of Chinatown, Cul-de-sac, Repulsion, The Tenant and Rosemary’s Baby.

Chinatown and Rosemary’s Baby are quite popular even in the mainstream, though the chance to see them on the big screen is not something to pass up. Even better, though, is the chance for the uninitiated to check out Polanski’s earlier work.

Here are a couple »

- Corey Atad

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The God Of Carnage: The Complete Films Of Roman Polanski

16 December 2011 11:54 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

With a career marked by controversy and tragedy, triumphs and disasters, that Roman Polanski has shaken off personal obstacles and professional setbacks is a feat in itself. But that he has become a legendary and influential filmmaker in the process, speaks to his remarkable strength and skill behind the camera no matter how you feel about the man personally. Polanski is well known as a craftsman of stylish thrillers, most notably the informal "Apartment Trilogy" of "Repulsion," "Rosemary's Baby," and "The Tenant," films that trade on nightmarish images, claustrophobic spaces, and creeping paranoia. But looking back over his filmography one is immediately struck by the breadth of genres he has tackled, from the psychological potboilers above, to literary adaptations (“Oliver Twist”), swashbuckling adventure (“Pirates”), World War II drama (“The Pianist”) and sizzling noir (“Chinatown”). »

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Ranked: Roman Polanski Films from Worst to Best

14 December 2011 4:02 PM, PST | Nerve | See recent Nerve news »

Ranked: Roman Polanski Films from Worst to Best In tribute to Carnage, we reassess the director of Chinatown and The Pianist. by Austin Duerst Roman Polanski made a name for himself at a young age with his keen and original insight into the dark recesses of the human psyche. His films, with their grim, unflinching depictions of injustice, helped open the doors for future filmmakers to pursue dark subject matter without fear of censorship. With the release of his nineteenth feature film, Carnage, we take a look back at the films of one of cinema's greatest directors.  19. Pirates (1986) Long before pirate fever swept the world with Disney's Caribbean series, a lot of other pirate movies earned their place shipwrecked along the shores of cinematic history. Roman Polanski's Pirates is one of them. The idea must've seemed promising in its initial stages (after all, someone coughed [...] »

- Austin Duerst

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Guy Richie Targets "The Man From U.N.C.L.E."

8 December 2011 1:40 PM, PST | SneakPeek | See recent SneakPeek news »

According to internet reports, director Guy Ritchie ("Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows") will reteam with producer Lionel Wigram, to shoot a big screen Warners remake of the 1960's classic spy TV series "The Man From U.N..C.L.E."

The new film will be produced by David Dobkin, Jeffrey Kleeman and John Davis.

The original NBC TV series, broadcast September 1964 to January 1968, followed the exploits of two Us secret agents, played by actors Robert Vaughn ("The Magnificent Seven") and David McCallum ("The Great Escape") , who work for the clandestine, international law-enforcement agency 'U.N.C.L.E.' ('United Network Command for Law and Enforcement').

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer produced 105 "U.N.C.L.E." episodes, originally developed by Sam Rolfe for executive producer Norman Felton, with"James Bond" author Ian Fleming contributing characters 'Napoleon Solo' and 'April Dancer', to series scriptwriters Robert Towne ("Chinatown") and Harlan Ellison ("The City On The Edge »

- Michael Stevens

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"Roman Polanski" @ Tiff Bell Lightbox- December 17-25, 2011

5 December 2011 5:26 PM, PST | SneakPeek | See recent SneakPeek news »

TorontoFilm.Net reports that the Tiff Bell Lightbox run of director Roman Polanski's "Carnage", opens Friday December 30, 2011.

Tiff will also host a retrospective looking back at specific films during Polanski's career, tracing the recurring themes that have shaped his vision.

"Roman Polanski" runs December 17 - December 25, 2011, including special screenings of the features "Knife in the Water", "Cul-de-sac", "Chinatown", "Repulsion", "The Tenant", "Rosemary's Baby", and "The Ghost Writer" :

"...In a career spanning more than fifty years, Roman Polanski has firmly established himself as one of the contemporary masters of cinema with his nerve-wrackingly suspenseful and darkly comic portraits of cruelty, violence, claustrophobia and madness.

"Often confining his characters within suffocatingly cloistered locations—a sailboat on a lonely lake, a crumbling castle, an isolated beach house and a succession of ominous apartment houses—Polanski observes with cynical, diabolical glee as the thin pretenses of civilization are quickly stripped away in the face of human vanities, »

- Michael Stevens

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The ‘Blue Velvet’ Project, #50

5 December 2011 6:57 AM, PST | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Second #2350, 39:10

1. Dorothy, the knife dangerously close to Jeffrey’s nose, perhaps unintentionally recalling the infamous nose-slicing moment in Roman Polanski’s Chinatown.

2. Has Jeffrey caused her to act like this, or has Frank? Jeffrey is not Frank, although Dorothy treats him like she might were she to find him hiding, unarmed, in her closet.

3. In the fevered dream of Blue Velvet, what causes what is impossible to untangle, as if concepts like “before” and “after” don’t mean a thing.

4. In Steve Erickson’s novel Zeroville, Vikar—who becomes an editor not just of film but of a version of reality itself—says this:

The scenes of a movie . . . can be shot out of sequence not because it’s more convenient, but because all the scenes of a movie are really happening at the same time. No scene really leads to the next, all scenes lead to each other. »

- Nicholas Rombes

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The Descendants Review

18 November 2011 4:18 PM, PST | FilmJunk | See recent FilmJunk news »

The Descendants Directed by: Alexander Payne Written by: Alexander Payne, Nat Faxon & Jim Rash (screenplay), Kaui Hart Hemmings (novel) Starring: George Clooney, Shailene Woodley, Amara Miller, Nick Krause Alexander Payne paints a different picture of Hawaii. In the opening montage of his new film The Descendants, the director not so gently reminds us that the island "paradise," with its little-photographed cities and suburbs, isn't exactly the Eden we've been sold. The sequence perfectly reflects Payne's no bullshit pragmatism, seen last in 2004's excellent Sideways. For gluttons for Payne, The Descendants has been a long time coming. Based on a novel by Kaui Hart Hemmings, the film follows George Clooney as Matt King, a wealthy lawyer with hereditary ties to Hawaiian royalty, and the sole trustee of his family's thousands of acres of untapped land. As King circles a buyer for the valuable property, his wife falls off a jet ski »

- Colin

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The Iron Lady: first screening

15 November 2011 2:28 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Phyllida Lloyd's film gives us Thatcher without Thatcherism, writes Xan Brooks but Meryl Streep is astonishing

Was it a dream or is it a nightmare? In the early years of the 21st century a frail old woman totters around her London home, assailed by memories that rise up unbidden. They tell her that her husband still lives, and that she remains the prime minister, the cherished daughter of a nation of shopkeepers, called upon to save Britain from ruin. For the old woman, these ghosts provide reassurance, a sunny remembrance of days gone by. Others, by contrast, may be hard pressed to keep the horrors at bay.

While one doubts whether Baroness Thatcher would wholeheartedly approve of any large screen biopic, it seems likely that she'd have a certain, sneaking affection for The Iron Lady, which prints the legend and keeps the dissent on spartan rations. Yes, the film »

- Xan Brooks

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Why Hugh Jackman's Wolverine needs a different beast of an X-Men film

4 November 2011 11:09 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Can James Mangold, director of X-Men follow-up The Wolverine, give Jackman's clawed superhero a film that isn't flawed?

There's a moment in X-Men: First Class, that feels contrived and tacked on but is pretty funny nonetheless. It sees James McAvoy's Charles Xavier and Michael Fassbender's proto-Magneto walking into a bar in an attempt to recruit Hugh Jackman's Wolverine to their cause. Jackman's cameo drew gasps from the audience at the screening I attended, as though Elvis or Michael Jackson had just walked into the room. This made me think: there's never been a great movie starring Wolverine, or even a movie in which Jackman as Wolverine has been all that great, yet somehow the Australian actor's portrayal of the adamantine-clawed hero has become iconic.

There are those who see Bryan Singer's X-Men films as the spark which ignited the fad for treating comic book stories with reverence. »

- Ben Child

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Greatest Horror Comedies

30 October 2011 7:14 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

 

The latest list in sound of sights month long look at the greatest horror films ever is taking a different look on the horror genre. There is a very narrow line that divides finding something funny and scary, which is exactly the sort of film this list is celebrating. As a genre there is two ways you can address the comedy horror. The first and the much more popular route is comedy about horror, these films rarely attempt to attain any qualities other than a comedic jibe at the genre. If you were to pick one classic example it would be Young Frankenstein – a film that satirises early horror and Frankenstein in what is close to comedy perfection (the Gene Wilder effect). The contemporary take on the genre has given the world some of the worst films of recent times in the Scary Movie franchise and its brood of mutant off-shoots. »

- Robert Simpson

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Is Bradley Cooper "The Man From U.N.C.L.E." ?

21 October 2011 4:13 AM, PDT | SneakPeek | See recent SneakPeek news »

According to reports, Warner Bros. and actor Bradley Cooper ("The Hangover") are in talks for Cooper to star as secret agent 'Napoloeon Solo' in Oscar-winning director Steven Soderbergh's upoming big screen adaptation of the 1960's NBC TV spy series, "The Man From U.N.C.L.E.".

The new film will be produced by David Dobkin, Jeffrey Kleeman and John Davis, based on a screenplay by Scott Z. Burns ("The Informant").

The original NBC TV series, airing September 1964 to January 1968, followed the exploits of two secret agents, played by actors Robert Vaughn ("The Magnificent Seven") and David McCallum ("The Great Escape") , who work for the clandestine, international law-enforcement agency 'U.N.C.L.E.' ('United Network Command for Law and Enforcement').

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer produced 105 "U.N.C.L.E." episodes, originally developed by Sam Rolfe for executive producer Norman Felton, with"James Bond" author Ian Fleming contributing characters 'Napoleon Solo' and 'April Dancer', »

- Michael Stevens

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Who Is The "Man From "U.N.C.L.E." ?

11 October 2011 9:45 AM, PDT | SneakPeek | See recent SneakPeek news »

Oscar-winner Steven Soderbergh ("Ocean's 11") is looking for a lead actor to replace unavailable George Clooney as the new "Man From "U.N.C.L.E." in Warners upcoming feature adaptation of the 1960's TV series "The Man From U.N.C.L.E.", based on a screenplay written by Scott Z. Burns ("The Informant") for producers John Davis and Jeff Kleeman.

The original NBC TV series, airing September 1964 to January 1968, followed the exploits of two secret agents, played by actors Robert Vaughn ("The Magnificent Seven") and David McCallum ("The Great Escape") , who work for the clandestine, international law-enforcement agency 'U.N.C.L.E.' ('United Network Command for Law and Enforcement').

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer produced 105 "U.N.C.L.E." episodes, originally developed by Sam Rolfe for executive producer Norman Felton, with "James Bond" author Ian Fleming contributing characters 'Napoleon Solo' and 'April Dancer', to series scriptwriters Robert Towne ("Chinatown") and Harlan Ellison ("The »

- Michael Stevens

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Chinatown Scribe Robert Towne To Write The Battle Of Britain

5 October 2011 8:55 PM, PDT | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

Robert Towne arguably wrote one of the greatest scripts of all time when he crafted Chinatown. The Writers Guild Of America ranks it behind only Casablanca and The Godfather and Towne took home the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay, beating out The Conversation, Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore, Day For Night and Harry and Tonto. The writer, who is now 77 years old, continues to work to this day and has now been hired to write a film about one of the most important events of World War II. Deadline has learned that Gk Films, the production company owned by Graham King, has hired Towne to script The Battle Of Britain. Taking place in 1940, the aerial battle saw Royal Air Force going up against the German Luftwaffe over the city of London. In their efforts the British pilots prevented the Nazi invasion of England. In addition to Chinatown, Towne directed four »

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'Chinatown' Scribe Robert Towne To Pen 'The Battle Of Britain'

5 October 2011 11:32 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Robert Towne needs no introduction. The writer behind "Chinatown," "The Last Detail," "The Rock" and more is considered the master among screenwriters, and there are few other names on a script that bring as much reverence. So who better to pair up with a movie about one of the most famous fights of World War II? The folks over at Gk Films know a good idea when they see one, and they've tasked Towne to pen "The Battle Of The Britain." If you slept through history class, the massive air battle in the summer of 1940 was one of the… »

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A Sound That Will Last Forever

4 October 2011 9:41 PM, PDT | Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy | See recent Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy news »

Film music buffs cite Jerry Goldsmith’s score for Chinatown as one of the all-time best, but relatively few people know who played the memorably moody trumpet lead. It was the same man you hear on the soundtrack of An American in Paris and countless other MGM musicals. Uan Rasey died last week at the age of 90, and I feel lucky that I got to interview him several years ago for my newsletter Leonard Maltin’s Movie Crazy. Uan Rasey at home in 2007. After that conversation, I ran into Uan many times at local jazz clubs, where he cheered on… »

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