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Chinatown (1974) More at IMDbPro »


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

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Curtis Hanson Rip: 1945-2016

21 September 2016 11:52 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

Curtis Hanson--Confidentially

By

Alex Simon

Curtis Hanson was my first interview with a fellow film buff and film journalist. He was nice enough to sit down with me twice, first at the Rose Cafe in Venice, then at a lunch spot in the Marina, the name of which has been lost to time. He was then kind enough to invite me to the world premiere of "L.A. Confidential" at the Chinese Theater as his guest, my first time on the red carpet at a real-life Hollywood premiere, and called me after this piece ran to thank me personally. A nice man. Hanson, and co-writer Brian Helgeland, would go on to win Best Adapted Screenplay Oscars for "L.A. Confidential."

Years later, I ran into Hanson at a book signing party for Pat York that was held in Westwood. I approached him and reminded him of our interview a decade or so earlier. »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Faye Dunaway, 75, Opens Up about Movies, Men, and the Problem with Mommie Dearest

2 September 2016 9:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

She created some of Hollywood's most memorable roles in such revolutionary films as Bonnie and Clyde, Chinatown and Network while simultaneously seducing a generation, but Faye Dunaway never thought she was beautiful as a young girl growing up in Bascom, Florida. When she first saw herself in the early dailies of Bonnie and Clyde in 1967, she couldn't look at the screen. "Just to see the face, to see that it's too round - but it was more than that," she says. "I didn't think my face was beautiful. I guess I found a lot wrong with it." And what about her remarkable cheekbones? »

- Liz McNeil and Kara Warner

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Faye Dunaway, 75, Opens Up about Movies, Men, and the Problem with Mommie Dearest

2 September 2016 9:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

She created some of Hollywood's most memorable roles in such revolutionary films as Bonnie and Clyde, Chinatown and Network while simultaneously seducing a generation, but Faye Dunaway never thought she was beautiful as a young girl growing up in Bascom, Florida. When she first saw herself in the early dailies of Bonnie and Clyde in 1967, she couldn't look at the screen. "Just to see the face, to see that it's too round - but it was more than that," she says. "I didn't think my face was beautiful. I guess I found a lot wrong with it." And what about her remarkable cheekbones? »

- Liz McNeil and Kara Warner

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‘The Birth of A Nation’: What Fox Searchlight Faces As It Plows Forward With A Tainted Oscar Frontrunner

18 August 2016 11:37 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

As Sundance moments go, the reception for “The Birth of a Nation” was unheard of. The audience gave writer-director-actor Nate Parker a standing ovation before the film began. Now his movie is facing another kind of reception, also unheard of: He must promote the movie while being shadowed by his 1999 rape trial, and news that the accuser committed suicide in 2012.

There are no real precedents for Parker’s situation.

Read More: Nate Parker Writes ‘Devastated’ Facebook Response to College Rape Trial and Accuser’s Suicide

Fox Searchlight executives are presenting a united front. Here’s their official statement: “Searchlight is aware of the incident that occurred while Nate Parker was at Penn State. We also know that he was found innocent and cleared of all charges. We stand behind Nate and are proud to help bring this important and powerful story to the screen.”

Inside the company, they’re not abandoning hope of an Oscar. »

- Anne Thompson

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‘The Birth of A Nation’: What Fox Searchlight Faces As It Plows Forward With A Tainted Oscar Frontrunner

18 August 2016 11:37 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

As Sundance moments go, the reception for “The Birth of a Nation” was unheard of. The audience gave writer-director-actor Nate Parker a standing ovation before the film began. Now his movie is facing another kind of reception, also unheard of: He must promote the movie while being shadowed by his 1999 rape trial, and news that the accuser committed suicide in 2012.

There are no real precedents for Parker’s situation.

Read More: Nate Parker Writes ‘Devastated’ Facebook Response to College Rape Trial and Accuser’s Suicide

Fox Searchlight executives are presenting a united front. Here’s their official statement: “Searchlight is aware of the incident that occurred while Nate Parker was at Penn State. We also know that he was found innocent and cleared of all charges. We stand behind Nate and are proud to help bring this important and powerful story to the screen.”

Inside the company, they’re not abandoning hope of an Oscar. »

- Anne Thompson

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The Most Dysfunctional Families in Cinema

11 August 2016 10:43 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

The dysfunctional family has been an ever-present image in popular culture for decades: the battling husband and wife flanked by their bratty children are perhaps most frequently employed on garishly trite television sitcoms. In the movies, the gloves are ripped away and the reality shines on what is more often than not left unexposed in the darkness. What’s revealed seems to irrefutably prove that Tolstoy was absolutely correct when he wrote: “All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.”

Now playing in select theaters is Little Men, the newest film from director Ira Sachs, with whom we recently spoke to about its making. The plot follows two teenage boys in Brooklyn, NY who develop a budding friendship, despite the feuding of their parents over the lease of a local dress shop. The film is already receiving raves from critics, including our own review »

- Tony Hinds

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Music That Takes Us Beyond: A Guide to the Star Trek Movie Soundtracks

22 July 2016 4:00 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

To mark composer Michael Giacchino’s triumphant return with Star Trek Beyond, Sean Wilson explores the extraordinarily rich legacy of music from the Star Trek movies…

From being initially written off on the basis of the underwhelming trailers to its emergence as a funny, fast-paced and fan-pleasing summer blockbuster, Star Trek Beyond has according to most critics done a bang up job of both honouring and continuing the classic franchise on the eve of its 50th anniversary.

Key to its impact is yet another rousingly adventurous and rich score from Michael Giacchino, whose return to the Trek realm for the third time was launched with a spectacular live concert performance at the movie’s premiere in Los Angeles. But then music has always been one of the most important and powerful weapons in the Star Trek arsenal, several of Hollywood’s most legendary composers having beamed us into the unknown. »

- Sean Wilson

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Roman Polanski & Olivier Assayas To Adapt The Novel ‘Based on a True Story’

18 July 2016 2:59 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Though director Roman Polanski’s next film was set to tackle the Dreyfus affair, the 1890s French political scandal involving a Captain of the French Army who was convicted of passing secrets to the Germans, it has so far failed to get off the ground. But now The Film Stage reports that Polanski will adapt Delphine de Vigan’s novel “Based on a True Story,” with a script from writer-director Olivier Assayas. The novel tells the story of a writer who goes through a rough time after the release of their latest book, and their relationship with an admirer who tries to impose influence on the writer.

Read More: Roman Polanski Will Not Be Extradited to U.S.

Polanski is best known for his numerous acclaimed films during his five-decade career. Some of these include “Knife in the Water,” “Repulsion,” “Cul-de-Sac,” “Rosemary’s Baby,” “Macbeth,” “Chinatown,” and “The Pianist.” His »

- Vikram Murthi

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39 Things We Learned from Robert Towne’s and David Fincher’s Chinatown Commentary

13 July 2016 10:21 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

“They did this in one take, which I hate.”

David Fincher loves Chinatown.

Of course, anyone who appreciates brilliant filmmaking should feel the same way, especially if they also appreciate themes of human nature drenched in cynicism. The film is easily one of the smartest, most beautiful gut-punches to come out of Hollywood in the ’70s (or any other decade for that matter), and it remains a powerful commentary on greed, bureaucracy, and the futility of good intentions.

Fincher sat down with Robert Towne, the film’s writer, for a commentary, and it makes for a fascinating look at a classic film.

Keep reading to see what I heard on the commentary for Roman Polanski’s Chinatown.

https://medium.com/media/885c1e98ecd68619e111417b944466a1/hrefChinatown (1974)

Commentator: Robert Towne (writer), David Fincher (fan)

1. Fincher loves how sinister the black & white logo looks as it suggests something monstrous like King Kong, but »

- Rob Hunter

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Do sequels ever really work when decades have passed since the first film?

27 June 2016 3:15 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

I still haven’t seen Independence Day: Resurgence, and there’s a good chance I won’t. When 20th Century Fox made the decision not to screen the film for Us press in advance of the film’s opening, they sent a very clear message to anyone paying attention, and it’s a message that I believe more and more studios would love to send to critics, especially on their giant event films: not only do we not need you, but we don’t want you. At all. And it’s true. Studios don’t really need to screen movies for critics. It’s a professional agreement that we all participate in, but more and more often, studios screen later and almost begrudgingly. I am amazed how many times this year alone I’ve had to basically beg to even find out when or if a screening is happening. The »

- Drew McWeeny

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‘The Saint’ Movie Reboot in the Works at Paramount

17 June 2016 2:32 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Paramount is developing a movie reboot of “The Saint,” two decades after Val Kilmer’s thriller and 50 years after Roger Moore’s TV series.

The studio has secured a deal for book series rights and is closing producing deals with Lorenzo di Bonaventura, Brad Krevoy and Robert Evans with the goal of starting an action franchise.

The Saint” is based on Leslie Charteris’ book series, which follow the debonair Simon Templar character first introduced in the 1928 novel “Meet the Tiger,” followed by “Enter the Saint” in 1930. Templar stole from corrupt politicians and warmongers, leaving a calling card of a stick figure with a halo.

George Sanders starred in half a dozen films as “The Saint” in the late 1930s and early 1940s. Prior to his days portraying James Bond, Moore starred in a popular long-running British TV series during the 1960s.

The 1997 movie starred Kilmer and Elisabeth Shue, and was »

- Dave McNary

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15 Things We Learned From the 'De Palma' Documentary

9 June 2016 8:59 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

The setup to De Palma, Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow's engrossing new documentary about the life and career of controversial filmmaker Brian De Palma (opening in theaters on June 10th), couldn't be simpler: The 75-year-old director dissects most of his films and shares analyses and behind-the-scenes anecdotes in between clips. Forget talking-head testimonials from collaborators, flashy visuals or dramatic reenactments. You just get the man himself, looking back and holding court in all his verbose, insightful glory.

And that is more than enough. Known primarily for his obsession with voyeurism, »

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Out of the Past: The Greatest 1970s Detective Movies

20 May 2016 12:26 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Whether they’re peeping on cheating husbands or reeling in runaway daughters, the cinematic detective, popularized in the ’30s and ’40s, can always be relied upon for a witty line or a sock in the jaw. Often, the detective is a man alone, searching through dark alleys for invaluable clues to some labyrinthine mystery. The detective is often the only soul who will do whatever it takes, no matter how hopeless the circumstances may seem. As Raymond Chandler wrote: “Down these mean streets a man must go who is not himself mean.” In the ’70s, the culture irrevocably changed, but the detective’s job stayed the same — if not perhaps a bit more complex.

The Nice Guys, the newest film from Kiss Kiss Bang Bang writer-director Shane Black, is out in theaters this week. In the film, a luckless private eye and a grumpy hired thug find themselves an unlikely »

- Tony Hinds

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Review: Shane Black's 'The Nice Guys' is a raw, rough, rowdy delight

19 May 2016 2:00 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Shockingly, this is not a Christmas movie. In every other way, though, it is a Shane Black movie, and that is reason enough to rejoice. I am more than willing to cop to the fact that part of what I like about Shane Black is that he evidently loves the exact same things I love, and for the exact same reasons. When someone’s making art that hews so closely to my ideal aesthetic, I start half-in-the-bag for the thing. I’ve written often about my love of La detective stories, especially when set in different eras of the city’s development. Walter Mosley, Raymond Chandler, Thomas Pynchon, Robert Towne, James Ellroy, Michael Connelly… lots of guys have mined this territory to terrific effect, and I have no doubt I’ll take my own shot at it someday. What Black does here is very different than what Paul Thomas Anderson did in Inherent Vice, »

- Drew McWeeny

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Comic Book Announcement: NBA All-star Kareem Abdul-jabbar Brings His Unique Mycroft Holmes To Comics!

18 May 2016 9:11 AM, PDT | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

This August, Titan Comics is thrilled to team with NBA All-star and Polymath legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar for Mycroft Holmes and the Apocalypse Handbook: a brand new standalone comic book adventure that uncovers the secrets of the elder Holmes brother.

Kareem’s passion for the character is evident, having already written a novel based around Mycroft. His Mycroft Holmes novel published in September 2015 to critical applause. Described by Academy Award winning screenwriter Robert Towne (Chinatown) as “beautifully written and full of intrigue,” the novel garnered high profile media attention around the globe with pieces appearing in Entertainment Weekly, Time Magazine, The Guardianand The London Times, and many more. Covering the announcement, The New York Times noted Abdul-Jabbar’s numerous credits even “rival [that of] Conan Doyle himself.”

An all-new adventure, The Apocalypse Handbook sees the diffident, brilliant Mycroft pulled into a globe-spanning adventure at the behest of Queen Victoria and a secret organization »

- Michael Connally

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The 80 Best-Directed Films, According to the Directors Guild of America

3 May 2016 6:59 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With editors and cinematographers chiming in on the best examples of their craft in cinema history, it’s now time for directors to have a say. To celebrate the 80th anniversary of the Directors Guild of America, they’ve conducted a poll for their members when it comes to the 80 greatest directorial achievements in feature films since the organization’s founding in 1936. With 2,189 members participating, the top pick went to Francis Ford Coppola for The Godfather, one of three films from the director making the top 10.

Even with films from nonmembers being eligible, the male-dominated, America-centric choices are a bit shameful (Kathryn Bigelow is the only female director on the list, and the first foreign film doesn’t show up until number 26), but not necessarily surprising when one looks at the make-up of its membership. As with any list, there’s bound to be disagreements (Birdman besting The Bicycle Thief, »

- Jordan Raup

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Candy

2 May 2016 9:03 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

The dirty book of the '60s became an all-star dirty movie with Brando, Burton, Starr, Coburn, Matthau, Astin, Aznavour and Huston all wanting a taste of the Swedish nymphet Ewa Aulin. Camerawork by Rotunno, designs by Dean Tavoularis, effects by Doug Trumbull -- and the best material is Marlon Brando making goofy faces as a sub-Sellers Indian guru. Candy Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1968 / Color / 1:78 widescreen / 124 min. /Candy e il suo pazzo mondo / Street Date May 17, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Ewa Aulin, Charles Aznavour, Marlon Brando, James Coburn, Richard Burton, John Astin, John Huston, Walter Matthau, Ringo Starr, Anita Pallenberg, Elsa Martinelli. Cinematography Giuseppe Rotunno Production Designer Dean Tavoularis Opening and closing designed by Douglas Trumbull Film Editor Giancarlo Cappelli, Frank Santillo Original Music Dave Grusin Writing credits Buck Henry from the book by Terry Southern and Mason Hoffenberg Produced by Robert Haggiag Directed by Christian Marquand

Reviewed »

- Glenn Erickson

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Tcmff Presents Faye Dunaway & Network

2 May 2016 10:00 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Anne Marie here, reporting with a 30 share on Hollywood Blvd!

The 7th Annual TCM Film Fest ended on a high note this year with Network. Though a satire about network television may not seem like the first choice for a film festival sponsored by a teleivion network, nonetheless TCM rolled out the red carpet, not only for the movie, but also for Faye Dunaway. The Academy Award-winning legend introduced the movie by talking to TCM host Ben Mankiewicz about the work - her process, her co-workers, and her thoughts on television and film.

Dunaway started by describing just how many people told her not to take the role of Diane Christensen in Network. Hot off the success of Bonnie & Clyde and Chinatown, Dunaway had awards goodwill to burn. Even Network director Sideney Lumet told her not to take the role. However, Faye Dunaway went against Lumet's good advice, and starred in Network regardless. »

- Anne Marie

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BFI Review – Macbeth (1971)

19 April 2016 4:10 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Macbeth, 1971.

Directed by Roman Polanski.

Starring Jon Finch, Martin Shaw, Nicholas Selby, Francesca Annis and Terence Bayler.

Synopsis:

Macbeth craves, and kills, for the role of King but his demons haunt him as he slowly loses his mind…

After last year’s vivid depiction of Macbeth, starring Michael Fassbender, it is worth turning back the clocks to watch Roman Polanski’s 1971 interpretation. Both approach the text with the same 11th Century period setting and they sprawl across vast locations that only cinema can truly exploit. Setting the scene in the muddy Highlands of Scotland, the director of Chinatown directs a gory, explicit version of Macbeth. As the film closes by returning to the witch’s cave you wonder if, in the opening scenes, Banquo could’ve saved a lot of hassle and told Macbeth, “Forget it Mac, it’s Witchin’ town”.

Macbeth, of course, could never forget the sisters’ sinister predictions of power and riches. »

- Simon Columb

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Happy 90th Birthday to Roger Corman – Here Are His Ten Best Films

5 April 2016 11:15 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

Happy 9oth Birthday to a legend! Roger Corman has directed more than 50 low-budget drive-in classics, produced and/or distributed 450 more, and helped the careers of hundreds of young people breaking into the industry. A partial list: Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola, Irvin Kershner, Monte Hellman, Peter Bogdanovich, Gail Ann Hurd, James Cameron, Jonathan Kaplan, Joe Dante, Robert Towne. Considering Corman’s own films, Jonathan Demme has stated. “Roger is arguably the greatest independent filmmaker the American film industry has seen and probably ever will see.” And he’s still going strong, currently producing the upcoming actioner Death Race 2050. We Are Movie Geeks has taken a look at Corman’s career and here are what we think are the ten best films that he has directed:

 

Honorable Mention. The Premature Burial

The Premature Burial (1962) is the ‘odd man out’ among the »

- Movie Geeks

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 28 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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