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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 24 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Roman Polanski Talks His Life and Career, ‘Venus in Fur’ and Retirement

9 April 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Roman Polanski revels in recounting the story of how he met his wife, actress Emmanuelle Seigner, to whom he has been married for 25 years, and who is the mother of his two children. The year was 1985, and Polanski was in pre-production on “Pirates,” the problem-plagued, big-budget adventure comedy that remains the greatest critical and commercial failure of his career. With his casting director, Dominique Besnehard, he planned to attend a Paris drag cabaret in search of a female impersonator to play a role in the film. Besnehard asked if he could bring along a young French model who had recently filmed a small part in Jean-Luc Godard’s “Detective” but claimed to have no interest in an acting career. Polanski instantly replied, “Bring her.” The model turned out to be Seigner.

“That was the best casting of his entire career,” Polanski says with a laugh. “It’s funny that I »

- Scott Foundas

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Matthew Weiner and the End of 'Mad Men'

8 April 2014 12:30 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

By the time Mad Men ends next year – the final season, which debuts on Sunday April 13th on AMC, will be split into two Breaking Bad-style runs – there will have been 92 episodes of unmatched TV, covering the entirety of the 1960s. Though the series has focused on an advertising agency and the people who work there, according to Mad Men creator Matthew Weiner, the show has always been more about the lessons of that era, from the British Invasion through the crashing of the counterculture wave with the election of Richard Nixon. »

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Trailer for Roman Polanski's Venus in Fur is brimming with sexual tension

4 April 2014 9:43 AM, PDT | JoBlo.com | See recent JoBlo news »

Roman Polanski is a director I cannot quite figure out. I mean, the guy has directed everything from noir like Chinatown to horror like Rosemary's Baby with all sorts of distinct projects in between. His most recent film, Venus In Fur, adapts an award-winning play, much like his previous film, the excellent Carnage. Unlike Carnage, Venus In Fur is subtitled as the film was produced and performed in French. Starring Polanski's wife, Emmanuelle Seigner, and Quantum Of Solace's Mathieu »

- Alex Maidy

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Matthew Weiner Opens Doors for New Talent on ‘Mad Men’ Production Team

1 April 2014 9:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

It’s no secret that “Mad Men” launched the careers of most of its stars — Jon Hamm was best known for a recurring role on “Providence” before he slipped into Don Draper’s suits. Whether casting virtual unknowns like Christina Hendricks and Elisabeth Moss or giving vets like Harry Hamlin and Julia Ormond a chance to shine (and land Emmy noms), creator Matt Weiner clearly has an eye for talent.

That knack for casting extends behind the scenes. Weiner is proud of having given many writers and directors their first big breaks during the seven-season run of the AMC drama. “The final season is being directed almost entirely by people who had their first episode here,” he says while walking the halls at L.A. Center Studios.

Production teams on long-running shows often become like family to one another, given the hours and dedication it takes to produce a drama series. »

- Jenelle Riley

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Azazel Jacobs talks about Doll & Em

24 March 2014 3:35 PM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Doll & Em director Azazel Jacobs: "I'm interested in looking at humans and seeing how people are with each other" Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze After the premiere screening at New York's Museum of Modern Art of all six episodes of King Bee Productions and HBO's Doll & Em, starring Emily Mortimer and Dolly Wells, I met up with director Azazel Jacobs to talk about the spirit of place in Hollywood and how it allows him to communicate with Charlie Chaplin, on site with Roman Polanski's Chinatown, Joseph L Mankiewicz, Laurel and Hardy. He told me about the human growing from an idea and why tone triumphs over story.

We see Bradley Cooper stay on the red carpet, Jonathan Cake practice a pick-up line worthy of Hong Sang-soo, while ice cream determines master and servant.

Anne-Katrin Titze: The series producer Alessandro Nivola told me that the idea started with seeing Michael Winterbottom's The Trip. »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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The Definitive Original Screenplays: 10-1

16 March 2014 9:19 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The end of the road. The scripts that should be studied, dissected, and taught for their quality, their timeliness, and their impact on the film industry as a whole. Some were perfect for their time and place. Some were ahead of their time. Some defined their generation. And one still rules all, forty years after it was written.

courtesy of hollywood.com

10. Bonnie and Clyde (1967)

Written by David Newman, Robert Benton, and Robert Towne (uncredited)

You’re just like your brother. Ignorant, uneducated hillbilly, except the only special thing about you is your peculiar ideas about love-making, which is no love-making at all.

Nothing spices up a movie theater better than a little sex and violence; Arthur Penn’s 1967 film broke new ground on that front. Fictionalizing the partnership of famous gangsters Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, the film starred Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty as the title criminals, while »

- Joshua Gaul

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'True Detective' finale review: Truth, justice, and the satisfying surprise of a happy ending

10 March 2014 5:29 AM, PDT | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

Culminating a remarkable first season in fine, moving form, True Detective’s finale, titled “Form and Void,” took us to the heart of darkness at the vortex center of its weird fiction — as well as  the final stage of its meta-commentary on the stories we tell ourselves, about ourselves, for better and worse. It was a tale that ripped dark marks on our bellies, then soothed us by “making flowers” on us. So to speak.

We start on the outskirts of the infernal plane. We begin in hell on earth. The ersatz underworld of The Yellow King — a.k.a. »

- Jeff Jensen

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SXSW Film Review: ‘Wild Canaries’

10 March 2014 1:27 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Classic mystery conventions have provided fertile creative ground for any number of young American filmmakers in recent years, as evidenced by Rian Johnson’s “Brick,” Aaron Katz’s “Cold Weather” and now Lawrence Michael Levine’s “Wild Canaries.” Starring Levine and Sophia Takal (his wife and regular collaborator) as a sort of hipster Nick and Nora Charles investigating the shady goings-on around their Brooklyn apartment building, this craftily structured yet playfully loose-limbed detective yarn provides a canny narrative template for another of the writer-director’s low-budget studies of relational turmoil (following 2011′s “Gabi on the Roof in July”), its occasional descent into shrill bickering largely offset by the filmmakers’ palpable delight in their choice of material. Far too eventful, plot-driven and frankly fun to be classified as mumblecore, “Canaries” can only build on Levine’s audience; it could catch on with savvy indie filmgoers, particularly those with an affection for the genre being saluted. »

- Justin Chang

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Score a Copy of The Visitor on Blu-ray

4 March 2014 10:00 AM, PST | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

The strangeness that is The Visitor is now on Blu-ray, and we have your chance to score a copy on us! Believe us - you Need this film in your life. It's that damned wacky! Read on for details.

To enter for your chance to win, just send us an E-mail Here including your Full Name And Mailing Address. We’ll take care of the rest.

This contest will end at 12:01 Am on Wednesday, March 19, 2014.

Drafthouse Films, in conjunction with Cinedigm, is bringing the wildly ambitious and neglected sci-fi/horror epic The Visitor to Blu-ray and DVD Today, March 4 .

Synopsis

Incredibly ambitious but derided and largely neglected upon its initial release in 1979, The Visitor is an unforgettable assault on reality, a phantasmagoric sci-fi/horror/action hybrid. From writer-producer Ovidio G. Assonitis (Tentacles) and director/actor/body builder Michael J. Paradise (aka Giulio Paradisi - Fellini's 8½), the film artfully fuses »

- Uncle Creepy

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New on Video: ‘Tess’

28 February 2014 6:45 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Tess

Written by Gérard Brach, Roman Polanski, and John Brownjohn

Directed by Roman Polanski

France/UK, 1979

Roman Polanski revealed an exceptional eye for gripping visual design in his earliest films. In those works, like Knife in the Water, Cul-de-sac, Repulsion, Rosemary’s Baby and, somewhat later, The Tenant, most of this pictorial construction was derivative of themes, and subsequent depictions of, confinement, claustrophobic paranoia, and severely taut antagonism. In terms of visual and narrative scope, Chinatown opened things up somewhat, but it was with Tess, his 1979 adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s “Tess of the d’Urbervilles,” that Polanski significantly broadened his canvas to encompass the sweeping tale of the Victorian era loves and conflicts of this eponymous peasant girl.

Polanski speaks to this distinction during an interview in the newly released Criterion Collection Blu-ray/DVD of Tess. In discussing the film for the French TV program Cine regards, the director »

- Jeremy Carr

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'The Bag Man' Interview with Crispin Glover | Exclusive

27 February 2014 11:32 AM, PST | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

The Bag Man is a taut crime thriller that follows the story of Jack (John Cusack), a tough guy with chronic bad luck. Hired by legendary crime boss Dragna (Robert De Niro) to complete a simple but unusual task, the plot centers on Jack and a host of shady characters that have been summoned to a remote location for unknown reasons. Over the course of a long and violently eventful night awaiting this crime boss's arrival, Jack crosses paths with Rivka (Rebecca Da Costa), a stunningly beautiful woman whose life becomes physically and emotionally entangled with his own. When Dragna finally arrives on the scene there are sudden and extreme consequences for all.

Appearing in the film is one of our personal favorite actors, Crispin Glover. He plays the innkeeper at this mysterious location where a number of unsavory characters have gathered. The actor has been suspiciously absent from the »

- MovieWeb

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David O. Russell's Sight and Sound Poll Reveals Director's Key Influences (Clips)

17 February 2014 10:13 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Director David O. Russell has enjoyed a great two years back-to-back on the awards circuit, from last year's much-loved "Silver Linings Playbook" to 2014 Oscar heavyweight "American Hustle." As an actor's director who loves cinema, the following top ten list from Russell's Sight and Sound poll for the British Film Institute has few shockers. Take a look at the idiosyncratic list, and clips, below. The filmmaker has repeatedly tipped his hat to Polanski's "Chinatown" -- which he memorized 20 minutes of -- and Scorsese's "Goodfellas." You can feel the pulse of these films thrumming in all Russell's films, including "I Heart Huckabees," "The Fighter" and "Three Kings." He loves his '70s New Hollywood ("Chinatown," "Godfather," "Young Frankenstein") and feel-good classics ("It's a Wonderful Life") with a dash of arthouse for good measure ("Bourgeoisie"). "Blue Velvet" (1986) Dir. David Lynch "Chinatown" (1974) Dir. Roman Polanski "The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie" (1972) Dir. Luis »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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12 Years A Slave Screenwriter John Ridley Wins USC Libraries Scripter Award

9 February 2014 9:14 AM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Photo Credit: Ron Murray

Screenwriter John Ridley joined family members of nineteenth-century author Solomon Northup to receive the 26th-annual USC Libraries Scripter Award for “12 Years a Slave.” Selection committee co-chair Howard Rodman announced the winners at the black-tie event on Saturday, Feb. 8, at USC’s Doheny Memorial Library.

“Until I read Solomon’s memoir, I didn’t know what being a writer was all about,” Ridley said in his acceptance speech. “The way that Solomon wrote, the clarity with which he wrote, and more importantly, the strength of his character, what he went through without bitterness, without hate—that really taught me something.”

“12 Years a Slave’s” Scripter win adds to the growing number of awards for the Fox Searchlight film, including best motion picture in the drama category at last month’s Golden Globes. The film is nominated for nine Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Adapted Screenplay. »

- Michelle McCue

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Solomon Northup wins his first award of the year for '12 Years a Slave' at USC Scripter Awards

8 February 2014 11:52 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

The USC Scripter Awards are one of my favorite events of the film awards season. Yes, they are unique in that they recognize the authors of both screenplays and source material, and can often present a unique slate of honorees, but it's also a lovely personal excursion when I can make it, as the echoes of my days toiling away on various papers and thesis efforts in the halls of the Doheny Library make it an annual homecoming for me. This year's 26th annual ceremony made for a wonderful evening as not only was the master himself, "Chinatown" screenwriter Robert Towne, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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The Visitor and Ms. 45 Blu-ray / DVD Release Details & Cover Art

7 February 2014 3:51 PM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Drafthouse Films has announced that they will be releasing both The Visitor and Ms. 45 to Blu-ray & DVD in March:

“Drafthouse Films, in conjunction with Cinedigm (Nasdaq: Cidm), will bring two of its recent theatrical success stories to Blu-ray and DVD in restored and remastered editions: the wildly ambitious and neglected sci-fi/horror epic The Visitor and Ms. 45, legendary director Abel Ferrara’s gritty, gore-filled New York revenge thriller. The films will arrive, respectively, on March 4 and on March 25, 2014, with SRPs of $29.95 for Blu-ray and $27.95 for DVD. They come packed with bonus material in both formats.

Incredibly ambitious but derided and largely neglected upon its initial release in 1979, The Visitor is an unforgettable assault on reality, a phantasmagoric sci-fi/horror/action hybrid. From writer-producer Ovidio G. Assonitis (Tentacles) and director/actor/body builder Michael J. Paradise (aka Giulio Paradisi – Fellini’s 8½),the film artfully fuses elements of some of »

- Jonathan James

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Drafthouse Films Bringing The Visitor and Ms. 45 to Home Video

7 February 2014 3:12 PM, PST | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

The lovable loonies at Drafthouse Films are doing a great job of bringing some really obscure little titles to a new generation of viewers. Next up for them - the DVD and Blu-ray releases of The Visitor and Ms. 45. Read on for details.

From the Press Release

Drafthouse Films, in conjunction with Cinedigm (Nasdaq: Cidm), will bring two of its recent theatrical success stories to Blu-ray and DVD in restored and remastered editions: the wildly ambitious and neglected sci-fi/horror epic The Visitor and Ms. 45, legendary director Abel Ferrara's gritty, gore-filled New York revenge thriller. The films will arrive, respectively, on March 4 and on March 25, 2014, with SRPs of $29.95 for Blu-ray and $27.95 for DVD. They come packed with bonus material in both formats.

Incredibly ambitious but derided and largely neglected upon its initial release in 1979, The Visitor is an unforgettable assault on reality, a phantasmagoric sci-fi/horror/action hybrid. »

- Uncle Creepy

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‘Tequila Sunrise’ is a sexy, luscious trip down memory lane of great 1980s filmmaking

7 February 2014 12:00 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Tequila Sunrise

Written and directed by Robert Towne

USA, 1988

Dale ‘Mac’ McKussic (Mel Gibson) and Nick Ferscia (Kurt Russell) are longtime friends who know each other inside out. Even their diametrically opposed career paths have failed to create too strong a rift in their friendship, although certain tensions have risen. As it turns out, Mac is a drug dealer, a handyman gifted in assisting narcotics suppliers in their clandestine operations. Nick is a lieutenant detective specializing in breaking such cases wide open. When the film opens, Nick, currently on assignment and undercover, stumbles onto Mac as the latter gives training to his lawyer, who wants in on the potential dividends reaped from drug dealing. In a moment of privacy, Mac explains he was only acting as a guide for his newbie lawyer-dealer and has retired from the business, a claim Nick is quick to scoff at. When word gets out »

- Edgar Chaput

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Legend Robert Evans Developing TV Series About ’70s Hollywood

29 January 2014 8:41 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Robert Evans, legendary '70s studio kingpin and America's Orangest Man, has seen some things in his time. In between producing “The Godfather,” “Chinatown,” “Rosemary's Baby,” “The Italian Job,” “The Conversation” and many others, Evans has found time to get married seven times, get convicted for dealing cocaine, plead the Fifth on his alleged acquaintance with a hitman, and write a bestselling memoir, “The Kid Stays In The Picture,” which is sort of like “Easy Riders, Raging Bulls” if it had been rewritten as gonzo autobiography. Naturally, one man doesn't do all this without becoming a Hollywood legend—Evans is the basis for numerous knowing spoofs, including Dustin Hoffman's character in “Wag the Dog” and Martin Landau's on “Entourage” (and even a cynical studio boss in Orson Welles' unreleased “The Other Side of the Wind”). And naturally, a man as canny as Robert Evans doesn't become a »

- Ben Brock

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Legend Robert Evans Developing TV Series About ’70s Hollywood

29 January 2014 8:41 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Robert Evans, legendary '70s studio kingpin and America's Orangest Man, has seen some things in his time. In between producing “The Godfather,” “Chinatown,” “Rosemary's Baby,” “The Italian Job,” “The Conversation” and many others, Evans has found time to get married seven times, get convicted for dealing cocaine, plead the Fifth on his alleged acquaintance with a hitman, and write a bestselling memoir, “The Kid Stays In The Picture,” which is sort of like “Easy Riders, Raging Bulls” if it had been rewritten as gonzo autobiography. Naturally, one man doesn't do all this without becoming a Hollywood legend—Evans is the basis for numerous knowing spoofs, including Dustin Hoffman's character in “Wag the Dog” and Martin Landau's on “Entourage” (and even a cynical studio boss in Orson Welles' unreleased “The Other Side of the Wind”). And naturally, a man as canny as Robert Evans doesn't become a »

- Ben Brock

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First Images: Crispin Glover’s New Directorial Film

24 January 2014 12:10 PM, PST | Underground Film Journal | See recent Underground Film Journal news »

Cult movie director Crispin Glover has released the first three images promoting his latest directorial effort, which as of this writing remains nameless. All three images can be viewed in the gallery below.

In addition, Glover will be previewing 10 minutes from the film in Chicago, Illinois on January 31 at the Music Box Theater at a screening of his second directorial effort, It Is Fine! Everything Is Fine.

This latest movie will complete Glover’s “It” trilogy of films that began with What Is It?, which was completed around 2005. The film will also mark the first time that Crispin has ever acted on-screen with his father Bruce Glover, an actor who has appeared in diverse films such as Chinatown, Diamonds Are Forever and Ghost World.

Crispin is notoriously protective of the films he has directed, choosing to show them publicly only at screenings at which he can make a personal appearance. »

- Mike Everleth

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 24 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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