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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 29 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


The 57 Greatest Westerns Ever, Ranked

5 hours ago | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

It's fitting that Clint Eastwood and John Wayne both have the same birthday week. (Wayne, who died in 1979, was born May 26, 1907, while Eastwood turns 85 on May 31). After all, these two all-American actors' careers span the history of that most American of movie genres, the western.

Both iconic actors were top box office draws for decades, both seldom stretched from their familiar personas, and both played macho, conservative cowboy heroes who let their firearms do most of the talking. Each represented one of two very different strains of western, the traditional and the revisionist.

As a birthday present to Hollywood's biggest heroes of the Wild West, here are the top 57 westerns you need to see.

57. 'Meek's Cutoff' (2010)

Indie filmmaker Kelly Reichardt and her frequent leading lady, Michelle Williams, are the talents behind this sparse, docudrama about an 1845 wagon train whose Oregon Trail journey goes horribly awry. It's an intense »

- Gary Susman

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Brad Bird interview: Tomorrowland, Star Wars, surprises

19 May 2015 2:45 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Tomorrowland, Chinatown, Die Hard and keeping films a secret are on the agenda as we chat to director Brad Bird...

This article contains a big spoiler for Chinatown.

Ah, the mighty Brad Bird. If he'd downed tools after he made the peerless The Iron Giant and never made another film again, we'd still be sending him Christmas cards every year. But then he went and made The Incredibles, Ratatouille and Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol as well. Gah. Now we have to send chocolates as well.

Bird's latest film, Tomorrowland, arrives in cinemas this week, and we caught up with him to find out more about it. Here's how the chat went...

If we boil down the movies that many of us grew up loving in the 1980s, there's relatable stakes at the heart of them. So, for instance, Back To The Future is at its centre someone trying to get his parents back together. »

- simonbrew

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‘Sicario’ Cannes Review: Brutal Benicio del Toro Thriller Takes No Prisoners

19 May 2015 2:21 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Ever since Joe Mantell uttered the immortal words, “Forget it, Jake. It’s Chinatown” to Jack Nicholson at the end of that Roman Polanski movie in 1972, that line has been a touchstone for summing up how some situations are just too corrupt, too screwed up to comprehend, much less remedy. A variation on the line popped up in Pete Docter’s great animated film “Inside Out” at the Cannes Film Festival this weekend, and now Canadian director Denis Villeneuve has made a feature-length exploration of the drug trade, in which the entire movie pretty much says to Emily Blunt‘s character, »

- Steve Pond

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Nantucket Film Festival to Honor 'Chinatown' Screenwriter Robert Towne, More Awards and Panels Announced

14 May 2015 8:19 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: Attention, Filmmakers: Nantucket Film Festival Screenplay Competition Final Deadlines Closing In The Nantucket Film Festival has announced screenwriter Robert Towne as the recipient of the 2015 Screenwriters' Tribute. Town is best known for the Academy Award-winning script for "Chinatown," as well as "Shampoo," "Mission: Impossible" and uncredited work on "The Godfather" and "Bonnie and Clyde." "In our 20th anniversary year we could not be more thrilled to honor the incomparable Robert Towne, said Mystelle Brabbée, Executive Director of the Nantucket Film Festival. "As a festival that recognizes achievements in screenwriting, Towne's body of work has truly changed the landscape of American cinema." The festival will also honor Liz Garbus, director of "What Happened, Miss Simone?" with the Special Achievement in Documentary Storytelling Award, and Leslye Headland, writer-director of »

- Casey Cipriani

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Robert Towne to Receive Screenwriters Tribute at 2015 Nantucket Film Festival

14 May 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Screenwriter Robert Towne will be honored at the Nantucket Film Festival’s 2015 Screenwriters Tribute, the festival announced Thursday.

Best known for “Chinatown,” Towne also penned “Shampoo,” “The Last Detail” and “Mission: Impossible.” Past honorees of the tribute include Aaron Sorkin, Nancy Meyers, Charlie Kaufman and Alexander Payne.

“In our 20th anniversary year we could not be more thrilled to honor the incomparable Robert Towne,” Nff executive director Mystelle Brabbee said in a statement. “As a festival that recognizes achievements in screenwriting, Towne’s body of work has truly changed the landscape of American cinema.”

Towne will also engage in an public conversation with Chris Matthews (MSNBC’s “Hardball”) as part of the festival’s “In Their Shoes…” series. The festivities will be hosted by comedian David Steinberg. Epix will present the event.

In addition to Towne, the evening will also celebrate screenwriters Liz Garbus and Leslye Headland. Garbus’ “What Happened, »

- Marianne Zumberge

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Why 1974 was the best year in film history

29 April 2015 11:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century.  Click here for a complete list of our essays. I was one of the first to select years for this particular exercise, which probably allowed me to select the correct year. The answer is, of course, 1974 and all other answers are wrong. No matter what your criteria happens to be, 1974 is going to come out on top. Again, this is not ambiguous or open to debate. We have to start, of course, with the best of the best. "Chinatown" is one of the greatest movies ever made. You can't structure a thriller better than Robert Towne and Roman Polanski do, nor shoot a Los Angeles movie better than John Alonzo has done. Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway give the best performances of their careers, which is no small achievement. If you ask »

- Daniel Fienberg

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Name Composers Not Above Getting the Boot

29 April 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

There was a brief stir in January when composer Harry Gregson-Williams publicly expressed, via Facebook, his surprise at hearing music he didn’t recognize at the premiere of Michael Mann’s thriller “Blackhat” — and at not hearing a lot of score he did write.

The composer says his Facebook post has been blown out of proportion, but admits it was disappointing to see music he toiled over dropped (or replaced) in the final cut. But, he stresses, that’s just part of the game.

“You win some, you lose some,” he says, relaying his early mentor Hans Zimmer’s comment that you haven’t made it as a film composer until you’ve had a score rejected.

Gregson-Williams is simply the latest in a long line of composers who’ve watched scores tossed out and replaced whole-cloth, partially substituted by pre-existing tracks, or mangled beyond recognition. Mann is notorious for »

- Tim Greiving

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25 underrated 1990s movie soundtracks

28 April 2015 3:02 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

From Muppet Treasure Island to Speed, we take a look at the 90s soundtracks that deserve another listen...

Ah, the 1990s. The decade that brought us The Lion King. Titanic. Quentin Tarantino. That wordless bathroom scene in Baz Luhrmann's Romeo + Juliet. Angelo Badalamenti's Twin Peaks. Duel of the Fates from Star Wars: The Phantom Menace. In the Mood for Love.

It was a good 10 years for film music, no doubt.

But scratch the surface of 1991 through 1999 and there are tons of good scores ready to spring a surprise on your ears. Some were attached to sorely underrated movies, others were overshadowed by wildly successful ones, and some have simply been forgotten in the passage of time.

Here, in no particular order, are the top 25 underappreciated film soundtracks from the 1990s.

1. Chaplin - John Barry

Okay, let's start with a big one. Richard Attenborough. Robert Downey Jr. John Barry. »

- simonbrew

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Why 1998 Was the Best Year In Film History

27 April 2015 12:46 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century.  Check here for a complete list of our essays. Just one glance at the Oscar nominees for 1998 might make it seem less a questionable choice for “best year in film” — and more an insane one.   Instead of a 1974 – The Godfather II, The Conversation, Chinatown, Blazing Saddles, Young Frankenstein, etc – or even a 1994, where Shawshank, Quiz Show, and Pulp Fiction lost to Gump – you choose a year where the Oscars would allow Roberto Benigni to climb atop both the figurative and literal chairs of the Shrine?   Fine, step away from the Oscars. Would you still celebrate a year that saw not one, but two movies about asteroids threatening the Earth?  A year that saw such scars carved across cinematic history as Patch Adams, My Giant, Stepmom, and Krippendorf’s Tribe?   It bears repeating: Krippendorf’S Tribe? »

- Michael Oates Palmer

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Jack Nicholson Facts: 25 Things You Didn't Know About the Iconic Actor

22 April 2015 2:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Let's hope Jack Nicholson has a pleasant birthday on Wednesday, or at least a less disturbing one than the birthday when pal Hunter S. Thompson showed up outside his house, turned on a spotlight, blasted a recording of a pig being eaten alive by bears, fired several rounds from his 9mm pistol, and (when the terrified actor and his kids refused to open the door) left an elk's heart on the doorstep.

Nicholson turns 78 on April 22, and even though he hasn't been in a movie for five years, he still looms large in our collective imaginations. Younger viewers know him from his flamboyant performances in "The Departed," "The Bucket List," "Something's Gotta Give," and "Anger Management," but his older films remain ubiquitous on TV as well, including "As Good as It Gets," "A Few Good Men," "Batman," "The Witches of Eastwick," "Terms of Endearment," "The Shining," and "Chinatown." A late bloomer, »

- Gary Susman

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Hollywood’s Most Infamous Feuds Between Actors and Directors

20 March 2015 8:00 AM, PDT | VH1.com | See recent VH1.com news »

Hollywood is not exactly a warm and fuzzy place where everyone gets along like best friends. That’s why so many film sets are hotbeds for drama. But no drama is more intense than the art-infused feuds between actor and director, because Art!

Here are some of the biggest and best actor-director fights in film history.

Mo’Nique and Lee Daniels

Let’s start with the most recent. After Mo’Nique won an Oscar for her role in Precious, she says Daniels told her she was blackballed for not playing the Hollywood game. Then recently she announced that she’d been offered roles in both The Butler and Empire, but never heard anything more until she learned Oprah and Taraji P. Henson were respectively playing what she’d been led to believe were her roles. Despite the struggles, Mo’Nique says she “could work with Lee Daniels tomorrow.”

David O. Russell »

- Courtney Enlow

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Dick Bakalyan, Character Actor Who Appeared in ‘Chinatown,’ Dies at 84

11 March 2015 10:12 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Character actor Richard (Dick) Bakalyan, who famously appeared in “Chinatown” as Loach, the partner of Jake Gittes’ former partner, who plays a key role in the movie’s climax, among many other films and TV shows, died in his sleep in Elmira, N.Y. on February 27 of a cerebral hemorrhage. He was 84.

Bakalyan was known for his broken nose and a streetwise twist of a phrase. Some fans might not remember the name, but everyone knew the face; they’d wave and call to him from cars or on the street. He said, “You have to the ride the horse you’re given” — a dedication to authenticity and subtlety that ensured his portrayal was always appropriate to the role and the scene.

In his mid-20s, Bakalyan appeared as an antisocial teen in “The Delinquents,” “The Delicate Delinquent,” “Juvenile Jungle” and “Hot Car Girl,” among others. By 30, he graduated to »

- Variety Staff

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Dick Bakalyan, Character Actor Who Appeared in ‘Chinatown,’ Dies at 84

11 March 2015 10:12 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Character actor Richard (Dick) Bakalyan, who famously appeared in “Chinatown” as Loach, the partner of Jake Gittes’ former partner, who plays a key role in the movie’s climax, among many other films and TV shows, died in his sleep in Elmira, N.Y. on February 27 of a cerebral hemorrhage. He was 84.

Bakalyan was known for his broken nose and a streetwise twist of a phrase. Some fans might not remember the name, but everyone knew the face; they’d wave and call to him from cars or on the street. He said, “You have to the ride the horse you’re given” — a dedication to authenticity and subtlety that ensured his portrayal was always appropriate to the role and the scene.

In his mid-20s, Bakalyan appeared as an antisocial teen in “The Delinquents,” “The Delicate Delinquent,” “Juvenile Jungle” and “Hot Car Girl,” among others. By 30, he graduated to »

- Variety Staff

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John Ostrander: “Forget it, Jake. It’s Chinatown.”

8 March 2015 5:00 AM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

Jake Gittes: How much are you worth?

Noah Cross: I have no idea. How much do you want?

Jake Gittes: I just wanna know what you’re worth. More than 10 million?

Noah Cross: Oh my, yes!

Jake Gittes: Why are you doing it? How much better can you eat? What could you buy that you can’t already afford?

Noah Cross: The future, Mr. Gittes! The future. Now, where’s the girl? I want the only daughter I’ve got left. As you found out, Evelyn was lost to me a long time ago.

Jake Gittes: Who do you blame for that? Her?

Noah Cross: I don’t blame myself. You see, Mr. Gittes, most people never have to face the fact that at the right time and the right place, they’re capable of anything.

Chinatown. Robert Towne, script. Roman Polanski, director.

Chinatown is a masterpiece, »

- John Ostrander

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Remembering Leonard Nimoy, David Carr, Bruce Sinofsky and Other Reel-Important People We Lost in February

3 March 2015 9:00 PM, PST | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

Reel-Important People is a monthly column that highlights those individuals in or related to the movies that have left us in recent weeks. Below you'll find names big and small and from all areas of the industry, though each was significant to the movies in his or her own way. Sam Andrew (1941-2015) - Guitarist. As a member of Big Brother and the Holding Company, he appears in the films Monterey Pop (see below), JanisFeed Your Head and Ball and Chain. He died on February 12. (THR) Richard Bakalyan (1931-2015) - Character Actor. Best known as Detective Loach in Chinatown (see below), he also appears in Robin and the 7 HoodsThe Greatest Story Ever ToldThe Shaggy D.A., The Computer Wore Tennis...

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»

- Christopher Campbell

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8 Actors Who Beat The S**t Out Of Their Director

24 February 2015 8:39 AM, PST | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Focus Features

Actors and directors have always clashed – it’s part of the process of filmmaking to butt heads over creative decisions, with director and star often having their own individual interpretations for how a movie should play out. Star and director artistically duking it out is normal on a film set, but only rarely does the process actually lead to full-blown arguments, much less physical fights.

There have, of course, been instances where actor/director partnerships have proven volatile. Faye Dunaway famously threw a cup of urine in Roman Polanski’s face in reaction to his harsh treatment of her on Chinatown, while Robert Downey Jr. has said David Fincher’s relentless tactics for drawing the performances he wanted from actors on Zodiac had him consider “garroting” the director.

With others, it should’ve been predictable from the off that things wouldn’t necessarily go smoothly – though Werner Herzog »

- Brogan Morris

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The Untold Story: How Radius Brought the Edward Snowden Doc ‘Citizenfour’ to America

15 February 2015 9:33 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Scott Feinberg

The Hollywood Reporter

Just over a year ago, Tom Quinn, who along with Jason Janego runs Radius-twc, the Weinstein Co. division that specializes in both VOD and theatrical releases, got an urgent, but mysterious phone call from Josh Braun of the Submarine sales agency. “He said, ‘Listen, I’ve got this interesting project I want to talk to you about,'” Quinn recalls. “I was like, ‘Great, what is it?’ And he goes, ‘Well, I’m not gonna talk to you about it here. Why don’t you meet me at the Red Egg in [New York’s] Chinatown for lunch. Don’t bring your cell phone.’ I was like, ‘Are you kidding?’ He was like, ‘No. Just don’t bring your cell phone.'” Chuckling, Quinn remembers, “I was like, ‘Am I gonna return to the office?'”

So began Radius’ involvement with CitizenfourLaura Poitras’ Oscar-nominated documentary about Edward Snowden. »

- Anjelica Oswald

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Beyond Narrative: The Future of the Feature Film

12 February 2015 12:01 PM, PST | blogs.suntimes.com/ebert | See recent Roger Ebert's Blog news »

Editor's Note: RogerEbert.com is proud to reprint Roger Ebert's 1978 entry from the Encyclopedia Britannica publication "The Great Ideas Today," part of "The Great Books of the Western World." Reprinted with permission from The Great Ideas Today ©1978 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

It's a measure of how completely the Internet has transformed communication that I need to explain, for the benefit of some younger readers, what encyclopedias were: bound editions summing up all available knowledge, delivered to one's home in handsome bound editions. The "Great Books" series zeroed in on books about history, poetry, natural science, math and other fields of study; the "Great Ideas" series was meant to tie all the ideas together, and that was the mission given to Roger when he undertook this piece about film.

Given the venue he was writing for, it's probably wisest to look at Roger's long, wide-ranging piece as a snapshot of the »

- Roger Ebert

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John Ostrander: Music To Write Comics By

8 February 2015 5:00 AM, PST | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

I love movie and television soundtracks. I’ll often use a given soundtrack while I work, letting it fuel my writing. I can’t listen to music with lyrics in them; that interferes with my process. I’ll get themes, characters, even scenes or whole plots from the music. Soundtrack music is in service of the story that the film is trying to tell; it’s a part of the narrative, heightening the emotion that’s being invoked.

I have my own particular favorites. The composers usually have a large body of work but certain key works resonate within me – Jerry Goldsmith’s Chinatown and Patton, James Horner with Field of Dreams, Shaun Davey’s Waking Ned Devine, Elmer Bernstein’s To Kill A Mockingbird (has there ever been a more beautiful and evocative theme?) and, of course, The Magnificent Seven.

I’ve also been very fond of Alan Silvestri »

- John Ostrander

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Cool Videos: Jack Nicholson accepts award from set of Cuckoo's Nest

5 February 2015 1:35 PM, PST | JoBlo.com | See recent JoBlo news »

My favorite actor of all time accepting an award for one of my favorite movies of all time might just be the greatest acceptance speech ever. It’s 1975 and Jack Nicholson is seen in the video accepting his Leading Actor award for his performance in The Last Detail and Chinatown on the set of One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest. You can also see a young Danny Devito in character, how great is this? Too bad Nurse Ratched had to ruin it all. This clip was posted online as part »

- Graham McMorrow

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 29 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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