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Movie Review – Blood Harvest (2016)

Blood Harvest (2016)

Directed by George Clarke

Starring Robert Render, Jean-Paul Van der Velde, Griffin Madill, Alan Crawford and Liam Rowan

Synopsis:

A rural village is terrorized by an evil force that drains the blood from its victims. A discredited police detective, who believes the killings are the work of vampires, must team up with his former partner to uncover the truth.

When your film opens with a torture scene where a young woman has her mouth sewn together and her eye gouged out with a fork by a killer wearing a mask akin to something from a steam punk fair, you know the type of film you’re in for. Low budget horror director and writer George Clarke’s latest effort Blood Harvest is a bizarre piece of filmmaking that seems to equate to a bunch of killing scenes and a hilarious third act.

Our lead character is Jack (Robert Render
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

George Cole's Arthur Daley – a wideboy loved by liberals and Thatcherites alike

Minder’s wheeler-dealer opportunist charmed his way on screen just as the actor won the hearts of viewers with his crooked comic turn

“Right at the top,” said George Cole when asked where he placed his role as crooked second-hand car dealer Arthur Daley in Minder in his distinguished career. He was right. When first broadcast, it felt like a vehicle for Dennis Waterman, fresh out of The Sweeney, and given further opportunity to dish out right-handers to some of London’s nastiest villains.

Today, The Sweeney looks inadvertently comical and dated on repeated viewing. Minder might too, were it not for Daley, a timeless, silken comic creation. For a certain type of “bloke”, heaven can be found in a surprise Sunday-afternoon repeat of Minder, alone on a sofa with a sneaky can of lukewarm lager. It’s not the vicarious thrill of watching Terry punch his way out of trouble that they enjoy,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Aubrey Morris, ‘Clockwork Orange’ Actor, Dead at 89

Aubrey Morris, ‘Clockwork Orange’ Actor, Dead at 89
British character actor Aubrey Morris, best known for playing the probation officer in Stanley Kubrick’s 1971 cult film “A Clockwork Orange” has died, his agent confirmed on Friday. He was 89. During his five-decade career, Morris also appeared as a grave-digger opposite Christopher Lee and Edward Woodward in the cult horror film “The Wicker Man” as well as such films as “Lisztomania,” Woody Allen’s “Love and Death” and “My Girl 2.” His many TV credits include “The Saint,” “The Sweeney,” “The Prisoner,” “The Avengers” and BBC drama “Cold Comfort Farm.” Also Read: Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2015 (Photos) Born in Portsmouth,
See full article at The Wrap »

‘A Clockwork Orange’ Actor Aubrey Morris Dies at 89

‘A Clockwork Orange’ Actor Aubrey Morris Dies at 89
London — Actor Aubrey Morris, best known for his role as Mr. Deltoid in Stanley Kubrick’s “A Clockwork Orange,” has died. He was 89.

Morris died Wednesday, his agent told the BBC.

The character actor had a memorable scene in “A Clockwork Orange” in which his probation officer character cautions the protagonist, Alex (played by Malcolm McDowell), about getting into trouble. “I’m warning you, little Alex, being a good friend to you as always, the one man in this sore and sick community who wants to save you from yourself,” Morris says in the scene (below).

The British actor’s other movie credits include Robin Hardy’s horror film “The Wicker Man,” the musical “Lisztomania,” Woody Allen’s comedy “Love and Death” and the dramedy “My Girl 2,” with Dan Aykroyd and Jamie Lee Curtis.

His five-decade long career also included TV work. He made his first TV appearance in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

A Clockwork Orange actor Aubrey Morris dies, aged 89

A Clockwork Orange actor Aubrey Morris dies, aged 89
Character actor Aubrey Morris has died, aged 89.

Morris, who passed away yesterday (July 15), had roles in numerous cult classics on the big and small screen over a 50-year period.

He was perhaps most widely known for his brief but memorable part in A Clockwork Orange, as Alex's unnerving probation officer Mr Deltoid.

Other movies included The Wicker Man, Love and Death and Lisztomania, while he made TV appearances in The Prisoner, The Avengers, The Sweeney and The Saint.

Morris also had multiple theatre roles on the West End and Broadway, while his final acting appearance came earlier this year in Us comedy series It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia.

Watch Morris in A Clockwork Orange with Malcolm McDowell below:
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Warren Clarke 1947-2014

Warren Clarke 1947-2014
To some he will always be a Droog. To others, Dalziel. It’s a tribute to the acting abilities of Warren Clarke that he was able to inhabit such a diverse range of characters through his long career on screens both big and small. The actor has died at the age of 67.After leaving school at 15, he initially worked as a copy boy at the Manchester Evening News and had dreams of being a footballer before the acting bug bit and he began performing in amateur dramatics at the Huddersfield Rep and the Liverpool Playhouse. The Oldham-born actor soon took to the small screen, getting his start on venerable soap Coronation Street and appearing in ITV series such as Play Of The Week and Playhouse before moving to a wide range of guest shots on TV series including The Avengers, Softly, Softly, The Sweeney and Minder, among many others.He
See full article at EmpireOnline »

Lynda Bellingham: a life in clips

The actor and presenter, who has died aged 66, was famous for her role as the Oxo mum, but also starred in Doctor Who, All Creatures Great and Small and The Bill, and hosted Loose Women

The actor and presenter Lynda Bellingham, who has died aged 66, enjoyed a long and varied career on British television. In addition to her iconic Oxo mum role in the long-running adverts, and her presenting stint on the chat show Loose Women, she also had roles in iconic shows such as Z Cars, Doctor Who, The Sweeney and The Professionals. Here are some of her finest small-screen moments.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Film Review: ‘Hyena’

Film Review: ‘Hyena’
Any director who titles his film “Hyena” is setting himself up for critical wisecracks about creative scavenging — and true enough, Gerard Johnson’s ultraviolent crooked-cop thriller wears its plethora of genre influences, from Nicolas Winding Refn to “The Sweeney,” prominently on its sleeve. What “Hyena” lacks in invention, however, it makes up for in technical bravado and geographical specificity, its vivid West London milieu coloring a stock story of a corrupt narcotics detective (the excellent Peter Ferdinando) whose chickens come home most bloodily to roost. A punchy but distinctly downbeat curtain-raiser for this year’s Edinburgh fest, Johnson’s stylish sophomore feature reps a commercial challenge theatrically — too oblique for the exploitation crowd, too grimy for upscale auds — but should continue to attract strong-stomached admirers in ancillary.

While frequently blunt in expression, Johnson’s script is never so literal as to directly articulate its title; the bottom-feeding metaphor is pretty
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Doctor Who: the film careers of Patrick Troughton & Tom Baker

Feature Alex Westthorp 9 Apr 2014 - 07:00

In the next part of his series, Alex talks us through the film careers of the second and fourth Doctors, Patrick Troughton and Tom Baker...

Read Alex's retrospective on the film careers of William Hartnell and Jon Pertwee, here.

Like their fellow Time Lord actors, William Hartnell and Jon Pertwee, Patrick Troughton and Tom Baker also shared certain genres of film. Both appeared, before and after their time as the Doctor, in horror movies and both worked on Ray Harryhausen Sinbad films.

Patrick George Troughton was born in Mill Hill, London on March 25th 1920. He made his film debut aged 28 in the 1948 B-Movie The Escape. Troughton's was a very minor role. Among the better known cast was William Hartnell, though even Hartnell's role was small and the two didn't share any scenes together. From the late Forties, Troughton found more success on the small screen,
See full article at Den of Geek »

McM announce October’s London Comic Con guest line-up

McM Expo/London Comic Con returns to ExCel London on 25th – 27th October. As well as hosting a galaxy of great sci-fi, movie, games, comics, anime and cosplay content, they’ve also got their usual huge line up of special guests – with more guests being added all the time! see www.mcmcomiccon.com for the latest London Comic Con news – but here’s a round-up of who’s been announced so far:

Red hot fantasy-noir show Lost Girl is coming to McM London Comic Com, with stars Ksenia Solo (Black Swan, Life Unexpected) and Rachel Skarsten (Transporter: The Series, Birds Of Prey) plus executive producer Jay Firestone (Andromeda, La Femme Nikita). Stars from hit sci-fi series Warehouse 13: Kelly Hu (Arrow, X-Men 2, The Vampire Diaries); Eddie McClintock (Bones, Desperate Housewives) and actor/director Saul Rubinek (Frasier, Curb Your Enthusiasm). The stars of new crime thriller By Any Means: Warren Brown (Luther,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

The HeyUGuys Interview: Stephen Tompkinson Gives Us the Lowdown on Harrigan

  • HeyUGuys
Before British cop drama Harrigan hits our cinema screens on September 20, we had the great pleasure of speaking to the lead role, Detective Harrigan himself, Stephen Tompkinson.

Harrigan – which is director Vince Woods debut feature film, is set in a bleak, 1970s North East, where a close-to-retirement cop Barry Harrigan returns to his hometown with a score to settle. Tompkinson, who has made a name for himself in films such as Brassed Off and TV shows such as In Deep, speaks of his own experience in Britain from the time this film is set, and what attracted him to the role – while he reflects on what has been a triumphant, and certainly expansive career.

So what first attracted you to the role of Harrigan?

Vincent Woods, the film’s director, came to see me the year before we started shooting. I was doing live theatre in Newcastle in a play by my friend Shaun Prendergast,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

UK television neglecting older writers, says 'Bergerac' creator

Veteran television writer Robert Banks Stewart has claimed that older writers are neglected by today's television industry,

Banks Stewart - who created the popular detective dramas Bergerac and Shoestring - spoke to Digital Spy about his decision to adapt his TV pitch The Hurricane's Tail into his first novel.

"Back when I was still firing in possible new series, I began to feel that the attitude was, 'He's nearly 70, this guy - forget it' - it was a bit deflating when a Head of Drama doesn't write back to you, but gets his secretary to do it," said the 81-year-old.

"That was my experience then and there's a lot of writers I know - especially around my age - who have been finding it very hard to get any ideas over."

Banks Stewart - who wrote for Doctor Who, The Sweeney and The Avengers as well - also criticised "top
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

'Harry Potter' and 'History Boys' Star Richard Griffiths Has Died at 65

Sad news to start this Good Friday comes from across the pond as Reuters reports Harry Potter franchise star Richard Griffiths has passed away at 65 from complications following heart surgery. The British actor, who played Harry Potter's nasty Uncle Vernon in the multi-billion dollar series, has been acting for nearly 30 years, taking pivotal roles in both TV and film. His early career started on UK series like "The Sweeney" and "Minder" and would later return to the small screen for "Pie in the Sky" and "A King of Living." However, it's Griffiths presence as a character actor on the big screen that audiences remember. Griffiths brought one of his many stage roles (that landed him the Laurence Olivier award in 2005) to life in a film adaptation of The History Boys in 2006, but before that he had already starred in several critically lauded and world famous films like Gandhi and Chariots of Fire.
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

'Withnail & I' actor Richard Griffiths dies, aged 65

'Withnail & I' actor Richard Griffiths dies, aged 65
Richard Griffiths has died at the age of 65.

Griffiths's agent Simon Beresford confirmed that the award-winning actor passed away on Thursday (March 28) after complications following heart surgery.

The British actor was most recently seen in the play The Sunshine Boys alongside Danny DeVito.

Griffiths had an acting career spanning over 30 years, first appearing in the 1975 movie It Shouldn't Happen to a Vet.

Since then, he has had roles in much-loved films such as Pirates of The Caribbean: On Stranger Tides and Hugo, as well as classic TV series including Pie in the Sky, Minder, The Sweeney and Bergerac.

Griffiths won a Laurence Olivier Award and a Tony Award for 'Best Actor' when he starred in the play The History Boys.

He most notably appeared as Uncle Vernon in the Harry Potter series and as Uncle Monty in Withnail & I.

His Harry Potter and Equus co-star Daniel Radcliffe told BBC News
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Roger Hammond obituary

Actor known for his roles as clergymen, favourite uncles and tragic-comic characters

There is a great tradition in the rotundity of actors, and Roger Hammond, who has died aged 76 of cancer, stands proudly in a line stretching from Francis L Sullivan and Willoughby Goddard through to Roy Kinnear, Desmond Barrit and Richard Griffiths, though he was probably more malleably benevolent on stage than any of them.

He reeked of kindness, consideration and imperturbability, with a pleasant countenance and a beautiful, soft voice, qualities ideal for unimpeachable clergymen, favourite uncles and tragic-comic characters such as Waffles in Chekhov's Uncle Vanya (whom he played in a 1991 BBC TV film, with David Warner and Ian Holm), a man whose wife left him for another man on his wedding day but who has remained faithful to her and forgiving ever since.

Hammond grew up in Stockport, Lancashire. His chartered accountant father was managing director of his own family firm,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Roger Hammond obituary

Actor known for his roles as clergymen, favourite uncles and tragic-comic characters

There is a great tradition in the rotundity of actors, and Roger Hammond, who has died aged 76 of cancer, stands proudly in a line stretching from Francis L Sullivan and Willoughby Goddard through to Roy Kinnear, Desmond Barrit and Richard Griffiths, though he was probably more malleably benevolent on stage than any of them.

He reeked of kindness, consideration and imperturbability, with a pleasant countenance and a beautiful, soft voice, qualities ideal for unimpeachable clergymen, favourite uncles and tragic-comic characters such as Waffles in Chekhov's Uncle Vanya (whom he played in a 1991 BBC TV film, with David Warner and Ian Holm), a man whose wife left him for another man on his wedding day but who has remained faithful to her and forgiving ever since.

Hammond grew up in Stockport, Lancashire. His chartered accountant father was managing director of his own family firm,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

British Independent Film Awards nominations announced in London

The nominations for the 15th annual Moët British Independent Film Awards have been unveiled in London.

They were announced by patron Adrian Lester (above), the Birmingham-born actor whose credits include The Day After Tomorrow and TV series Being Human, Bonekickers, Merlin and Hustle.

In a statement, joint directors of the awards Johanna von Fischer & Tessa Collinson said: "In this our 15th year, we are delighted to welcome back six-time former host James Nesbitt.

"We would like to take this opportunity to thank our dedicated Pre-Selection Committee who watched over 200 films in order to produce the 2012 nominations, which once again reflect the diverse range of British film talent, and also welcome this year's appointed independent jury who will now spend the next month considering the nominated films."

The highest number of nominations this year goes to Broken with 9 nominations including Best Film, Best Director and Best Debut Director for Rufus Norris,
See full article at The Geek Files »

Broken fixed up with nine British independent film award nominations

Rufus Norris's drama about an 11-year-old diabetic leads the pack in a year otherwise devoted to honouring older stars

Broken, the feature-film debut of award-winning theatre and opera director Rufus Norris, has emerged as the surprise frontrunner at this year's Bifas, the British independent film awards, with nine nominations. This year's judges have also doffed their caps to the elder generation of British acting talent, with Judi Dench, Vanessa Redgrave, Maggie Smith and Terence Stamp among the notable nominees.

A coming-of-age drama, adapted from Daniel Clay's 2008 novel, about a young girl living in a British suburb, which premiered to mixed reviews at the Cannes film festival in May but went on to win the Golden Eye award for best international film at the Zurich film festival, Broken stars Eloise Laurence as 11-year-old diabetic Skunk, along with Tim Roth, Cillian Murphy and Roy Kinnear. Critics have praised its acting
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

British Independent Film Awards Nominations Announced

  • HeyUGuys
Celebrating its fifteenth year, The Moët British Independent Film Awards have now been announced, honouring some of the finest independent films released in Britain this year.

This year’s awards will be held on 9th December, and you can be sure we’ll be bringing you the results on the night as they come in. It’s been another excellent year for British cinema, and it’s always nice to see films like these get the recognition they deserve.

Last year, Paddy Considine’s powerful directorial debut, Tyrannosaur, swept the top awards, taking Best Film, Best Directorial Debut, and Best Actress; Lynne Ramsay took home the Best Director award for We Need to Talk About Kevin; and Michael Fassbender’s remarkable performance in Steve McQueen’s Shame was rightfully honoured with Best Actor (whereas the film was sadly absent from the Oscars at the start of the year).

James Nesbitt
See full article at HeyUGuys »
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