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The Six Million Dollar Man (TV Series 1974–1978) Poster

Trivia

The characters of Oscar Goldman (Richard Anderson) and Rudy Wells (Martin E. Brooks) appeared on both this series and its spinoff, The Bionic Woman (1976). When the spinoff moved to another network, this practice continued. This was the first time the same continuing characters appeared on two different TV series broadcast on two different networks at the same time.
Early episodes of the series had Austin killing villains on occasion. As it became clear that Austin was becoming a role model for kids, the level of violence in the series decreased, with Austin rarely (if ever) actually killing anyone.
Ex-USAF pilot and NASA PR man Martin Caidin's 1971 novel "Cyborg" was the source material for this show.
Near the end of the series, Lee Majors experimented with changing Austin's look by growing a mustache. This proved unpopular and the idea was dropped, but not before a number of commercial tie-ins, including a comic book and a lunch box, had been produced with the new look.
The aircraft seen crashing in the show's opening sequence was an M2-F2, a "lifting body configuration" built by Northrop. The audio sound effects are from a crash that occurred on May 10, 1967, at Edwards Air Force base in California (although the dialog heard was recorded by Majors). The test pilot, Bruce Peterson, hit the ground at 250 mph, tumbling six times. He lost use of his right eye following an infection and had to stop flying, ending his career. Understandably, Peterson has said that he hated reliving his accident, week after week, courtesy of the show.
When the show was broadcast in Israel, it was called "The Man Who Is worth Millions". This was due to the fact that, in Israel, the number six million is associated with the Holocaust
In Spanish-speaking countries, the series is known as El hombre nuclear ("The Nuclear Man").
In the spring of 1977, before production began on what would be the show's final season, Lee Majors refused to go to work until contract demands were met. At one point it was reported that producers were considering hiring a new actor to take over the series. Among those considered were Gil Gerard, Caitlyn Jenner (then Bruce Jenner), and Harrison Ford (the producers said he was unsuitable as an action hero).
The characters Steve Austin and Jamie Sommers (from The Bionic Woman (1976)) were ranked #19 in TV Guide's list of the "25 Greatest Sci-Fi Legends" (1 August 2004 issue).
The creator of "The Six Million Dollar Man" lived in Cocoa Beach. Martin Caidin, author of 'Cyborg', was the creator of the fictional Steve Austin and used the name of Dr. Rudy Wells in the novel with permission of a rather eccentric Cocoa Beach physician of the same name who used to wear roller skates in his office as he saw patients. In 1997, Caidin's ashes were scattered from the air over the Cocoa Beach coastline as he was particularly attached to the Space coast area.
Martin Caidin based the character of Steve Austin on astronauts David Scott and Eugene Cernan (commanders of Apollo 15 and 17, respectively).
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Harve Bennett is the voice in the opening of the show that says, "Steve Austin: a man barely alive." He did this recording after Richard Anderson had already recorded the rest of the monologue. Anderson was not available at the time to record the addition, so Bennett did it himself.
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The exterior shots of OSI Headquarters are actually the Russell Senate Office Building as seen from the Senate side of the Capitol, across Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC.
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According to Lee Majors, he did 90% of his own stunts.
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Andre The Giant played the first series version of BIG FOOT.
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The opening sequence has been paid homage to in two TV commercials - one by Coors Light in the mid-1990s and the 2012 Mazda CX5 crossover utility vehicle.
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The real-life plane crash in the opening credits was caused by a news helicopter that intruded on the restricted air space for the test flight. Pilot Bruce Peterson had to suddenly swerve to avoid a collision causing the crash.
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In almost every episode Steve will say either "You bet," or "You got it."
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Martin Caidin originally wanted Monte Markham for the role of Steve Austin.
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Monte Markham actually portrayed The Seven million dollar man alongside Lee Majors with an epic fight climax. Monte Markham's character named was changed from Barney Miller to Barney Hiller after the TV police comedy became popular.
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Within the first two seasons, one of Steve's commonly explained covers for his bionic eye ability is that he "eats a lot of carrots."
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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