IMDb > "Happy Days" (1974) > Reviews & Ratings - IMDb
"Happy Days"
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany creditsepisode listepisodes castepisode ratings... by rating... by votes
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsmessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summaryplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Reviews & Ratings for
"Happy Days" More at IMDbPro »

Filter: Hide Spoilers:
Page 1 of 8:[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [Next]
Index 71 reviews in total 

48 out of 58 people found the following review useful:

Note to Joel S., The Fonz WAS Cool!

Author: TorontoJediMaster from Toronto, Ontario, Canada
28 August 2004

I don't know what Joel S. was watching when he was making comments about Fonzie being a loser.

Fonzie was supposed to be older than the rest of the gang, but not by that many years. Perhaps it was because Henry Winkler was older than the rest of the cast that he looked, as you said, twenty years older.

Fonzie never dated high school girls. He knew they were too young for him. He had morals.

Fonzie being an illiterate high school drop-out? I don't know where you got that from. Fonzie had dropped out of high school when the show started, but one of plot points of the episode where Richie graduated high school was that Fonzie revealed that he'd been secretly going to night school to earn his high school diploma. He graduated with the rest of the gang.

Fonzie living above the Cunningham's garage. That was because he'd given up his own apartment to his grandmother after she'd been forced to leave her own place. He stayed above the garage for so long because he loved he Cunninghams like his own family. He essentially was a part of the family. In the last season, he did move out into a regular apartment. In the last episode he bought a house so that he would be allowed to adopt an orphaned boy he'd befriended. Gee...buying a house so you can provide a good home and be a good parent? Doesn't sound like a loser.

As well, Fonzie also worked several jobs at once. He was (or became) the owner of the garage he worked at. When Arnold's burned down, he put up money to help Al rebuild and became the part-owner. Then, he started teaching shop class at Jefferson High. He later went to a tough school and became the Dean of Boys, so he could help kids who needed guidance.

So, I think Fonzie was a cool character not because of his leather jacket, or motorcycle, or his prowess with girls. I think he was cool because he was a good person who was always willing to help a friend in need. Did you ever see the episode where Al wants to go down to Alabama to join a Civil Rights march? (This was a later episode when the time was the 1960's). Fonzie is concerned about Al's safety and goes with him to look out for him. Fonzie joins Al and a young African-American man in a sit-in at a diner. That doesn't sound like something a loser would do.

Was the above review useful to you?

29 out of 35 people found the following review useful:

A Classic Like a '57 Chevy

Author: Brian Washington (Sargebri@att.net) from Los Angeles, California
19 June 2003

This was one of the greatest shows of the 1970's. Many people think of it as a simple comedy, but in the early years the series tackled some serious issues such as racism and nuclear war. The strength of the show was the friendship between Richie and Fonzie. The chemistry between Ron Howard and Henry Winkler made this show a classic. Unfortunately, after Howard left, they tried to keep the show going by focusing on Joanie and Chachi and that was when the show began to go downhill. However, just ignore the final years of the show and pay attention to the early years.

Was the above review useful to you?

23 out of 32 people found the following review useful:

Really good show from the 70s....less so in the 80s...

Author: gazzo-2 from United States
3 February 2005

I remember when this show was King, c. '76 or so, Tuesdays at 8pm. It was one of those shows that you watched faithfully, got into the characters, jokes, knew the punchlines beforehand every time, and talked about the day after w/ friends. Kids loved it the most, as the Fonz Was a TV hero like you don't see anymore.

I always felt that this should have ended about 5 years before it did too-when Malph and Richie left. Putting the show on in the 80's w/ Chachi as a lead, set in the '60's, Ted McGinley, etc--it was really outta gas and a shadow of its former self. If you ever see the repeats from c. '82 you know what I mean.

Happy Days was the Malachi Crunch, Fonz jumping things on his bike, swarmed by 'the chicks', Richie learning about adulthood from Fonz, and of course Mr and Mrs C offering their bemused, befuddled support. That was the show. I don't think you could make it again.

*** outta ****

Was the above review useful to you?

23 out of 32 people found the following review useful:

I love Happy Days!

Author: Debfearn from Derbyshire, England
4 December 2004

I am 14 years old and I love Happy Days- there should be more programs like it now! I am a fan of older TV shows, as well as new ones [I love Starsky and Hutch], but If I ever need cheering up- I always put Happy Days on. I think I watch at least one episode a day and it puts me in a good mood!

All the characters are fantastic- Richie, Potsie, Ralph, Joanie etc..and who could ever forget The Fonz? What I love about Fonzie is that he is so cool but is also a softie and loves his 'family' The Cunninghams so much.

Watch Happy Days- you won't regret it!

To Happy Days!

Was the above review useful to you?

15 out of 19 people found the following review useful:

The Fonz and Others.

Author: tfrizzell from United States
7 June 2004

"American Graffiti"-styled television show that ran a decade (1974-1984) and completed a mind-blowing 255 episodes in all. The show followed the Cunningham family (father Tom Bosley, mother Marion Ross, son Ron Howard and daughter Erin Moran) in Milwaukee throughout the 1950s. Howard, his friends (Don Most and Anson Williams) and their misadventures with school and girls dominated the show's story-lines early on. Would-be motorcycle tough guy punk Henry Winkler (aka Fonzie) stole the show from minute one and he was the main reason why the show survived so long. Cast departures (Howard, Most and diner owner Pat Morita) and additions (Ted McGinley, Scott Baio, Al Molinaro and Morita again) did nothing to change ratings as the show consistently stayed high on the Nielsen scale. Also the father of two lesser spin-offs ("Laverne & Shirley" and "Joanie Loves Chachi"), "Happy Days" proved that one amazing character (Fonz) could basically carry a program's list of shortcomings. 4 stars out of 5.

Was the above review useful to you?

16 out of 22 people found the following review useful:

They were indeed!

Author: grendelkhan from Xanadu
6 September 2003

Yes, those were Happy Days, when I watched this show as a child. For quite a while, this was the best show on tv. It outstayed its welcome, but it shined for a time.

The success of the show rests heavily on the performances of Ron Howard, Henry Winkler, Tom Bosley, and Marion Ross. Henry Winkler had tremendous charisma and handled his role with great subtlety, until the writing got out of hand. Ron Howard was the rare case of a child actor whose talent matured with his body. Tom Bosley and Marion Ross were outstanding character actors who brought life to Howard and Marion Cunningham. The cast was rounded out by fine supporting players and guest stars.

It was interesting to watch the 50's nostalgia evolve to the point that the time period was no longer mentioned in the show. It seemed that, by the end, it was set in the present. It's interesting to watch the earliest seasons, with episodes revolving around Adlai Stevenson vs. Eisenhower, or Rock 'N' Roll shows; and compare those to shows revolving around Fonzie as a teacher.

It's a shame that memories of Happy Days are tainted by the later years, and that stupid "jumping the shark" phrase. For a time, this show was unbeatable. It created successful spin-offs, like "Laverne and Shirley" and "Mork and Mindy," as well as less successful ones like "Joannie Loves Chachi." It ruled Tuesday nights and was one of the top ten shows for a long part of its existence.

The one question that remains from this show is, "What happened to Chuck?" Maybe he died in Vietnam, with the Beaver. Oh, wait, that was an urban legend. Maybe he was recruited into the CIA.

Was the above review useful to you?

10 out of 14 people found the following review useful:

Happy Days

Author: Tim Cox from Marietta, OH
6 September 1999

One of the most popular television series of all time! It had it all; humor, heart and of course, the Fonz, played perfectly during the show's 10 year run by Henry Winkler. The show also featured great writing and directing and was supported by fans all around the world. It's one of those unique television experiences that should be bottled up and stored away for safe keeping, so that new generations of fans can appreciate and enjoy this treat just as we did.

Was the above review useful to you?

5 out of 5 people found the following review useful:

Better in the beginning

Author: wikkedladi from Philadelphia
12 May 2000

When Happy Days aired, I was in grade school, and like all the kids in my day, I loved "The Fonz" and his "cool" image and what it represented. Of course, ratings are ratings, and the Fonzie became the dominant figure in the show.

Now, as I've watched the reruns on "Nickelodean", I have to admit that the show was of much better quality in its early episodes. It truly was a "family" show with a moral at the end of each episode, without being preachy. It seems that in those early episodes (the first year or year and a half), the show truly did capture the 50's suburban lifestyle.

Once Fonzie became the focus, it does seem now that the show got kind of silly and unbelieveable, and saturated by "Fonzie." Of course, it's not quality of writing that keeps shows alive, unfortunately, and I realize that the show wouldn't have survived as long as it had if it had kept its earlier format. Still, I do greatly enjoy those early episodes when I watch them.

Was the above review useful to you?

13 out of 21 people found the following review useful:

Why aren't great shows like this made anymore?

Author: Monika-5 from United States
5 July 2000

I've always thought Happy Days is one of the best shows ever. It was cool, the Cunninghams were great, as was the Fonz, Potsie and Ralph. In later years the love of Joanie and Chachi made the show worthwhile viewing after Richie and Ralph left.

The final season's two two-part episodes were great: the one where Richie comes home, then leaves to be a screenwriter in California (the last scene in that episode always makes me tear up) and the final episodes where Fonzie moves out and Joanie and Chachi get married. Also I loved the episode where Joanie had the crush on Potsie after he sings to her.

The cast and crew truly made Happy Days wonderful. They all had great chemistry, and this show is SO much funnier and better than all the junk shows that are on the air now.

I loved the joke Jay Leno told in a 1997 monolgue about prospective Presidential canidates Dan Quayle and Al Gore: "It's kind of like a race between Ralph Malph and Potsie on Happy Days, isn't it???"

Was the above review useful to you?

3 out of 3 people found the following review useful:

A Tale of 4 Sitcoms

5/10
Author: (Greatornot) from United States
15 February 2009

Once upon a time this show was legendary. The first 2 seasons were fantastic. Basically Fonzie was simply used in few spots and it worked. The mystique was there. It was a show about adolescence in the 50s and had a wonderful character named Chuck. Richies older brother that worked with added plot lines. Than they ditched Chuck for the second phase of HD and you still had a nice show but the mystique of Fonzie was gone. Also the original reason why the show was made was gone. The plots became somewhat sillier but they were acceptable. Bringing in Mork for an episode was silly and may have been the start of the downfall with all due respect for JUMP THE SHARK ep. Mork was not realistic. All of a sudden you had alien existence in a show intended to be realistic viewpoints of growing up adolescents in 1950s Midwest. The show would continue to get sillier with the addition of Chachi. Thus entering the 3rd stage of this show. With an occasional good episode but still a mere shell of its origins. The show at this time was full of itself. More for the marketing of products than anything else. Gary Marshall should be ashamed. Ron Howard left the show for the final stage of this train wreck and has made many wonderful movies as a director. The 4th stage was absolutely horrible. No Richie, but a parade of characters that very few had any affection for. Just sad the way this show was destroyed. I will always cherish the first couple of seasons and tolerate a few more toward the middle of this run. Just a bad way this show went out. The last episode was even so classless as to not show brother CHUCK in the collage ending this show . Thank goodness for earlier seasons coming out on DVD first.

Was the above review useful to you?


Page 1 of 8:[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [Next]

Add another review


Related Links

Plot summary Ratings Awards
External reviews Official site Plot keywords
Main details Your user reviews Your vote history