IMDb > Westworld (1973)
Westworld
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Westworld (1973) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
7.1/10   20,878 votes »
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Director:
Writer:
Michael Crichton (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for Westworld on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
21 November 1973 (USA) See more »
Tagline:
Westworld ...where robot men and women are programmed to serve you for ...Romance ...Violence ...Anything See more »
Plot:
A robot malfunction creates havoc and terror for unsuspecting vacationers at a futuristic, adult-themed amusement park. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
3 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
Succeeds in its aims, despite the plot holes See more (154 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Yul Brynner ... Gunslinger

Richard Benjamin ... Peter Martin

James Brolin ... John Blane

Norman Bartold ... Medieval Knight

Alan Oppenheimer ... Chief Supervisor
Victoria Shaw ... Medieval Queen

Dick Van Patten ... Banker
Linda Gaye Scott ... Arlette (as Linda Scott)

Steve Franken ... Technician
Michael T. Mikler ... Black Knight (as Michael Mikler)
Terry Wilson ... Sheriff

Majel Barrett ... Miss Carrie
Anne Randall ... Daphne
Julie Marcus ... Girl in Dungeon
Sharyn Wynters ... Apache Girl
Anne Bellamy ... Middle Aged Woman
Chris Holter ... Stewardess
Charles Seel ... Bellhop
Wade Crosby ... Bartender
Nora Marlowe ... Hostess
Lin Henson ... Ticket Girl
Orville Sherman ... Supervisor
C. Lindsay Workman ... Supervisor (as Lindsay Workman)
Lauren Gilbert ... Supervisor
Davis Roberts ... Supervisor
Howard Platt ... Supervisor
Richard Roat ... Technician
Kenneth Washington ... Technician

Jared Martin ... Technician
Robert Patten ... Technician
David M. Frank ... Technician (as David Frank)
Kip King ... Technician
David Man ... Technician
Larry Delaney ... Technician
Will J. White ... Workman
Ben Young ... Workman
Tom Falk ... Workman
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Barry Cahill ... 3rd Male Interviewee (uncredited)

Robert Hogan ... Delos Guests' Interviewer (uncredited)
Robert Nichols ... 1st Male Interviewee (uncredited)
Ty Randolph ... Girl in Saloon (uncredited)
Leoda Richards ... White-Haired Woman on Elevator (uncredited)
Paul Sorensen ... 2nd Male Interviewee (uncredited)

Directed by
Michael Crichton 
 
Writing credits
Michael Crichton (written by)

Produced by
Paul Lazarus III .... producer (as Paul N. Lazarus III)
Michael I. Rachmil .... associate producer
 
Original Music by
Fred Karlin 
 
Cinematography by
Gene Polito (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
David Bretherton 
 
Casting by
Leonard Murphy 
 
Art Direction by
Herman A. Blumenthal  (as Herman Blumenthal)
 
Set Decoration by
John P. Austin  (as John Austin)
 
Makeup Department
Frank Griffin .... makeup artist
Irving Pringle .... makeup artist
Dione Taylor .... hairdresser
 
Production Management
Claude Binyon Jr. .... unit production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Claude Binyon Jr. .... assistant director
James F. Boyle .... second assistant director (as James Boyle)
Craig Huston .... dga trainee (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Arthur Friedrich .... property master
 
Sound Department
Richard S. Church .... sound (as Richard Church)
Harry W. Tetrick .... sound
Ken Dufva .... foley artist (uncredited)
Van Allen James .... sound editor (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Charles Schulthies .... special effects
 
Visual Effects by
Brent Sellstrom .... visual effects coordinator
John Whitney Jr. .... automated image processing
Matthew Yuricich .... matte painter (uncredited)
 
Stunts
Bobby Bass .... stunts (uncredited)
Tony Brubaker .... stunt performer (uncredited)
Bill Catching .... stunts (uncredited)
Louie Elias .... stunts (uncredited)
Mickey Gilbert .... stunts (uncredited)
Chuck Hayward .... stunt double (uncredited)
Alan Oliney .... stunts (uncredited)
Charlie Picerni .... stunts (uncredited)
Dean Smith .... stunts (uncredited)
Terry Wilson .... stunts (uncredited)
Dick Ziker .... fire gag stunt (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Joseph A. August Jr. .... camera operator (as Joseph August)
Doug Byers .... electrician (uncredited)
Owen Marsh .... camera operator (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Richard Bruno .... wardrobe supervisor
Betsy Cox .... wardrobe: women's
 
Music Department
Bill Campbell .... musician: paino (uncredited)
Artie Kane .... musician: piano (uncredited)
Fred Karlin .... conductor (uncredited)
Tommy Morgan .... musician: harmonica (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Dick Ziker .... action scenes coordinator
Charles Lippincott .... unit publicist (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsSpecial Effects

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
88 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Metrocolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Australia:PG | Canada:PG (Manitoba/Ontario) | Canada:13+ (Quebec) | Finland:K-16 (cut) (1974) | France:-12 | Germany:16 (DVD rating) | Iceland:16 | Netherlands:12 | New Zealand:R16 | Norway:15 | Singapore:PG | Sweden:15 | UK:AA (original rating) (passed with cuts) | UK:15 (tv rating) | UK:15 (video rating) (1986) (1994) (2008) | USA:PG | West Germany:16 (nf)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
There were several minor injures during filming. During a shootout scene a piece of wadding from a blank cartridge struck Yul Brynner in the eye, scratching his cornea and leaving him unable to wear his light reflecting contacts without his injured eye turning red and tearing up, so shooting had to be maneuvered to allow time for his eye to heal. And during the scene where James Brolin's character was bitten by a rattlesnake, while the milked rattler was attached to Brolin's arm, he was bitten by the teeth on the snakes lower jaw, despite wearing padding on his arm made of leather and cotton.See more »
Goofs:
Audio/visual unsynchronized: When Peter demonstrates the gun's inability to fire on humans in their hotel room, the hammer hitting and the click sound are not in sync.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
Interviewer of Delos Guests:[hosting a commercial] Hi. Ed Ramsey from Delos. If there's anyone who doesn't know what Delos is, well, as we've always said: Delos is the vacation of the future, today. At Delos, you get your choice of the vacation you want. There's Medieval World, Roman World and, of course, Westworld. Let's talk to some of the people who've been there.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Sleeper (1973)See more »
Soundtrack:
Home on the RangeSee more »

FAQ

Why did the scientist/mechanic decide to give the gunslinger infrared vision and enhanced hearing capabilities?
See more »
99 out of 112 people found the following review useful.
Succeeds in its aims, despite the plot holes, 22 March 2005
Author: Brandt Sponseller from New York City

Set during an unspecified future era on Earth, Westworld features Peter Martin (Richard Benjamin) and John Blane (James Brolin) on their way to a new kind of amusement park, Delos, located way out in the middle of a desert. Delos is divided into three "virtual reality" areas, Roman World, Medieval World, and West World (or Westworld). These are not mere computer simulations, however. Guests are immersed in a complete recreation of the relevant eras--they wear the clothing, sleep in the accommodations, eat the food, and so on, relevant to the era. They also interact with robots that are nearly indistinguishable from humans, and can talk to, have sex with, and even kill some robots. It's an escapist's dream, at least until something goes wrong.

Westworld isn't the easiest film to rate. It has its share of faults, and the more one analyzes the plot, the more problems one can find. However, the premise is so fantastic, the atmosphere is so good (even though it's very spartan for a sci-fi film) and the performances from the principle actors are so entertaining that it is very easy to excuse any flaws and just "go with the film". The bottom line is how enjoyable or aesthetically rewarding a film is, not how logically taut the plot is. On those grounds, Westworld certainly deserves a 9 out of 10.

A lot of the attraction is the voyeuristic escapism experienced by the viewer. Who wouldn't want to be able to go to an amusement park like Delos? It's a fabulous idea, and a not-too-thinly-veiled satire/extrapolation of Disney World, which had just opened two years before this film was released (remember that Disney World is the Florida location; Disneyland is the California location). Walt Disney had already been talking about his original conception of EPCOT (which was quite different than the Epcot that was eventually opened in 1982) by 1967. Writer/director Michael Crichton's Delos is a rough combination of Disney World's theme parks with an EPCOT-like residency, if only a temporary one.

At the same time, computer and robot technology was finally starting to be strongly integrated into industry on an "everyday" level (it was just a bit more than 5 years until the beginning of the home computer revolution). Disney World's operational infrastructure is an extensive behind-the-scenes computer network, which Crichton parallels with his white lab coat-wearing scientists working amidst monitors and banks of flashing lights (and this is even better satirized in the sequel to Westworld, 1976's Futureworld).

The premise provides an easy launching pad for a number of ethical, philosophical and scientific dilemmas: What are the implications for killing someone when they seem almost identical to humans? What if they're artificially intelligent? Is it infidelity for married persons to have sex with robots almost identical to humans or artificially intelligent? If machines become sufficiently complex, won't they be prone to the same flaws as humans, such as viruses (or something analogous), and if artificially intelligent, disobedience? All of these questions and more are explored in Westworld, albeit most are not explicitly broached--probably in an attempt to avoid sounding preachy or over-intellectual.

Because at the heart of Westworld, at least on a surface level, is a fantastic thriller/suspense story. Once things begin to go wrong, the "play" turns deadly, and the end of the film is a very long, deliberately paced chase sequence. Yul Brynner is a menacing "Robot Gunslinger", in a character that Brynner thought of as an ominous satire on his Chris Adams from The Magnificent Seven (1960), and which eventually seems somewhat prescient of The Terminator (1984). The suspense/horror is based on a classic gambit of machines forcefully taking control of their creators. It may be more modern, but basically the threat is that of the wronged Frankenstein Monster, with all the attendant subtexts, including humans "playing God" as they create other beings in their own image, and dehumanization of the Other.

It's best while watching to not dwell on the quagmire of plot problems that aren't dealt with. If the guns in Westworld can't harm humans because of "heat sensors", what's to stop you from being shot if someone aimed at something inanimate that you happened to be standing behind? How do the swords in Medieval World not harm that land's guests? If guests can't be hurt, why are they thrown into tables, the bar, etc. during a brawl? (We could argue that the robots were already going haywire at that point, but the technicians aren't shown being alarmed by this behavior.) How do they fix all of the architectural damage done every day? Where are all the other guests? Wouldn't it cost a lot more than $1000 per day per guest to make all of those repairs and perform routine maintenance on the robots?

That's just a small sampling of the questions you could worry about while watching the film, but that would be missing the point. Westworld isn't intended as a blueprint for actually constructing a Delos-like amusement park. The idea is to get the viewer to fantasize about the scenario, enjoy the more visceral, literal suspense story, and at the same time ponder some of the more philosophical questions and subtexts. On those accounts, Westworld greatly succeeds.

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