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Harry Stradling Jr., ‘The Way We Were’ Cinematographer, Dies at 92

Harry Stradling Jr., ‘The Way We Were’ Cinematographer, Dies at 92
Harry Stradling Jr., a two-time Academy Award-nominated cinematographer for “1776” and “The Way We Were,” died Oct. 17 at the Motion Picture Home in Woodland Hills, Calif. He was 92.

He was the son of cinematographer Harry Stradling, who has more than 130 credits to his name, including “A Streetcar Named Desire,” “The Picture of Dorian Gray,” and “My Fair Lady.” His great uncle was a cinematographer in the silent era, known for films starring Mary Pickford.

“Harry was a giant in the business,” Steven Poster, president of the Icg said in a statement. “Between him and his father, they spanned almost the entire history of motion picture industry before the end of last century. I first remember his name from watching ‘Gunsmoke’ as a kid. When I first met him, it was like meeting a star, and I will never forget that.”

During his prolific film career, Stradling Jr. worked heavily in Westerns, including cinematography
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Harry Stradling Jr. Dies: ‘The Way We Were’ Cinematographer Was 92

Harry Stradling Jr., the cinematographer behind the lens of The Way We Were, Little Big Man, 1776 and numerous episodes of Gunsmoke, among many others, died October 17 at the Motion Picture Home in Woodland Hills. He was 92. Steven Poster, President of the International Cinematographers Guild, called Stradling Jr. “a senior spokesperson for this industry.” “I grew up seeing his name on Gunsmoke,” said Poster. “He shot so many wonderful movies. He just had a quality about…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Harry Stradling Jr. Dies: ‘The Way We Were’ Cinematographer Was 92

Harry Stradling Jr. Dies: ‘The Way We Were’ Cinematographer Was 92
Harry Stradling Jr., the cinematographer behind the lens of The Way We Were, Little Big Man, 1776 and numerous episodes of Gunsmoke, among many others, died October 17 at the Motion Picture Home in Woodland Hills. He was 92. Steven Poster, President of the International Cinematographers Guild, called Stradling Jr. “a senior spokesperson for this industry.” “I grew up seeing his name on Gunsmoke,” said Poster. “He shot so many wonderful movies. He just had a quality about…
See full article at Deadline »

Famed Cinematographer Harry Stradling Jr. Dies at 92

Harry Stradling Jr., the two-time Oscar-nominated cinematographer who shot such films as Little Big Man, The Way We Were, 1776 and Rooster Cogburn, has died. He was 92.

Stradling Jr. died Oct. 17 at the Motion Picture Home in Woodland Hills, his son, John, told The Hollywood Reporter.

He was the son of another acclaimed director of photography, Harry Stradling Sr., who won Academy Awards for The Picture of Dorian Gray and My Fair Lady and was nominated a dozen other times (for A Streetcar Named Desire, Guys and Dolls, Funny Girl, etc.).

Stradling Jr., though, certainly carved out a...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Famed Cinematographer Harry Stradling Jr. Dies at 92

Famed Cinematographer Harry Stradling Jr. Dies at 92
Harry Stradling Jr., the two-time Oscar-nominated cinematographer who shot such films as Little Big Man, The Way We Were, 1776 and Rooster Cogburn, has died. He was 92.

Stradling Jr. died Oct. 17 at the Motion Picture Home in Woodland Hills, his son, John, told The Hollywood Reporter.

He was the son of another acclaimed director of photography, Harry Stradling Sr., who won Academy Awards for The Picture of Dorian Gray and My Fair Lady and was nominated a dozen other times (for A Streetcar Named Desire, Guys and Dolls, Funny Girl, etc.).

Stradling Jr., though, certainly carved out a...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Book Review: "Starring The Plaza" By Patty Farmer; Foreword By Mitzi Gaynor

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

“Starring the Plaza” by Patty Farmer (Beaufort Books, Hardback, Illustrated, 130 pages Isbn#: 0825308461)

One of New York’s biggest film stars isn’t even a person…it’s The Plaza, the legendary hotel on Central Park where numerous classic movies have been shot. Author Patty Farmer reverently captures the allure of the fabled place in her new book “Starring the Plaza”, which pays tribute to one of Gotham’s truly grand dames (she dates back to 1907). Cinematically, some celluloid gems stand out in our minds: Cary Grant being kidnapped there in North By Northwest, Streisand and Redford as briefly reunited former lovers outside the hotel in The Way We Were and Walter Matthau starring in numerous Neil Simon comedy skits in Plaza Suite. The wonderful anecdotes are accompanied by 180 photos, making this an irresistible addition to any movie lover’s book collection.

Here is the official press
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Barbra Streisand and Yvonne Rainer Film Retrospectives Announced

Barbra Streisand in “Funny Girl”: Silver Screen Collection

Film retrospectives will honor two icons of the stage and screen this summer in New York City. An exhibition celebrating Oscar-winning actress and singer Barbra Streisand, called “Simply Streisand,” will be held June 30-July 6 at the Quad Cinema. “Talking Pictures: The Cinema of Yvonne Rainer,” will feature screenings of the dancer, choreographer, and director’s work July 21–27 at the Film Society of Lincoln Center (Fslc).

“Simply Streisand” is a collection of Streisand’s “evergreen big-screen work” in honor of the legend’s 75th birthday. Streisand made her feature film debut at age 20 in “Funny Girl.” She won a Golden Globe and Oscar for the role of Fanny Brice. “Streisand’s screen presence was larger-than-life,” a press release details. “Her breathtaking singing voice and extraordinary comic chops turned a series musicals and comedies into smash hits.”

Streisand-led films like “Funny Girl,” “A Star Is Born,” “The Way We Were,” and “Hello, Dolly!” will screen at the retrospective. “The Mirror Has Two Faces,” “Yentl,” and “The Prince of Tides” — all helmed by Streisand — will also be shown.

Opening up about her lack of Best Director Oscar nods, Streisand recently said, “There were a lot of older people [voting]. They don’t want to see a woman director. I don’t know how many women wanted to see a woman director.” She added, “I directed because I couldn’t be heard.”

Check out the Quad’s website for “Simply Streisand’s” full schedule.

“Talking Pictures” will screen the radical work of Rainer, who completed her first film in 1972. Her “cinema signaled new possibilities for film language, retooling narrative generally and melodrama specifically with a disjunctive audiovisual syntax, restless political intelligence, deft appropriation, and deadpan wit,” a press release summarizes.

Rainer herself will attend the retrospective to discuss her career and work with writer Lynne Tillman. Their conversation will serve as the centerpiece of the film series.

All of the films Rainer directed — such as “Lives of Performers,” “Privilege,” and “Film About a Woman Who…” — will screen. Films that feature Rainer as subject and those that influenced her own filmmaking style will also be included. Among them are “Paul Swan” and “Madame X: An Absolute Ruler.”

Visit the Fslc website for the entire schedule and lineup for “Talking Pictures.”

Barbra Streisand and Yvonne Rainer Film Retrospectives Announced was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Quantico Season 2 Finale: Ep Talks Alternate Ending, Skipped Kiss, Nixed Cameo by Supergirl Star and More

Quantico Season 2 Finale: Ep Talks Alternate Ending, Skipped Kiss, Nixed Cameo by Supergirl Star and More
Weeks ago, Quantico creator Joshua Safran told TVLine that the ABC spy drama had shot an ending that he’d cut if word of the show’s renewal hit before the finale aired.

As it turned out, though, the scene was gone long before news of the Season 3 pickup — and Safran’s stepping down as showrunner — broke Monday evening.

RelatedFall TV Schedule 2017: What’s on When? And Versus What?

The final moments that aired found Alex going on the FBI/CIA-sanctioned lam after breaking the law in order to bring crooked President Roarke’s collaborator scheme to light. As
See full article at TVLine.com »

Tribeca Talks – A fascinating evening with Barbra Streisand with Robert Rodriguez

  • HeyUGuys
Author: James Kleinmann

Saturday evening in New York saw the unlikely pairing of filmmaker Robert Rodriguez and the iconic Barbra Streisand take to the stage at the 16th Tribeca Film Festival for a memorable discussion as part of the Tribeca Talks series.

Rodriguez immediately addressed how the improbable duo came about, revealing that Streisand was the most adored star in his household when he was growing up. When she became the first woman to write, direct, produce and star in a major American movie with Yentil, he was inspired as a budding young filmmaker and his five sisters felt empowered.

Rodriguez shared: “It speaks volumes about the widespread appeal of Barbra Streisand. I grew up in a large Hispanic family of 10 kids in San Antonio, Texas, and in our household, there simply was no bigger star than Barbra Streisand.”

When he finally met Streisand as an adult, he says he
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Barbra Streisand Started Directing Because She “Couldn’t Be Heard”

Barbra Streisand in “The Guilt Trip”: Paramount Pictures

Barbra Streisand didn’t mince words when Robert Rodriguez interviewed her at the Tribeca Film Festival this past weekend —of course, we wouldn’t have it any other way. The famously outspoken megastar had some choice words about how women directors are treated in Hollywood and how little things have changed since she made her own directorial debut with 1983’s “Yentl,” a story about a woman (Streisand) posing as a man in order to study the Torah.

According to Variety, Streisand spoke candidly about her lack of directing Oscar nods for “Yentl” and 1991’s “Prince of Tides.” She believes sexism from both men and women stopped her from receiving recognition from the Academy. “There were a lot of older people. They don’t want to see a woman director,” she told Rodriguez. “I don’t know how many women wanted to see a woman director.”

Streisand’s lack of directing nominations does seem like a blatant snub, as both “Yentl” and the romance “Prince of Tides” racked up a bunch of other nods. “Prince of Tides” in particular was nominated for seven Oscars, including Best Picture and Best Adapted Screenplay, which often go hand-in-hand with a directing nod.

As Streisand revealed, her work on Sydney Pollack’s 1973 romantic drama “The Way We Were” was the catalyst for her directing career. She disagreed with Pollack’s vision and was “horrified” when he cut “scenes that [Streisand] felt illustrated why her on-screen relationship with Robert Redford’s character ultimately disintegrated,” Variety details. Her lack of creative control is what drove her to helm her own movies.

“I directed because I couldn’t be heard,” Streisand emphasized.

While she wouldn’t be credited as a director until 1983, Streisand first demonstrated her artistic vision on the 1976 drama “A Star Is Born.” The film, which sees Streisand as a rising music star in a doomed relationship with past-his-prime rock star Kris Kristofferson, was directed by Frank Pierson. But Streisand told Rodriguez that she had the final cut. “That was tough because I was blackmailed into hiring [Pierson],” she said, per Deadline. “I hired him to write and he said he wouldn’t do it unless he directed. I had final cut rights. I told him he could have all the credit, but that he had to allow my vision to be there. He would agree, but then I’d show up and the cameras would be in [the wrong places].”

The “Funny Girl” star also brushed off Rodriguez’s suggestion that her work as a director “shattered a glass ceiling for other female filmmakers,” Variety notes. Acknowledging how few opportunities female directors receive in Hollywood, Streisand responded, “Not enough women are directing now.” In other words, the glass ceiling might have a crack or two, but it’s still very much intact.

Among Streisand’s other directing credits are the 1996 feature “The Mirror Has Two Faces” and three documentaries of her concert performances. She is also set to direct an untitled film about the affair between photographer Margaret Bourke-White and author Erskine Caldwell. She has received two Oscars: one for her performance in “Funny Girl” and another for Best Original Song for “A Star Is Born.”

Fittingly, Streisand was the person who presented Kathryn Bigelow the Oscar for Best Director in 2010 for “The Hurt Locker.” After opening the envelope with the winner’s name, Streisand said, “Well, the time has come,” in reference to the fact that a woman had never received the award before. To date, Bigelow remains the only woman to have won the Academy Award for Best Director.

Streisand was last seen in Anne Fletcher’s 2012 mother-son comedy “The Guilt Trip.”

Barbra Streisand Started Directing Because She “Couldn’t Be Heard” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Barbra Streisand Talks Filmmaking, Music & ‘A Star Is Born’ Clashes – Tribeca

Barbra Streisand Talks Filmmaking, Music & ‘A Star Is Born’ Clashes – Tribeca
In a wide-ranging conversation Saturday at the Tribeca Film Festival, Barbra Streisand touched on topics such as filmmaking, music, her less-than-happy childhood and the initially fruitless pursuit of acting which lead her to take up singing. The session was moderated by her friend, director Robert Rodriguez. Streisand, winner of two Academy Awards, 10 Grammys, five Emmys, a Tony and even the Presidential Medal of Freedom, said her work on The Way We Were, the 1973 film…
See full article at Deadline »

Barbra Streisand: Sexism Cost Me Multiple Oscar Nominations

Barbra Streisand: Sexism Cost Me Multiple Oscar Nominations
Barbra Streisand argued that sexism cost her Oscar nominations for “Yentl” and “The Prince of Tides” during a spirited public interview at the Tribeca Film Festival on Saturday. But it wasn’t just men who balked at the idea of a woman calling the shots on a major motion picture.

“There were a lot of older people,” Streisand told her interlocutor Robert Rodriguez. “They don’t want to see a woman director.”

“I don’t know how many women wanted to see a woman director,” she added.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Barbra Streisand and Robert Rodriguez Rally Against Hollywood Sexism in Lively Q&A

Barbra Streisand and Robert Rodriguez Rally Against Hollywood Sexism in Lively Q&A
One of Barbra Streisand’s simplest comments during her April 29 Tribeca Talk struck the hardest: “I love when I see a woman’s name on a movie, and I pray it’s good.” The determined hope of her sentiment came deep into a 70-minute conversation with industry friend (and superfan) Robert Rodriguez, which primarily focused on the multihyphenate’s time behind the camera.

Read More: Barbra Streisand to Receive 2015 Sherry Lansing Award

Rodriguez had been making the case that Streisand’s directing career paved the way for Kathryn Bigelow’s historic 2010 Best Director Oscar win for “The Hurt Locker,” the first ever for a woman. Streisand was hesitant to take credit, but after their discussion, it was hard to dispute that she paved the way for women to take control in a notoriously sexist industry, with Rodriguez arguing several times that she was robbed of Best Director nods for smash
See full article at Indiewire »

Call of Duty Trailer Impression: Anyone Else Still Burned Out On WWII?

  • Cinelinx
The new Call of Duty is stepping back into World War II and the first trailer leaves us with some impressions worth noting.

I don’t know about others, but I remember an age when almost every single shooter that released had something to do with WWII. We had Medal of Honor and Call of Duty doing it, then everyone else trying to jump in and grab some of the pie. Whenever games ventured off and did something more “modern” it always felt like a gem, and then Modern Warfare released which changed the game entirely.

While WWII games have been on the back burner for about a generation, I feel like if we are jumping back into that pool then it’s still too soon. I don’t mind a WWII game here and there, but if the whole industry is going to go there I will quickly get annoyed.
See full article at Cinelinx »

Richard A. Roth, Producer of 'Summer of '42' and 'Sherlock Holmes' Smarter Brother,' Dies at 76

Richard A. Roth, who produced such films as the coming-of-age classic Summer of '42 and the Gene Wilder comedy The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes' Smarter Brother, has died. He was 76.

Roth died March 17 of natural causes at his home in New York City, his family announced.

He should not be confused with another producer named Richard Roth; that one earned an Oscar nomination for Julia and also produced other films including Blue Velvet and The Way We Were.

Richard A. Roth was working for a small literary agency when he happened on the screenplay for Summer...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

What Movie Makes Emma Stone, Viola Davis and Nicole Kidman Cry?

From Moonlight and Lion to Manchester By the Sea, this year’s crop of Oscar films is sure to make you shed a tear.

But what movies can make even an Oscar nominee cry? Turns out, almost all of them. This week, the female nominees sat down with People for an exclusive photo portfolio and video interviews. They dished on which films give them the feels while participating in The Cagle Exercise with People and Entertainment Weekly Editorial Director Jess Cagle.

“This is tough ’cause there’s a lot,” said Nicole Kidman.

Both Naomie Harris and Emma Stone agreed, with
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Yakuza

The Yakuza

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1975 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 112 & 123 min. / Street Date February 14, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring Robert Mitchum, Takakura Ken, Brian Keith, Eiji Okada, Richard Jordan, Keiko Kishi, James Shigeta, Herb Edelman.

Cinematography: Kozo Okazaki, Duke Callaghan

Production Design: Stephen Grimes

Art Direction: Yoshiyuki Ishida

Film Editor: Don Guidice, Thomas Stanford

Original Music: Dave Grusin

Written by: Leonard Schrader, Paul Schrader, Robert Towne

Produced by: Michael Hamilburg, Sydney Pollack, Koji Shundo

Directed by Sydney Pollack

The Warner Archive Collection is on a roll with a 2017 schedule that has so far released one much-desired library Blu-ray per week. Coming shortly are Vincente Minnelli’s Bells are Ringing, Billy Wilder’s Love in the Afternoon Ken Russell’s The Boy Friend and Val Guest’s When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth, and that only takes us through February. First up is a piercing action drama from 1975.

There are favorite movies around Savant central,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Oscars: How Often Do Films Win Both Best Original Song and Best Original Score?

La La Land’ (Courtesy: Dale Robinette/Lionsgate)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

La La Land is a force to be reckoned with this year — with a potential best picture win being the cherry on top — but just how well it will actually win at the Oscars remains to be seen. Most critics consider the Damien Chazelle-directed film to be leading the pack in numerous categories and, with it being a musical, two of those areas are the best original song and best original score. Is there a chance, according to history, that La La Land can sweep both honors?

The buzzy flick — starring Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone as jazz pianist Sebastian and aspiring actress Mia, two wannabe stars in L.A. who fall in love on their quest for stardom — features music composed by Justin Hurwitz with lyrics by Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, save for one song,
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Barbra Streisand Looks Incredible, Poses Pantsless in Sexy New Photos

Barbra Streisand Looks Incredible, Poses Pantsless in Sexy New Photos
Barbra Streisand has our attention!

At age 74, the triple-threat star poses for the December issue of W magazine in a series of seriously sexy photos. On the cover of the publication, Streisand wears only a white button-down shirt, black tie, sheer black pantyhose and high heels, while seated on the edge of a stool with her legs crossed.

In another image, the two-time Oscar winner sports a short shirt and long jacket -- sans pants -- that she pairs with thigh-high boots and a cowboy hat. Needless to say, Streisand pulls off both these jaw-dropping looks.

Watch: Barbra Streisand Returns to Tonys Stage After 46 Years to Help Hamilton Close the Show in Epic Fashion

In addition to the striking photos, Streisand also opens up to W about the men in her life, including her Hollywood crush and her husband of 18 years, James Brolin.

Even after all these years, she admits that her Hollywood crush is still [link=nm
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Marvin Hamlisch's Big Oscar Haul. And Other Stories...

On this day in history as it relates to the movies...

Dr Duran Duran and the Orgasmatron

1835 P.T. Barnum and his circus begin their first tour of the Us. Wasn't Hugh Jackman supposed to play him in an original movie musical? Is that still on or did the endless Wolverine show derail it? (sigh)

1840 Novelist Thomas Hardy is born. Movies adapted from his work include multiple versions of Jude, Tess,  and Far From the Madding Crowd

1904 Johnny Weissmuller is born. We just wrote about Tarzan and His Mate (1934) which you should definitely see

1926 Character actor Milo O'Shea, aka Dr Duran Duran who tried to kill Jane Fonda by excessive pleasure in Barbarella, is born.

1937 Sally Kellerman, the original " 'Hot Lips' O'Houlihan" is born

1944 Egot composing legend Marvin Hamlisch (of "A Chorus Line") fame is born...or as Cher calls him "Marvin Hamilsmisch". Classic songs include the Oscar winning "The Way We Were
See full article at FilmExperience »
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