Ultimo tango a Parigi
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Last Tango in Paris (1972) More at IMDbPro »Ultimo tango a Parigi (original title)


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

10 items from 2014


Under The Skin – The Review

18 April 2014 8:00 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

So this weekend we’ve seen Jude Law take a walk on the wild side in the title role of Dom Hemingway. Now, we also get a new film starring a stateside screen beauty, Scarlett Johansson as she takes a walk on the weird side. Very weird. She stars in almost every minute of  Under The Skin from director Jonathon Glazer who gave us the enormously entertaining Sexy Beast (Ben Kingley’s character might have been “mates” with Dom!). But Skin is no look at the cockney criminal class. This film is based on a 2000 science fiction novel from Michel Faber. Now we’re used to seeing Ms. J dashing about in CG backdrops in big budget blockbusters like Michael Bay’s The Island  and over at Marvel Studios as the sublime Shield agent the Black Widow in, so far, three epics. But this film’s not in the same »

- Jim Batts

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Last Tango in Halifax to get remake on French television

9 April 2014 8:31 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - TV news news »

BBC One's Last Tango in Halifax is to be remade for French television.

The romantic drama will be adapted by BBC Worldwide and production company Newen.

Derek Jacobi and Anne Reid star in the original UK series as childhood sweethearts who reunite after six decades apart.

Jean-Louis Blot, Director BBC Worldwide France, said: "We are excited to work with Newen teams to develop and co-produce Last Tango in Halifax. This is the beginning of a collaboration we hope long and successful."

Last Tango in Halifax was originally named in reference to 1972 film Last Tango in Paris, furthering its French connection.

The UK show has aired two series since it launched in November 2012, with a third currently in the works.

Luther: Idris Elba cop drama to be remade for Russian television

Watch clips from Last Tango in Halifax's most recent episode below: »

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Scripted TV Competition Builds With Packed Summer Schedule

27 March 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Looks like the DVR won’t be getting that much-needed summer vacation.

Not every network has released their summer skeds just yet, but it’s clear that there will be an unprecedented number of scripted skeins on the broadcast networks from June through August. And of course, cable networks have long seen the warm-weather months as a time for its originals to shine.

Six Feet Under,” “Monk” and “The Closer” are examples of cable shows that thrived out of the box in part because of a dirth of competition during summer. Those bowing this summer won’t have that luxury.

TNT alone will be airing nine original dramas this summer — the most ever for any network — including new projects from Steven Bochco, Michael Bay and the producers of “Homeland.”

After some rough starts in the ratings for shows that premiered in the thick of the broadcast season, TNT has switched »

- Rick Kissell

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Appetites: Surveying Paul Verhoeven

1 March 2014 9:21 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Paul Verhoeven filmography screens at the Tiff Bell Lightbox through April 4th, culminating in a screening of his new “crowdsourced” film, Tricked.

Common wisdom dictates that cynicism and sentimentality are carefully linked, if not outright synonymous. In filmic terms, the most comfortable formulation of that argument is to align, for instance, romantic comedies with socially-acceptable (and, often, utterly noxious) notions of gender politics. Through the deployment of relationships and character profiles that support popular notions of how women and men behave, these movies are able to exploit comfortable mores in order to mainline easy pathos. What’s less common is to consider how that relationship between affect and effect can be subverted, perhaps because it’s relatively rare for truly subversive artists to be handed the proverbial keys to the kingdom.

Enter Paul Verhoeven. From his early Dutch features, including Turks Fruit (Turkish Delight) and Soldaat van Oranje (Soldier of Orange »

- Simon Howell

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The greatest Best Actor race? Where does this year's class rank in Oscar history?

24 February 2014 3:20 PM, PST | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

This year’s Best Actor race is shaping up to be one of the greatest of all time. And by greatest, I mean both the most competitive and also the most outstanding, in the sense that each nominee is excellent — hypothetical winners in almost any other year. They also reflect the depth of superb male performances in 2013. Consider: Tom Hanks (Captain Phillips), Robert Redford (All Is Lost), Joaquin Phoneix (Her), Oscar Isaac (Inside Llewyn Davis), and Michael B. Jordan (Fruitvale Station) all missed the cut.

EW’s Owen Gleiberman recently analyzed this year’s Best Actor race, calling it the most “fiercely, »

- Jeff Labrecque

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My Favourite Movie: Cold Comes the Night's Alice Eve and Stealing Beauty

21 February 2014 1:30 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Alice Eve might be best known for her roles in Star Trek Into Darkness and Starter for 10, but speaking to the Brit actress for the home release of drama Cold Comes the Night one thing stands out: she really knows her movies.

The latest star to volunteer a choice for our ongoing My Favourite Movie series, Eve picked a film from Last Tango in Paris director Bernardo Bertolucci.

"I love everything about Stealing Beauty," she told Digital Spy. "There's a dysfunctional family, a cross-generational relationship, the loss of innocence, and the stamp the loss of innocence puts on you for the rest of your life."

Bertolucci's 1996 film starred Liv Tyler as an American girl who heads to the Tuscan countryside after the death of her mother. Seeking to uncover the identity of her father and lose her virginity to a boy she met four years earlier, Stealing Beauty has »

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Guy Lodge's DVDs and downloads

15 February 2014 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Cate Blanchett shines as a woman on the verge in Woody Allen's Blue Jasmine, while elsewhere Alec Baldwin disappoints

With apologies to Dylan Farrow, who would attach sterner moral implications to this question than those I intend: what's your favourite Woody Allen movie of the 21st century? It's been a slightly painful question for a while now, usually drawing less-than-ringing endorsements along the lines of: "Midnight in Paris was harmless enough", or: "Vicky Cristina Barcelona, if you mute the voiceover bits." At last, however, there's an easy answer: Blue Jasmine (Warner, 12), imperfect as it is in fractious and interesting ways, is something genuinely remarkable.

Much of that comes down to Cate Blanchett's daring, last-nerve performance as the title character, a spoilt society wife experiencing the mother of all Xanax comedowns after her husband is jailed for tax fraud – a tragicomic turn of Gena Rowlands proportions that is all »

- Guy Lodge

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How ‘A Clockwork Orange’ Author Anthony Burgess Soured on Stanley Kubrick (Book Excerpt)

4 February 2014 1:53 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

The years 1968 to 1973 saw the release of such seminal taboo-busting films as “Midnight Cowboy,” “Barbarella,” “If…,” “Women in Love,” “The Damned,” “Trash,” “Sunday Bloody Sunday,” “Carnal Knowledge,” “Performance,” “The Devils,” “Straw Dogs,” “Last Tango in Paris,” “Deep Throat” and, of course, “A Clockwork Orange.” In this excerpt, Malcolm McDowell confronts a skittish Anthony Burgess while the two men do press chores for “A Clockwork Orange” — and Stanley Kubrick stays behind in England “controlling everything.” “Sexplosion” goes on sale today. *   *   * Anthony Burgess, author of “A Clockwork Orange,” harbored doubts about Stanley Kubrick’s screen adaptation of his »

- Robert Hofler

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8 Actors We Never Expected To Make Huge Comebacks

24 January 2014 12:37 PM, PST | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Focus Features

The movie business is tough. One slip-up can cost major movie stars their career, and only very rarely does Hollywood allow for second chances. There are all kinds of reasons why actors have fallen by the wayside – often, they’ve just failed to make shrewd choices when picking projects, or they didn’t play the Tinseltown politics to their advantage.

But sometimes, even the actor you assumed least likely to find themselves back in favour manage to make comebacks. Take Marlon Brando, for example – arguably the biggest movie star in the world in the 50s, Brando had become box office poison by the late 60s. Worse still, he had built a reputation as a diva; hardly anybody wanted to work with him.

The came The Godfather and Last Tango in Paris in 1972 and Brando, whom seemingly everyone but Francis Ford Coppola and Bernardo Bertolucci had written off, was suddenly back on top. »

- Brogan Morris

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10 Relentlessly Morbid Films

11 January 2014 9:03 AM, PST | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Magnolia Pictures

Morbid movies have been a feature of cinema from its earliest days, with films such as Nosferatu, Un Chien Andalou, L’age d’or and The Cabinet of Dr Caligari. They were frowned upon by our moral guardians for being unwholesome, but it didn’t stop their proliferation down the decades. By the 1960s, many taboos of cinema – like nudity, gore and graphic sex – had been busted wide open, leaving filmmakers all over the world free to engage in an all manner of previously off-limits subjects.

The 1970s were flooded with morbid films, though – Straw Dogs, The Devils, Last Tango in Paris, Last House on the Left, and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (just to name a few). These films gave the censors the run around, but they set a precedent for subsequent writers and directors to attain new heights of ghoulishness. There are no sacred cows left today »

- Clare Simpson

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

10 items from 2014


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