The Sting
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb


News for
The Sting (1973) More at IMDbPro »


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000

18 items from 2015


"Woods" Was Going To Be Redford & Newman

1 September 2015 5:44 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Filmmaker Ken Kwapis has revealed that the upcoming Robert Redford and Nick Nolte drama "A Walk In The Woods" was originally going to feature an on-screen reunion between "Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid" and "The Sting" stars Redford and Paul Newman.

Redford has been planning this adaptation of the 1998 for a decade, but Newman's death in 2008 led Robert Redford to shelve the project for sometime. Four years later, Redford cast Nick Nolte in "The Company You Keep" and the pair finally got to work together for an extended period of time.

They clicked, and as a result Redford decided to proceed with "A Walk In The Woods" again. Kwapis tells Cinema Blend:

"They had never worked together before. And although their paths probably crossed over the years they didn't really know each other. So they worked on that film. They only had a few scenes together but they got on splendidly. »

- Garth Franklin

Permalink | Report a problem


A Walk In The Woods Would Have Starred Paul Newman

31 August 2015 3:59 PM, PDT | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

Paul Newman and Robert Redford on-screen efforts in Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid and The Sting are rightfully regarded as two of the best dual leading performances in the history of cinema. And it turns out that we almost got a third film with the pair of acting titans, because Robert Redford originally planned for Paul Newman to star opposite him in A Walk In The Woods. While recently talking with director Ken Kwapis ahead of A Walk In The Woods. theatrical release this Wednesday, the filmmaker revealed that the death of Paul Newman in September 2008, at the age of 83, led Robert Redford to "shelve the project for a while." Kwapis explained, He couldn.t imagine doing it with anyone else. He.d developed it as a vehicle for Paul and himself. But Redford.s interest in the adaptation of A Walk In The Woods was soon rejuvenated when »

Permalink | Report a problem


‘A Walk In The Woods’ Review: Robert Redford & Nick Nolte Hit The Trail For Laughs

31 August 2015 1:54 PM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

After having two smash hits together — Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid (1968) and The Sting (1973) — Robert Redford and Paul Newman had often talked about reteaming but waited decades to finally find the right property. Redford, with his producer’s hat on, thought he had found it in the 1998 Bill Bryson book A Walk In The Woods, which chronicles the late-in-life hike Bryson took on with a friend named Stephen Katz  along the 2200-mile Appalachian Trail. Unfortunately… »

Permalink | Report a problem


Every Day I'm Hustling: Film’s 10 most memorable con artists

18 August 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

Twenty years ago today, Bryan Singer, the director of the “good X-Men movies” (read: all of them except X3), and writer Christopher McQuarrie (Mission: Impossible – Rogue One) rounded up five thieves for the heist of the 90’s. It all starts out with a seemingly harmless lineup, but Keyser Söze – bogeyman of the criminal underworld – has very specific (and sinister) plans for The Usual SuspectsDean Keaton (Gabriel Byrne), McManus (Stephen Baldwin), Fenster (Benicio del Toro), Hockney (Kevin Pollak), and Verbal Kint (Kevin Spacey).  Bonus points to Singer for casting Giancarlo Esposito (“Breaking Bad”’s Gus Fring), who looks ridiculously young as one of the FBI agents after Keyser Söze.

From pool sharks and grifters to tricksters, card cheats and American hustlers, here’s our rundown of the most memorable con artists in movie history.

Warning: Spoilers ahead.

 

Fast Eddie Felson – The Hustler (1961)

One of the finest fraudster films to ever »

- Daniel Bettridge

Permalink | Report a problem


Nerd Alert: Simon Pegg Ranks Star Wars and Amazing Movie Weapons

3 August 2015 9:23 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Welcome to today's edition of Nerd Alert, where we have all the quirky, nerdy news that you crave in one convenient spot. What do we have in store for you on this manic Monday? We have a letter written by a young Tom Hanks that proved he would be a star, a guide to the most incredible movie and TV weapons and Kyle Chandler returns as Coach Taylor from Friday Night Lights for a new PSA. But first, Simon Pegg ranks all of the Star Wars movies. So, sit back, relax and check out all that today's Nerd Alert has to offer.

Simon Pegg Ranks Every Star Wars Movie In One Minute

During LucasFilm's Hall H panel at Comic-Con last month, a behind-the-scenes video from Star Wars: The Force Awakens confirmed that Simon Pegg has some sort of role in the film. While promoting Mission: Impossible Rogue Nation, the »

- MovieWeb

Permalink | Report a problem


Road to audition: Tom Hanks letter begging to be 'discovered' unearthed

3 August 2015 7:31 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

High school student Hanks admits he is ‘not built like a Greek God’ but says he hopes to one day call Robert Redford ‘Bob’ in 1974 letter to George Roy Hill

A 1974 letter from a pre-fame, teenage Tom Hanks asking the Oscar-winning director of The Sting, George Roy Hill, to “discover” him has been unveiled by Hollywood archivists. In it, the high school student describes a number of scenarios via which he can achieve stardom, despite admitting that his “looks are not stunning” and he “cannot even grow a mustache”.

Two-time Oscar-winner Hanks wrote the letter as an 18-year-old at Skyline high school in Oakland, California. Hill, whose 1973 con artist caper starring Robert Redford and Paul Newman won seven Oscars, kept the letter and it was recently unveiled by the Margaret Herrick Library of the Motion Picture Academy in Beverly Hills.

Continue reading »

- Ben Child

Permalink | Report a problem


Teenage Tom Hanks Actually Predicted His Amazing A-List Career

28 July 2015 8:29 AM, PDT | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

Some of us dream of fame, some of us go after fame, and then there are those of us, like Tom Hanks, who know beyond a shadow of a doubt that they will become famous. From the age of 18, Hanks knew he was going to make it Big, and we have physical evidence to prove it. Before he became an A-lister, Hanks wrote a letter to George Roy Hill, director of such classics as Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and The Sting, and  in this letter he predicted his worldwide success.  As noted in a report by NPR, the Library of the Motion Picture Academy in Beverly Hills, California, features a letter Hanks wrote to the illustrious filmmaker in response to watching The Sting. While he praises Hills.s work, the purpose of this letter is to give him a heads up that he.s going to be a »

Permalink | Report a problem


Every Best Picture Oscar Winner, Ranked From Worst to Best

6 May 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

This week marks the 10th anniversary of the release of "Crash" (on May 6, 2005), an all-star movie whose controversy came not from its provocative treatment of racial issues but from its Best Picture Oscar victory a few months later, against what many critics felt was a much more deserving movie, "Brokeback Mountain."

The "Crash" vs. "Brokeback" battle is one of those lingering disputes that makes the Academy Awards so fascinating, year after year. Moviegoers and critics who revisit older movies are constantly judging the Academy's judgment. Even decades of hindsight may not always be enough to tell whether the Oscar voters of a particular year got it right or wrong. Whether it's "Birdman" vs. "Boyhood," "The King's Speech" vs. "The Social Network," "Saving Private Ryan" vs. "Shakespeare in Love" or even "An American in Paris" vs. "A Streetcar Named Desire," we're still confirming the Academy's taste or dismissing it as hopelessly off-base years later. »

- Gary Susman

Permalink | Report a problem


Community season 6 episode 9 review: Grifting 101

5 May 2015 5:14 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Matt Berry is on fine form guest-starring as a vainglorious grifter in this week's Community, an homage to movie classic The Sting...

This review contains spoilers.

6.9 Grifting 101

Full-on parodies have been in short supply this season and it's with some gusto that the latest episode lampoons 1973's Best Picture winner The Sting. Like the movie and the episode itself, this review will be about 20% hand-drawn. You should also probably play this in the background as you read...

Grifting 101 is the first episode of the season to find the students among our group - Abed, Annie, Britta, Chang and Elroy - actually going to class. Specifically, they're wound up about the titular class, where they expect to become master con-artists. Jeff is sceptical (and maybe a little jealous) which only spurs the group on further.

But when their double-dealing professor (played by the one and only Matt Berry) charges them $150 for »

- louisamellor

Permalink | Report a problem


Lincoln Center Chaplin Gala To Fete Robert Redford

24 April 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Has any contemporary movie star more intriguingly chafed at the gilded prison of stardom than Robert Redford? Certainly, he was not the first — or the last — matinee idol who endeavored to show us there was more to him than just a pretty face (or, in Redford’s particular case, that California tan, those blazing baby blues, and that wonderfully, ridiculously tousled hair).

Some actors, so inclined, stretch themselves in their choice of material; others add producing, directing, and even political activism to the mix. But “Bob” did all that and still felt somehow unfulfilled. So, rather like a fussy housewife forever rearranging the living room furniture, he gazed out at a sizable property he owned in the mountains of Utah and thought that an institute devoted to the cultivation and support of American independent filmmakers might look awfully nice over there.

If Sundance now seems nearly as iconic as Redford himself, »

- Scott Foundas

Permalink | Report a problem


The 9 Best Con Artist Movies to Watch After 'Focus'

1 March 2015 8:15 PM, PST | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

In Focus, Will Smith's first film since 2013, the superstar plays Nicky, a long-time conman who is planning his last big score, but ends up reuniting with a con woman who he trained years before.

The film, which performed mildly at the box office in its debut this weekend, joins the ranks of Hollywood's long love affair with the art of the con.

Video: Will Smith Is A Shirtless Con Man in Focus

In celebration of this newest entry in the grifter genre, here are nine of the best conman movies ever made.

(Note: This list doesn't include movies about heists that happen to involve conmen -- i.e. Ocean's Eleven or The Heist -- just films that celebrate the age of tradition of swindling.)

9. Matchstick Men (2003): Nicholas Cage and Sam Rockwell play con artists who are planning one of the biggest scams of their careers. Things get complicated when Cage's teenage daughter shows up and »

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: 'Focus'

27 February 2015 4:50 AM, PST | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★☆☆☆ Heist movies are meant to be sexy and slick, where the underdog comes out on top thanks to their cunning and skill. Immediately we think of the sparkling smile of Robert Redford in 1973's The Sting, the undeniable charm of Clooney's Danny Ocean or the tenacity of De Niro's Neil McCauley. However, with Glenn Ficarra and John Requa's Focus (2015), starring Will Smith as cock-sure conman, feels like a limp imitation. Focus glides along too comfortably, far more interested in the authenticity of the terminology and on the practicalities of street level swindles. It might be accurate, but it's at the expensive of structure and is too wrapped up in the idea of conning the audience, culminating in underwhelming grand reveal.

»

- CineVue UK

Permalink | Report a problem


Does American Cinema Editors prize for 'Boyhood' predict Oscar win on Sunday?

19 February 2015 7:35 PM, PST | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

It’s It's an oft-echoed sentiment that movies are made in the cutting room, so the Academy Award for Best Film Editing is a cherished trophy indeed. First, some guild award stats: since 1963, the American Cinema Editors have correctly predicted the eventual Oscar winner 36 times (in years when the award has been split between Dramatic and Musical/Comedy Editing, the specific prize given has been noted): 1963: Harold F. Kress, “How the West Was Won” 1964: Cotton Warburton, “Mary Poppins” 1965: William Reynolds, “The Sound of Music” 1968: Frank P. Keller, “Bullitt” 1970: Hugh S. Fowler, “Patton” 1972: David Bretherton, “Cabaret” 1973: William Reynolds, “The Sting” 1975: Verna Fields, “Jaws” 1976: Richard Halsley and Scott Conrad, “Rocky” 1978: Peter Zinner, “The Deer Hunter” 1979: Alan Heim, “All That Jazz” 1980: Thelma...' »

Permalink | Report a problem


Youthful Redford Immersed in Dirty World of Politics on TCM Tonight

27 January 2015 5:29 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Young Robert Redford and politics: 'The Candidate' and 'All the President's Men' (photo: Robert Redford as Bob Woodward in 'All the President's Men') A young Robert Redford can be seen The Candidate, All the President's Men, Three Days of the Condor, and Downhill Racer as Turner Classic Movies' Redford series comes to a close this evening. The world of politics is the focus of the first three films, each one of them well-regarded box-office hits. The last title, which shows that politics is part of life no matter what, is set in the world of competitive sports. 'The Candidate' In the Michael Ritichie-directed The Candidate (1972), Robert Redford plays idealistic liberal Democrat Bob McKay, who, with no chance of winning, is convinced to run against the Republican incumbent in a fight for a California seat in Congress. See, McKay is too handsome. Too young. Too liberal. »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Redford on TCM: Dismal 'Gatsby,' Oscar winner 'Africa'

20 January 2015 7:10 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Robert Redford: 'The Great Gatsby' and 'The Way We Were' tonight on Turner Classic Movies Turner Classic Movies' Star of the Month Robert Redford returns this evening with three more films: two Sydney Pollack-directed efforts, Out of Africa and The Way We Were, and Jack Clayton's film version of F. Scott Fitzgerald's classic novel The Great Gatsby. (See TCM's Robert Redford film schedule below. See also: "On TCM: Robert Redford Movies.") 'The Great Gatsby': Robert Redford as Jay Gatsby Released by Paramount Pictures, the 1974 film version of The Great Gatsby had prestige oozing from just about every cinematic pore. The film was based on what some consider the greatest American novel ever written. Francis Ford Coppola, whose directing credits included the blockbuster The Godfather, and who, that same year, was responsible for both The Godfather Part II and The Conversation, penned the adaptation. Multiple Tony winner David Merrick (Becket, »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Redford on TCM: Dismal 'Gatsby,' Oscar winner 'Africa'

20 January 2015 5:59 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Robert Redford: 'The Great Gatsby' and 'The Way We Were' tonight on Turner Classic Movies Turner Classic Movies' Star of the Month Robert Redford returns this evening with three more films: two Sydney Pollack-directed efforts, Out of Africa and The Way We Were, and Jack Clayton's film version of F. Scott Fitzgerald's classic novel The Great Gatsby. (See TCM's Robert Redford film schedule below. See also: "On TCM: Robert Redford Movies.") 'Out of Africa' Out of Africa (1985) is an unusual Robert Redford star vehicle in that the film's actual lead isn't Redford, but Meryl Streep -- at the time seen as sort of a Bette Davis-Alec Guinness mix: like Davis, Streep received a whole bunch of Academy Award nominations within the span of a few years: from 1978-1985, she was shortlisted for no less than six movies.* Like Guinness, Streep could transform »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Two of Redford's Biggest Box-Office Hits on TCM Tonight

6 January 2015 5:20 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Robert Redford movies: TCM shows 'Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,' 'The Sting' They don't make movie stars like they used to, back in the days of Louis B. Mayer, Jack Warner, and Harry Cohn. That's what nostalgists have been bitching about for the last four or five decades; never mind the fact that movie stars have remained as big as ever despite the demise of the old studio system and the spectacular rise of television more than sixty years ago. This month of January 2015, Turner Classic Movies will be honoring one such post-studio era superstar: Robert Redford. Beginning this Monday evening, January 6, TCM will be presenting 15 Robert Redford movies. Tonight's entries include Redford's two biggest blockbusters, both directed by George Roy Hill and co-starring Paul Newman: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, which turned Redford, already in his early 30s, into a major film star to rival Rudolph Valentino, »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


The Definitive Best Picture Losers

1 January 2015 12:22 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

#20. The Exorcist (1973)

Lost to: The Sting

Crammed in between two Best Picture wins for Francis Ford Coppola’s “Godfather” films was an interesting little year that rewarded another pairing of Robert Redford and Paul Newman (trivia: “The Sting’s” Julia Phillips is the first time female producer to ever win Best Picture). The other big landmark – the first time a purely horror film was nominated for Best Picture. “The Exorcist” was nominated for ten Oscars, winning for Sound and Adapted Screenplay. The horrifying story of a young girl possessed was, rumor has it, cursed as they tried to complete the film. This film about the struggle between faith and sin is possibly the most important horror film of all time.

#19. Avatar (2009)

Lost to: The Hurt Locker

The year after “The Dark Knight” and “Wall-e” missed out on Best Picture nominations, the Academy decided to change the rules and allow ten nominees. »

- Joshua Gaul

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000

18 items from 2015


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners