The Sting
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb


News for
The Sting (1973) More at IMDbPro »


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000

16 items from 2014


The Definitive Original Screenplays: 20-11

12 March 2014 3:29 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The top 20. The scripts by which all others are defined and to which all others are compared. Brilliant scripts can be wordy. Brilliant scripts can be confusing. Brilliant scripts can be sweeping or intimate. This section runs the gamut, ranging from first time writers to established writing vets. It only gets better from here.

courtesy of wikipedia.org

20. Easy Rider (1969)

Written by Dennis Hopper, Peter Fonda, and Terry Southern

They’ll talk to ya and talk to ya and talk to ya about individual freedom. But they see a free individual, it’s gonna scare ‘em.

This portion’s “anybody can write a film” segment comes from 1969, with a landmark film that truly doesn’t have much weight. A road movie if there ever was one, Easy Rider follows Wyatt (Peter Fonda) and Billy (Dennis Hopper) as they ride their motorcycles across the country to New Orleans for Mardi Gras. »

- Joshua Gaul

Permalink | Report a problem


Why American Hustle Should Win the Best Picture Oscar

25 February 2014 4:00 AM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Every day, from now until the weekend of the 2014 Academy Awards, HeyUGuys will be publishing an article championing one of the nine films in contention for the coveted Best Picture Oscar. We will be collecting them all here, where you can find the previous articles.

Today we turn our attention to David O. Russell’s latest, American Hustle, whose long con seduced many with its evocative, heightened 70s bewitchery. Oscars may indeed a certainty, but does it deserve the grand prize? Cai Ross makes the case…

American Hustle is a film about the intricate means by which we deceive and fictionalise our entire lives to no good end, and the rescue which honesty and truth can potentially bring. Not only is it the best film of last year, but it is also the final proof of the Electric Light Orchestra’s standing as a truly great soundtrack band – but that’s by the by and, »

- Cai Ross

Permalink | Report a problem


The greatest Best Actor race? Where does this year's class rank in Oscar history?

24 February 2014 3:20 PM, PST | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

This year’s Best Actor race is shaping up to be one of the greatest of all time. And by greatest, I mean both the most competitive and also the most outstanding, in the sense that each nominee is excellent — hypothetical winners in almost any other year. They also reflect the depth of superb male performances in 2013. Consider: Tom Hanks (Captain Phillips), Robert Redford (All Is Lost), Joaquin Phoneix (Her), Oscar Isaac (Inside Llewyn Davis), and Michael B. Jordan (Fruitvale Station) all missed the cut.

EW’s Owen Gleiberman recently analyzed this year’s Best Actor race, calling it the most “fiercely, »

- Jeff Labrecque

Permalink | Report a problem


George Clooney on the Epic Battle to Make ‘Monuments Men’

4 February 2014 6:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The walls of his rustic chic home, tucked away on a quiet wooded street in Studio City, are graced with framed black-and-white photographs of gorgeous leading men from a bygone era: Cary Grant, Clark Gable, Gregory Peck and Paul Newman, among them. In his living room, next to all the regal portraits, there is a snapshot of him and then-Sen. Barack Obama side by side at a 2006 Washington, D.C., press conference concerning the genocide in Darfur. The walls of George Clooney’s abode — once owned by Gable himself — speak volumes about the man who is at once a charismatic star craving legendary fame and someone who thinks beyond the borders of insular Hollywood.

Meet Citizen Clooney.

The 52-year-old actor-director-producer is among a small group of celebrities, including power couple Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, as well as Oprah, and Bono, who can shine a global camera on significant »

- Ramin Setoodeh

Permalink | Report a problem


Earliest Best Actor Oscar Winner Has Died

1 February 2014 6:52 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Maximilian Schell dead at 83: Best Actor Oscar winner for ‘Judgment at Nuremberg’ (photo: Maximilian Schell ca. 1960) Actor and filmmaker Maximilian Schell, best known for his Oscar-winning performance as the defense attorney in Stanley Kramer’s 1961 political drama Judgment at Nuremberg died at a hospital in Innsbruck, Austria, on February 1, 2014. According to his agent, Patricia Baumbauer, Schell died overnight following a "sudden and serious illness." Maximilian Schell was 83. Born on December 8, 1930, in Vienna, Maximilian Schell was the younger brother of future actor Carl Schell and Maria Schell, who would become an international film star in the 1950s (The Last Bridge, Gervaise, The Hanging Tree). Immy Schell, who would be featured in several television and film productions from the mid-’50s to the early ’90s, was born in 1935. Following Nazi Germany’s annexation of Austria in 1938, Schell’s parents, Swiss playwright Hermann Ferdinand Schell and Austrian stage actress Margarete Schell Noé, »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Much Ballyhooed Johansson Sets Winter Soldier on Fire

31 January 2014 5:40 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Captain America: The Winter Soldier’ poster (image: Scarlett Johansson as Black Widow in one of the character posters for ‘Captain America: The Winter Soldier’) Scarlett Johansson has created quite a bit of a stir in recent days. Yesterday, January 30, 2014, Captain America: The Winter Soldier posters came out, revealing Chris Evans as Captain America, Samuel L. Jackson as Nick Fury, and a tightly garbed Scarlett Johansson as a seductive, hair flowing in the wind, Black Widow. And like every good film noir heroine worth her makeup, she’s deadly, too; forget the cleavage, the lips, and the hips, and focus on those two guns. And there’s more. Let’s not forget Scarlett Johansson looking sultry in a 2014 Super Bowl ad plugging SodaStream, which went viral and created quite a bit of controversy, both of the tabloid and the political varieties. First, tongues wagged (and some drooled) because, gee, didn’t Johansson spice up soda pop? »

- Zac Gille

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscars 2014: the fine art of winning

25 January 2014 5:30 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

History hasn't always looked kindly on the Academy Awards, with classics often missing out and groundbreaking moments few and far between. We delve into the Oscars' chequered past – and assess this year's contenders

• Get in shape for the Oscars with Mark Kermode's month-long feast of film here

There are only two things you really need to know about the Academy Awards: that Citizen Kane didn't win the Oscar for best picture, and that Driving Miss Daisy did.

As we approach the 86th Academy Awards, it's worth remembering those two sobering facts, which perfectly encapsulate the inherent foolishness of gong ceremonies in general, and the Oscars in particular. Ask any film fan how seriously you should take the Academy Awards, and chances are they will point you toward the best director category, where the roll call of winners signally omits Charlie Chaplin, Orson Welles, Howard Hawks, Stanley Kubrick, Jane Campion, »

- Mark Kermode

Permalink | Report a problem


Scott Joplin's ragtime gets its dues

22 January 2014 7:30 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

1973's The Sting took it global, but there's more to ragtime music than that film's Keystone Kops crazy-chase soundtrack

Reading on mobile? Click here to listen to The Maple Leaf Rag played by Scott Joplin

One album was all it took to herald a revival. In 1970, the year of Simon & Garfunkel's Bridge Over Troubled Water and The Beatles' Let It Be, a record of arcane late 19th-century American piano music, released on a label that was otherwise building its reputation as a chronicler of the hardcore American avant-garde, began to sell in implausible quantities. Audiences ordinarily enamoured of piano miniatures by Chopin, Brahms and Liszt were suddenly taking pleasure in the compositions of Scott Joplin, the Texas-born "King of Ragtime" whose über-catchy 1899 Maple Leaf Rag brought him immediate popularity, but who died in 1917 with two typically embarrassing composerly problems hanging over him: syphilis and a terminally unproduced opera, Treemonisha, »

Permalink | Report a problem


Robert Redford dusts off Oscar snub, but wishes distributors had done more

16 January 2014 1:57 PM, PST | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

Robert Redford appeared before the press Thursday to discuss the Sundance Film Festival, but it was impossible to ignore the news that he’d been snubbed by the Academy, which overlooked his acting performance in All is Lost. Speaking at the festival’s Day 1 press conference, Redford insisted he wasn’t disturbed or upset by the slight, but he expressed regret that the film’s distributors, Lionsgate and Roadside Attractions, did not do more to champion the film’s award prospects. “When these films go before to be voted on, usually they’re heavily dependent on campaigns that the distributors provide, »

- Jeff Labrecque

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscars: 15 Biggest Snubs and Surprises

16 January 2014 7:42 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The bad news from having such a great year at the movies is the inevitable disappointments on Oscar nominations morning–there wasn’t enough room for everybody.

But Thursday morning’s nomination announcement was especially tough on the legends. No Oprah Winfrey for “The Butler”? No Emma Thompson for “Saving Mr. Banks”? No Robert Redford in “All Is Lost”? No Tom Hanks in “Captain Phillips”? And no posthumous nomination for James Gandolfini in “Enough Said”?

Oscars: Complete List of Nominees

The Academy forgot to nominate some of its most Academy-friendly stars, which speaks to a shifting tide in an organization trying to become younger and hipper. At least Leonardo DiCaprio, for once, wasn’t left off the Oscars list for “The Wolf of Wall Street.” And Harvey Weinstein managed to keep his best picture streak alive–he’s been nominated in the category every year since 2008’s “The Reader”–by sneaking in “Philomena. »

- Ramin Setoodeh

Permalink | Report a problem


Potential Nominees Who Are Overdue for Oscar Wins

14 January 2014 10:49 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Mark Pinkert

Contributor

One of the most popular Oscar hopefuls this year is Bruce Dern, who has gotten a lot of love from critics and from his peers for a great performance in Alexander Payne’s Nebraska. But, other than the role itself, what has made his story so special is that he’s had an extremely prolific film career–mostly as a supporting actor–and is finally getting Oscar recognition for the first time at the age of 77.  (Dern did get nominated for Best Supporting Actor thirty-five years ago for Coming Home (1978).) Even getting a nomination, though, will be an uphill battle, as he’s in a tight race with the likes of Tom Hanks, Leonardo DiCaprio, Chiwetel Ejiofor, and Matthew McConaughey.

Unfortunately for Dern, he’ll also have to squeeze past another 77-year-old, Robert Redford, who is due for a win as well. Surprisingly, this iconic actor »

- Mark Pinkert

Permalink | Report a problem


R.I.P. Character Actor Larry D. Mann

7 January 2014 9:23 PM, PST | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

The man whose 100-plus film and TV credits include voicing Yukon Cornelius in the holiday TV classic Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer and playing the train conductor in Best Picture Oscar winner The Sting died Monday in Los Angeles. Larry D. Mann was 91. The Toronto native got his start on Canadian TV and went on to appear on classic shows ranging from Howdy Doody to MacGyver. In between, his dozens of TV appearances included 77 Sunset Strip, The Big Valley, Ben Casey, My Favorite Martian, Get Smart, The Man From U.N.C.L.E., Hogan’s Heroes, Bewitched, Green Acres, Gunsmoke, Quincy M.E., The Dukes Of Hazzard and recurring as a judge on Hill Street Blues. His big-screen credits include The Quick And The Dead, Robin And The 7 Hoods, The Singing Nun, In The Heat Of The Night and The Octogon. »

- THE DEADLINE TEAM

Permalink | Report a problem


'Rudolph' Voice Actor Larry D. Mann Dies at 91

6 January 2014 5:54 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Larry D. Mann, who voiced Yukon Cornelius in the animated Christmas favorite Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, has died. He was 91. His son, Richard Mann, said the actor died of age-related causes on Monday in Los Angeles. Photos: Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2013 Beginning in the 1950s, the Canadian-born Mann had small roles in movies including The Sting and In the Heat of the Night. On TV, his appearances included Gunsmoke, Bewitched and Hill Street Blues. He also did voice work for animated shows like 1964's Rudolph. His son said Mann's last role before retirement was playing a

read more

»

- The Associated Press

Permalink | Report a problem


Larry Mann, Voice in ‘Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,’ Dies at 91

6 January 2014 4:11 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Larry D. Mann, who voiced Yukon Cornelius in the animated Christmas favorite “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,” died of age-related causes on Monday in Los Angeles. He was 91.

Beginning in the 1950s, the Canadian-born Mann had small roles in movies, including “The Sting” and “In the Heat of the Night.”

On TV, the actor appeared on series including “Gunsmoke,” ”Bewitched,” “Hill Street Blues” and “MacGyver.”

Mann also did voice work for animated shows, including 1964′s “Rudolph.”

Mann’s last role before retirement was playing a talent agent in the 1991 TV show “Homefront.”

Larry D. Mann was a disc jockey in Toronto before becoming an actor, and he later appeared in a series of high-profile commercials for Bell Canada. His brother was the late actor Paul Mann, who appeared in Elia Kazan’s “America and America” and in the film version of “Fiddler on the Roof.”

Survivors include a son, Richard.

»

- Associated Press

Permalink | Report a problem


Veterans Actors Rule and (Possibly) a Couple of Near-Records: Best Actor Predictions for the 86th Academy Awards

4 January 2014 10:02 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Oscar Predictions 2014: Best Actor (Robert Redford in ‘All Is Lost’) (See also: "Oscar Predictions 2014: Best Picture, Best Director.") The 2014 Academy Awards’ Best Actor field is overflowing with well-received performances by film veterans and super-veterans. No less than ten actors are found on our lists of nominees and immediate runners-up; that means our list of Best Actor "long shots" is all but meaningless, as, barring a miracle, there’s no chance for any of those actors to be shortlisted for an Oscar this year. (See also: “Best Actress 2014 Oscar Predictions: Meryl Streep to Break Another Record?”) Note: Our list of likely Best Actor nominees matches four of the 2014 SAG Awards’ five nominees in that category. Now, it’s good to remember three things regarding the SAG Awards vs. the Academy Awards: The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Actors Branch, about 1,100 members, tends to be more "elitist" (or »

- Steve Montgomery

Permalink | Report a problem


Can 'American Hustle' pull off an Oscar 'Sting'?

1 January 2014 7:26 AM, PST | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

One of this year's Oscar frontrunners is “American Hustle;” a film set in the Seventies about an American con. It can’t help but evoke memories of “The Sting,” a film made in 1973 but set in the Thirties about an American con. For “The Sting” -- which has one of the most satisfying endings in cinema -- the biggest hustle was winning Best Picture. Can its modern-day equivalent pull off the same feat this year? Let’s compare them.  The Players Headlining “The Sting” were the two biggest movie stars of the time -- Robert Redford and Paul Newman. While it could be hard to argue anyone in Hollywood today is of their stature, "American Hustle" is packed full of A-listers: Jennifer Lawrence, Bradley Cooper, Christian Bale and Amy Adams. “The Sting” was directed by George Roy Hill who had been nominated four years early for the first film to co-star Redfor. »

Permalink | Report a problem


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000

16 items from 2014


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners