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Sleeper (1973) More at IMDbPro »

2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005

16 items from 2015

According to the Writers Guild, 'Annie Hall' is the funniest screenplay ever

12 November 2015 8:41 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

What's the funniest movie you've ever seen? According to the Writers Guild of America, it's Woody Allen and Marshall Brickman's "Annie Hall."  That's the top of its just-released ranking of the 101 funniest screenplays, and Woody Allen appears several more times on the list: "Sleeper" (60), "Bananas" (69), "Take the Money and Run" (76), "Love and Death" (78), "Manhattan" (81), and "Broadway Danny Rose" (92). Harold Ramis made five appearances on the list, with "Groundhog Day" (3), "National Lampoon's Animal House" (10), "Ghostbusters" (14), "Caddyshack" (25), and "Stripes" (88). And Mel Brooks had "just" three screenplays on the list but they all ranked highly: "Young Frankenstein" (6), "Blazing Saddles" (8), and "The Producers" (12). He's also credited with "The Big Lebowski" (13), but he didn't write that, so I'm sure the WGA will correct its error shortly. (The Coen Brothers, who did write it, also appear at number 23 with "Raising Arizona" and 86 with "Fargo.") The most recent movie to make the list is 2011's "Bridesmaids »

- Sara Morrison

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Woody Allen's 'Annie Hall' Voted Funniest Screenplay of All Time

12 November 2015 7:44 AM, PST | | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Woody Allen's groundbreaking 1977 comedy Annie Hall triumphed over 100 other films – including a handful of the director's other works – to land at Number One on the Writers Guild of America's list of the 101 Funniest Screenplays. The comedy's Allen- and Marshall Brickman-penned script beat out a Top Five that included 1959's Some Like It Hot (Number Two), 1993's Groundhog Day (Three), 1980's Airplane! (Four) and 1982's Tootsie.

In total, Allen placed seven scripts on the 101 Funniest Screenplays list, with Sleeper, Bananas, Take the Money and Run, Love and Death, Manhattan »

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Writers Guild of America Names 'Annie Hall' the Funniest Screenplay of All Time

12 November 2015 7:00 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: The 25 Best Comedies Of The 21st Century So Far The Writers Guild of America has weighed in on the funniest films of all time, putting together a list of 101 features they consider to be the best comedies the movie business has ever offered. The awards for the 101 funniest screenplays were announced at Hollywood's Arclight Cinema Dome over a two-hour discussion panel hosted by Rob Reiner. The WGA East announced the winners in New York at the New School Auditorium in Greenwich Village. Woody Allen's Oscar-winning screenplay for "Annie Hall" topped the list, though it was just one of seven titles by the writer-director that was included on the list. Allen's other entries included "Sleeper," "Bananas," "Take the Money and Run," "Broadway Danny Rose," "Love and Death" and "Manhattan." "Some Like it Hot," "Groundhog Day," "Airplane!" and "Tootsie" rounded out »

- Zack Sharf

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The 101 Funniest Screenplays of All-Time, According to the WGA

12 November 2015 5:38 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Perhaps the most subjective genre in cinema, the same comedy can cause one viewer to have tears of laughter and another to not crack a smile. So, while knowing there can be no definitive list of the finest in the genre, the Writers Guild of America attempted to narrow down the 101 funniest screenplays. Noting the distinction from the best in the genre, these 101 films should simply produce the most laughs.

Topping the list is Woody Allen‘s Best Picture-winning Annie Hall, a choice difficult to argue with. Rounding out the top five were Some Like it Hot, Groundhog Day, Airplane! and Tootsie, while films from the Coens, Stanley Kubrick, Wes Anderson, and Edgar Wright were also mentioned. There are also some genuine head-scratching inclusions, including The Hangover at 30, and, as much as I enjoy the film, Bridesmaids nearly making the top 15, but overall, if one is looking to brighten their mood, »

- Jordan Raup

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‘Annie Hall’ Named Funniest Screenplay by WGA Members

11 November 2015 9:46 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Annie Hall” has been named the funniest screenplay in voting by the members of the Writers Guild of America.

The script by Woody Allen and Marshall Brickman topped “Some Like it Hot,” “Groundhog Day,” “Airplane!” and “Tootsie,” which make up the rest of the top five. “Young Frankenstein,” “Dr. Strangelove,” “Blazing Saddles,” “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” and “National Lampoon’s Animal House” rounded out the top 10.

The awards for the 101 funniest screenplays were announced at the Arclight Cinerama Dome in Hollywood at the conclusion of two hours of panel discussions and clips, hosted by Rob Reiner. He noted that his “This Is Spinal Tap” script had finished at the No. 11 spot — a coincidence that recalled the “go to 11” amplifier joke in the film.

The “Annie Hall” screenplay won the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay in 1977. Allen had six other scripts on the list — “Sleeper,” “Bananas,” “Take the Money and Run, »

- Dave McNary

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Rewind Film Festival kicks off tonight in Dublin

5 November 2015 5:53 AM, PST | | See recent TheMovieBit news »

This year sees the first outing of Rewind, a new and exciting Dublin film festival, taking place at Rua Red Arts Centre in Tallaght. In the tradition of classic repertory cinema, the arts centre will present a series of iconic movies specifically chosen by curator Matthew Nolan, to promote discussion around what it is to be a film spectator in 2015 including:               The Thing from Another World – classic 1950s cold war horror (5th Nov, 9pm)             Akira – the great cyberpunk thriller and anime classic. (7th Nov, 8.30pm) Godzilla – the mother and father of all monster movies. (7th Nov, 10.30am) Tron – one of the first to truly address our place in the digital age. (7th Nov, 3pm) SleeperWoody Allen’s classic take on what the future holds. (6th Nov, 8.30pm) Thx 1138George Lucas’s real Sci-Fi classic! (6th Nov, »

- (Clare Daly)

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Venice Film Review: ‘Equals’

4 September 2015 4:13 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Equals” director Drake Doremus has good news and bad news about the future. The bad news is that love, sex and anything to do with human emotion has been eradicated, which means it won’t be easy for Nicholas Hoult and Kristen Stewart to follow through on the longing gazes they exchange from across their post-apocalyptic habitat. On the bright side, however, the fashion’s not bad (much classier than those high-waisted trousers the future folk wear in Spike Jonze’s “Her”) and the architecture is downright fantastic, so there’s plenty to satisfy the peepers, even above and beyond this conceptual romance’s already easy-on-the-eyes (and even easier-to-market) co-stars.

Younger-skewing than Doremus’ two first films, “Like Crazy” and “Breathe In,” this simplistic and over-obvious allegory of love — from the emotion’s hesitant origins to its potentially tragic fizzle — should resonate most with the arthouse-going segment of the “Twilight” fanbase, »

- Peter Debruge

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“Irrational Man” and back: Ranking the films of Woody Allen

17 July 2015 1:31 PM, PDT | | See recent news »

I know I’m one of the few, but in my humble opinion Woody Allen has yet to make an overtly bad film. His best are all time classics, but even his worst are still very much watchable movies that have pleasures to be found within them. On the occasion of the release of his latest outing Irrational Man, I wanted to run down all of Allen’s solo directorial endeavors and rank them. I’ll also be writing a bit about Irrational Man first, but below you’ll find a list of all 45 of his works to date. In the interest of not making this the longest piece in existence, I’m only going to be writing about the top ten, but the list will go down the line of everything he’s made (with the exception of what he didn’t direct, didn’t completely direct, or made »

- Joey Magidson

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Amazon’s Prime Day DVD & Blu-ray Deals

15 July 2015 12:06 AM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

While many of you might have blown your DVD and Blu-ray budget on the bi-annual Barnes & Noble / Criterion Collection sale which started last week, Amazon is here to bring you to new levels of debt.

Earlier this month Amazon revealed that on July 15th, 2015, they would begin a new tradition: Prime Day. Those folks who subscribe to Amazon Prime are able to take advantage of these deals. You can still take advantage of their free trial.

There are lots of great non-disc deals, but I’ll collect all of my favorite DVD and Blu-ray deals here for you.

These are affiliate links, and I really appreciate any purchases you make by clicking through our links.

Lightning Deals Movies Criterion Collection Deals Blu-rays Under $10 The Lord Of The Rings: The Motion Picture Trilogy for $27.99 (77% off) The Man With No Name Trilogy (Remastered Edition) for $13.99 (65% off) The Woody Allen Blu-ray Bundle (Annie Hall, »

- Ryan Gallagher

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Emma Stone Reveals Which Irrational Man Scene Made Her Mom Crack Up, Dishes on La La Land With Ryan Gosling—Watch

10 July 2015 9:21 AM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

Don't be so modest! Emma Stone first worked with Woody Allen in 2014's Magic in the Moonlight, and she teamed up with the director a second time in Irrational Man, in theaters today. Still, she's not comfortable being called his muse. "I tend to just disagree, but I did do two movies with him, know," Stone told E! News. During a recent press junket interview, Stone said her favorite Allen film "kind of switches all the time," but her favorite at the moment is 1973's Sleeper. "I love the kind of wacky, outlandish satire," she said. In Irrational Man, Joaquin Phoenix plays a philosophy professor who suffers an existential crisis and begins an affair with a »

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Drive-In Dust Offs: Westworld

4 July 2015 11:05 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

As a kid, you can’t be picky where you find your fix of sci-fi and horror. Sometimes it’s the big screen, but often (for me, anyway) it was that living room landmark, television. I remember being seven and watching a Western where a couple of guys are on vacation at a resort where you can be a cowboy and have gunfights with androids (Sci-Fi, sweet!). And then…bad things start to happen. The androids break down, and now they’re killing the guests (ooh, Horror!). My head reeled from this magical swirl, a mesh of circuitry and chaos. Welcome to Westworld (1973), and its parent resort, Delos. Their slogan: Have we got a vacation for you.

This was a pretty good year for Sci-Fi. Soylent Green made a splash (“It’s Peeoople!!!”), the latest installment in the Apes franchise, Battle for the Planet of the Apes, and Woody Allen »

- Scott Drebit

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Woody Allen’s Producer Jack Rollins Dies at 100

18 June 2015 5:46 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Longtime comedy producer-manager Jack Rollins, who handled Woody Allen, David Letterman, Billy Crystal, Robin Williams and Lenny Bruce, died Thursday at his home in Manhattan. He was 100.

Rollins, a native of Brooklyn, was a co-producer with the late Charles H. Joffe on many of Allen’s films. The duo managed many of the industry’s top comedy acts starting in the 1960s.

Rollins appeared briefly in Allen’s 1984 film, “Broadway Danny Rose,” in which Allen played a manager of a variety of strange acts — a character he loosely modeled on Rollins.

Rollins and Joffe had producing credits on all of Allen’s films between 1969 and 1993, including “Take the Money and Run,” “Annie Hall,” “Manhattan,” “Bananas,” Sleeper,” “Hannah and Her Sisters,” “Zelig,” “Radio Days” and “Crimes and Misdemeanors.”

Born as Jacob Rabinowitz in Brooklyn, he broke into the business after World War II as a Broadway producer, then founded a talent »

- Dave McNary

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5 Flights Up Review

7 May 2015 3:06 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

When one actor is particularly magnetic to watch, the well-worn adage goes that fans would pay money to see that actor read the phone book. Fans of Diane Keaton and Morgan Freeman that would find that directory patter electrifying will be part of the target audience for 5 Flights Up, yet another septuagenarian drama that coasts almost entirely on the gentle chemistry between those stars. If you’re willing to pay money to see them go apartment shopping, this is the film for you.

Freeman and Keaton star as Alex and Ruth Carver, a charming couple with mixed feelings about selling their quaint Brooklyn apartment – one that overlooks the bridge, has a garden on the roof and plenty of sunlight coming through the windows. They have lived at this picturesque location for 40 years, but now that Ruth has retired from teaching and Alex huffs to get up the five flights leading to the door, »

- Jordan Adler

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Why 1973 Was the Best Year in Movie History

30 April 2015 4:00 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

All week our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century. Click here for a complete list of our essays. It’s perhaps a little quaint to choose a year that I wasn’t even alive during to represent the best year of cinema. I was not there to observe how any of these films conversed with the culture around them when they were first screened. So, although I am choosing the glorious year of 1973, I am choosing not just due to a perusal of top ten lists that year—but because the films that were released that year greatly influenced how I engage with movies now, in 2015. Films speak to more than just the audiences that watch them—they speak to each other. Filmmakers inspire each other. Allusions are made. A patchwork begins. These are the movies of our lives. Having grown up with cinema in the 90s, »

- Brian Formo

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10 ridiculously silly movie orgasms: Jennifer Aniston, Jason Biggs & more

13 February 2015 1:00 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

The hotly-anticipated Fifty Shades of Grey movie is finally released in cinemas today (February 13) to coincide with Valentine's Day this weekend, and it's got our minds racing about just one thing....

The most ridiculously silly orgasms in movie history, obviously!

From Jennifer Aniston's otherworldly pleasure to Jason Biggs's doubly embarrassing shortcomings - here are 10 fantastically farcical orgasms on the silver screen below:

1. Jason Biggs in American Pie (1999)

Virginal, apple pie-bonking Jim Levenstein can't believe his luck when his history tutoring with sexy Slovakian exchange student Nadia (Shannon Elizabeth) turns into something more. So excited is Jim, however, that he barely contains himself at her touch, only lasting a few more seconds on second go, until he, er, explodes again.

Sadly Stifler (Seann William Scott) had previously coerced Jim to set up a webcam in his room so they can all watch the frisky teenage pair, but he unwittingly »

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The fantasist: The comic art of Woody Allen

24 January 2015 12:49 PM, PST | The Moving Arts Journal | See recent The Moving Arts Journal news »

Everyone knows Woody Allen. At least, everyone thinks they know Woody Allen. His plumage is easily identifiable: horn-rimmed glasses, baggy suit, wispy hair, kvetching demeanor, ironic sense of humor, acute fear of death. As is his habitat: New York City, though recently he has flown as far afield as London, Barcelona, and Paris. His likes are well known: Bergman, Dostoevsky, New Orleans jazz. So too his dislikes: spiders, cars, nature, Wagner records, the entire city of Los Angeles. Whether or not these traits represent the true Allen, who’s to say? It is impossible to tell, with Allen, where cinema ends and life begins, an obfuscation he readily encourages. In the late nineteen-seventies, disillusioned with the comedic success he’d found making such films as Sleeper (1973), Love and Death (1975), and Annie Hall (1977), he turned for darker territory with Stardust Memories (1980), a film in which, none too surprisingly, he plays a »

- Graham Daseler

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005

16 items from 2015, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

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