IMDb > Sleeper (1973)
Sleeper
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Sleeper (1973) More at IMDbPro »

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Sleeper -- A nerdish store owner is revived out of cryostasis into a future world to fight an oppressive government.

Overview

User Rating:
7.3/10   34,529 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Woody Allen (written by) and
Marshall Brickman (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for Sleeper on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
17 December 1973 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
A love story about two people who hate each other. 200 years in the future. See more »
Plot:
A nerdish store owner is revived out of cryostasis into a future world to fight an oppressive government. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
2 wins & 2 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
A treasure among other comedies because of its wit and charm. See more (130 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Woody Allen ... Miles Monroe

Diane Keaton ... Luna Schlosser

John Beck ... Erno Windt
Mary Gregory ... Dr. Melik

Don Keefer ... Dr. Tryon
John McLiam ... Dr. Agon

Bartlett Robinson ... Dr. Orva
Chris Forbes ... Rainer Krebs

Mews Small ... Dr. Nero (as Marya Small)

Peter Hobbs ... Dr. Dean
Susan Miller ... Ellen Pogrebin
Lou Picetti ... M.C.
Jessica Rains ... Woman in the Mirror

Brian Avery ... Herald Cohen

Spencer Milligan ... Jeb Hrmthmg
Stanley Ross ... Sears Swiggles
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
John Cannon ... Various Voice-Overs (voice) (uncredited)
Myron Cohen ... Robot tailor (uncredited)

Regis Cordic ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Howard Cosell ... Himself - on Wide World of Sports (archive footage) (uncredited)

George Furth ... Guest at Luna's Party (uncredited)
Seamon Glass ... Guard (uncredited)

Jerry Hardin ... Cryogenic lab doctor (uncredited)
Doug Jinks ... Freedom fighter (uncredited)
Laurence Kirchmar ... McDonald's Kid (uncredited)

Jackie Mason ... Robot Tailor (voice) (uncredited)
Read Morgan ... Domesticon Rep (uncredited)

Richard Nixon ... Himself - Checkers Speech, Discloses His Personal Finances (archive footage) (uncredited)

Albert Popwell ... Reprogramming Scientist (uncredited)
Douglas Rain ... Evil Computer / Various Robot Butlers (voice) (uncredited)
Whitney Rydbeck ... Janus (uncredited)

Directed by
Woody Allen 
 
Writing credits
Woody Allen (written by) and
Marshall Brickman (written by)

Produced by
Marshall Brickman .... associate producer
Jack Grossberg .... producer
Charles H. Joffe .... executive producer
Ralph Rosenblum .... associate producer
Jack Rollins .... executive producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Woody Allen 
 
Cinematography by
David M. Walsh (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
O. Nicholas Brown (film editor)
Ron Kalish (film editor)
Ralph Rosenblum (edited by)
 
Casting by
Lynn Stalmaster 
 
Production Design by
Dale Hennesy 
 
Set Decoration by
Gary Moreno 
Robert De Vestel (uncredited)
 
Costume Design by
Joel Schumacher 
 
Makeup Department
Del Acevedo .... makeup
Janice Brunson .... hair stylist
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Fred T. Gallo .... first assistant director
Henry J. Lange Jr. .... second assistant director
 
Art Department
Barry Bedig .... property master
Charles Deaton .... architect: Doctor Melik's house
Jack M. Marino .... assistant property master
Gary Martin .... set coordinator (as Gary O. Martin)
Dianne Wager .... set designer
Gary Martin .... construction (uncredited)
James T. Woods .... set painter (uncredited)
Robert L. Zilliox .... lead man (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Al Gramaglia .... rerecording: Magno Sound Recording Inc.
Norman Kasow .... sound effects editing: Filmsounds, Inc.
Jack Solomon .... sound mixer
Jess Soraci .... sound effects editing: Filmsounds, Inc.
Ron Kalish .... sound editor (uncredited)
Joe Kenworthy .... swing (uncredited)
Al Yaylian .... boom operator (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
A.D. Flowers .... special effects
Gerald Endler .... location special effects (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
Bill Hansard .... background projection
Harvey Plastrik .... opticals
Ralph Rosenblum .... visual effects editor (uncredited)
 
Stunts
M. James Arnett .... stunt coordinator
James M. Halty .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Joseph Edesa .... gaffer
Norman Harris .... best boy (as Norman L. Harris)
Clyde Hart .... key grip (as Clyde W. Hart)
Roger Shearman .... camera operator
Bill Avery .... still photographer (uncredited)
Richard N. Hannah .... camera technician (uncredited)
Victor King .... second assistant camera (uncredited)
Don Whipple .... dolly grip (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Arnie Lipin .... wardrobe supervisor (as Arnold M. Lipin)
G. Fern Weber .... wardrobe supervisor
 
Editorial Department
Trudy Ship .... assistant editor
 
Location Management
R.J. Louis .... location coordinator
 
Music Department
Felix Giglio .... music supervisor
The New Orleans Funeral Ragtime Orchestra .... music
Preservation Hall Jazz Band .... music (as The Preservation Hall Jazz Band)
Phil Ramone .... music recordist
 
Transportation Department
Joe Sawyers .... transportation captain (as Joe R. Sawyers)
Richard Enoch .... driver (uncredited)
Chris Haynes .... driver (uncredited)
Donald H. Lewis .... driver (uncredited)
Russell McEntyre .... driver (uncredited)
Bill Van Hoek .... driver: cine II (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Antonio Encarnacion .... assistant to the producer (as Tony Encamacion)
Jean Gingerich .... production accountant
Norman Gorbaty .... title designer
Doris Grau .... script supervisor
Lori Imbler .... production secretary
Joel Marrow .... assistant to the producer
Peter J. Silbermann .... unit publicist
Ben Bova .... science consultant (uncredited)
Elizabeth Claman .... secretary to director (uncredited)
Peter Herald .... representative: United Artists (uncredited)
Johnny Jensen .... technician: Cinemobile (uncredited)
Peter Page .... voice: Rags the Robot Dog (uncredited)
Teresa Stokovic .... production secretary (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
89 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The device used to give injections is actually a "desoldering vacuum" (used for disassembling electronic components) that has been painted white.See more »
Goofs:
Factual errors: The Volkswagen's battery would have long since died.See more »
Quotes:
Erno Windt:Oy, gevalt! What will the goyim say!See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Till We Meet AgainSee more »

FAQ

Who is Albert Shanker?
See more »
25 out of 30 people found the following review useful.
A treasure among other comedies because of its wit and charm., 27 May 2003
Author: ilovedolby from New York State

Woody Allen's films are generally treasured among other comedies because of their wit and charm. Many critics would agree, though, that Allen's earlier films were among his best. One of those movies was a lighthearted film called `Sleeper,' which starred a younger version of Allen and a younger, but always beautiful Diane Keaton. Although `Sleeper' leaves a person in stitches from laughter, its one flaw is that it lacks an ending. But don't let that stop you from seeing this comedy classic. In the end, who cares where it goes because it's just flat out funny. `Sleeper' is the story of Miles Monroe (Allen), who is cryogenically frozen in 1973 after having a procedure in a hospital. He is awoken nearly 200 years later by a group of scientists who want Monroe to help them defeat the leader of their society, as America's future consists of a totalitarian state. While on his adventure through this futuristic world, Monroe meets a beautiful woman named Luna Schlosser (Keaton) who he begins to have a love interest in. The two team up to try to oust their tyrannical government and bring about freedom and prosperity. `Sleeper' was hysterical from beginning to end. The very opening scene shows Monroe covered in tin foil-clearly scientists in 1973 found new and amazing uses for this wonderful kitchen product. As soon as Monroe awakens, he is disoriented, smiling aimlessly into space and walking backwards and into people. Allen's comical blend of intellect and charm shows up soon after. The futuristic society is comprised of people who have no historical references for the events of the past 200 years, as their leader has undoubtedly outlawed certain forms of knowledge that could lead to rebellion. They use Monroe to fill in the historical gaps by showing him pictures of famous twentieth century individuals, such as Joseph Stalin. Monroe provides his own synopsis of their contributions to the world in his own clever way, as he does also for former President Nixon. Allen's writing, direction and performance were hilarious. Rarely do we see writing as clever and sidesplitting in today's comedies. The only other comic director today that could even compare to Allen would be Christopher Guest, whose mockumentary films such as `Best In Show,' and the recent `A Mighty Wind,' have a real source of comedy. Most present comedies are trivial, filled with rehashed jokes that depend more on toilet humor than any form of real wittiness. The film's only problem is that after an hour and a half, it doesn't seem to know what to do with itself. It ends on a clever note about love with the protagonists somehow managing to save themselves, but not really the day. They realize that perhaps the only thing worth fighting for, in the end is love. All in all, `Sleeper' was a very funny farce on science fiction stories, and it cemented Allen's ability to be an engaging and funny in his films. ***

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