IMDb > Scarecrow (1973)
Scarecrow
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Scarecrow (1973) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
7.3/10   8,693 votes »
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Director:
Writer:
Garry Michael White (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for Scarecrow on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
26 May 1973 (France) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
The road leads itself to somewhere.
Plot:
Max, an ex-con drifter with a penchant for brawling is amused by Lion, a homeless ex-sailor, and they partner up as they head east together. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
4 wins See more »
User Reviews:
unusual character study/road movie that could only be made in the 70s See more (65 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Gene Hackman ... Max

Al Pacino ... Lion

Dorothy Tristan ... Coley

Ann Wedgeworth ... Frenchy

Richard Lynch ... Riley

Eileen Brennan ... Darlene

Penelope Allen ... Annie
Richard Hackman ... Mickey
Al Cingolani ... Skipper

Rutanya Alda ... Woman in camper
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Mary Ann Brownlee ... Hooker (uncredited)
Nicholas Carbone ... Child (uncredited)
Frank Chartier ... Bartender (uncredited)
James G. Cureman ... Hippie (uncredited)
Armen Darakdjian ... Lion's Son (uncredited)
June Denning ... Myra (uncredited)
June Dixon ... Waitress (uncredited)
Richard Jamison ... Young Man (uncredited)
Karen Lamm ... Waitress (uncredited)
Louise Martin ... Ticket Clerk (uncredited)
Charles Noel ... Doctor (uncredited)
Albert Schmidt ... Drunk (uncredited)
Patricia A. Wasson ... Mother (uncredited)
Audrianne Waters ... Nurse (uncredited)
John G. Wedum ... Clerk (uncredited)
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Directed by
Jerry Schatzberg 
 
Writing credits
Garry Michael White (written by)

Produced by
Robert M. Sherman .... producer
 
Original Music by
Fred Myrow 
 
Cinematography by
Vilmos Zsigmond (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Evan A. Lottman  (as Evan Lottman)
 
Production Design by
Albert Brenner  (as Al Brenner)
 
Costume Design by
Jo Ynocencio 
 
Makeup Department
Frank Griffin .... makeup artist
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Charles Bonniwell .... second assistant director
Tom Shaw .... assistant director
Paul J. Crossey .... dga trainee (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Ray Mercer Jr. .... property master (as Ray Mercer)
 
Sound Department
Edward Beyer .... sound editor
Victor Goode .... sound
Arthur Piantadosi .... sound re-recording mixer
Robert M. Reitano .... sound editor
Barry Thomas .... sound
 
Special Effects by
Candy Flanagin .... special effects
 
Camera and Electrical Department
James O. Blair .... gaffer (as Jim Blair)
Jim Buchanan .... best boy
Tom May .... key grip
John R. Shannon .... still photographer (as John Shannon)
Sven Walnum .... camera operator
 
Editorial Department
Kate Hirson .... assistant editor
Michael Jacobi .... assistant editor
Craig McKay .... associate editor
 
Music Department
Dan Wallin .... score mixer (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Anthony Goldschmidt .... title designer
Betty A. Griffin .... script supervisor
Gene Levy .... assistant to the producer
Anne Shaw .... production secretary
Vernon White .... publicist
Kit Andree .... voice (uncredited)
Marilyn Chris .... voice (uncredited)
Lucille Cole .... voice (uncredited)
Henry Hank .... voice (uncredited)
James Howard Horn .... voice (uncredited)
Rowena McNally .... voice (uncredited)
Charles Noel .... voice (uncredited)
Dennis O'Shea .... voice (uncredited)
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies
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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
112 min | Australia:108 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:18 | Australia:M | Australia:R (original rating) | Chile:18 | Finland:K-16 | France:-12 | Netherlands:12 (original rating) | Norway:16 | Portugal:M/12 | Singapore:NC-16 | Sweden:15 | UK:X (original rating) | UK:18 (video) | USA:R | West Germany:16
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
According to Al Pacino, he and Gene Hackman did not get along very well during filming due to their different personalities.See more »
Quotes:
Lion:[First lines] Hi,how you doin'See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in Little White Lies (2010)See more »
Soundtrack:
Silver MoonSee more »

FAQ

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17 out of 19 people found the following review useful.
unusual character study/road movie that could only be made in the 70s, 21 January 2008
Author: MisterWhiplash from United States

Scarecrow is a low-key film that succeeds on all its ambitions, but not because it tries to aim low. That the tone at times doesn't feel as emotionally incredible or intense as some other films Gene Hackman and Al Pacino got their star-making turns in the 70s (French Connection, Dog Day Afternoon, Serpico) doesn't mean it's unsuccessful either. Jerry Schatzberg and his writer are out to capture a kind of outsider view of men trying to find their places in society, almost like how Michael Cimino would do (to a more genre-oriented extent) with Thunderbolt and Lightfoot. It's not a movie a lot of people would go out of their way to see, even with the star power involved. It's about two guys who've been released from confinement from the world around them, Max from six years in jail (Hackman), Francis from five years out at sea in the Navy (Pacino), and how the two meet up unintentionally while hitchhiking, unlikely pair up, and Hackman gets Pacino to go in with him on opening up a car wash in Pittsburgh.

Why Pittsburgh? Just one of the peculiarities of Max, mayhap? More-so a thing of pride. There's characteristics to Max and Francis that make them compelling for the honesty in what they are: Max is a tough guy, tending to get drunk, get in fights, sex it up with women (who knew Hackman had such, um, animal magnetism), and Francis (also named Lion by Max) is a clown, a little boy who somehow made the mistake of having a kid with a woman before he left the Navy, and has a present ready to give to the kid in Detroit- an androgynous lamp- despite not knowing entirely what to expect. It's an odd couple movie, but also one that has a more affecting view into a world of men on the fringe of society. These guys don't have big plans, and wouldn't want any anyway. It's refreshing to see that, and how it pans into the nature of them and their environment: the small towns, the local dives, the bad drunks, and, when things go bad after a big brawl during a drunken hoopla, the subtle horrors of prison for the both of them. Did I mention train-hopping?

A film like this, despite having on its side gorgeous cinematography by Vilmos Zsigmond (who, along with Badlands and, in its own way Mean Streets, captures a vision of Americana that is pure and unique to its time and place), needs strong acting. Who better than Hackman and Pacino? They're playing big personalities, with Hackman doing great as always in a somewhat typical part of a guy who's aggressive and pig-headed but does have a hear. And Pacino doing a rare comedic turn as he gives some of his funniest (genuine, not unintentional scene-stealing) moments, like his 'diversion' gone wrong in the clothing store, or his classic "teach me how to handle a drunk" bit at the bar. Sometimes its too much, but it leads to a bittersweet side to the story that turns even more bitter by the time Schatzberg reaches the emotional climax in Detroit. What's been alternately crude and crazy, sometimes in ways that remind one a little of Altman, turns towards what is a small but great tragedy for these characters. And doing the script one better, the actors are able to get subtle, crushing, telling moments in scenes that others wouldn't be able to grasp with a ten-foot pole.

It's also a fun movie, with a feel that you could only get in one of the truly great years in all movies (look at the year this came out, and realize how many films of its ilk were released, be they independent-like from Scorsese or Altman or Ashby or even Romero, or even Friedkin's Exorcist). Scarecrow is of its time, but it doesn't mean it can't be greatly liked in the present; it's even a near classic of genre subversion, doing a service to drama and comedy by not paying lip-service to either form, but enriching what comes naturally out of life, which is both sometimes, harrowingly, at once. 9.5/10

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Message Boards

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Max' clothing habbit (linking to wizard of oz) orsonrout
Cillian Murphy's favorite movie, apparently Wellesian
By the fountain...? newbadboy985
Scarecrow is a true classic! fine-taste
Similar to Of Mice and Men FeinMess
One of the most underrated films of this prolific decade thepawnbroker
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