Rhinoceros (1974) - News Poster

(1974)

News

Match the Gene Wilder character to the film - quiz

As we bid farewell this week to the mighty Gene Wilder, find out how many of his movie roles you can recognise

Quackser Fortune Has a Cousin in the Bronx

Bonnie and Clyde

The Producers

Young Frankenstein

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex* (*But Were Afraid to Ask)

Rhinoceros

The Woman in Red

Silver Streak

The Frisco Kid

Haunted Honeymoon

Blazing Saddles

Stir Crazy

Blazing Saddles

The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes' Smarter Brother

Start the Revolution Without Me

Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory

Quackser Fortune Has a Cousin in the Bronx

The Woman in Red

The World's Greatest Lover

Silver Streak

Stir Crazy

See No Evil, Hear No Evil

Hanky Panky

Another You

Silver Streak

Sunday Lovers

Bonnie and Clyde

Blazing Saddles

The Little Prince

Young Frankenstein

The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes' Smarter Brother

Rhinoceros

See No Evil, Hear No Evil

The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes' Smarter Brother
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Iconic Comic Actor Gene Wilder Dies at Age 83

The sad news for fans of film comedy spread like wildfire earlier this week. Here’s the opening paragraph facts from the New York Times:

Gene Wilder, who established himself as one of America’s foremost comic actors with his delightfully neurotic performances in three films directed by Mel Brooks; his eccentric star turn in the family classic “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory”; and his winning chemistry with Richard Pryor in the box-office smash “Stir Crazy,” died early Monday morning at his home in Stamford, Conn. He was 83.

A nephew, the filmmaker Jordan Walker-Pearlman, confirmed his death in a statement, saying the cause was complications of Alzheimer’s disease.

Mr. Wilder’s rule for comedy was simple: Don’t try to make it funny; try to make it real. “I’m an actor, not a clown,” he said more than once.

And what an actor. That’s from the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Fargo Recap: Kiss My Grits

  • Vulture
Fargo Recap: Kiss My Grits
Crossing the halfway point of this brilliant second season, we reach what could be considered a transitional episode. It's filled with cliffhangers and unanswered questions, but amplified with enough tension to also entertain. "Rhinoceros" is the most functional episode of the season, often playing out in actual time as if it were 24 — which is a crossover I would totally watch. "This is a true story. Events take place in real time, ya know.""Rhinoceros," named after the Eugène Ionesco's play about groupthink and conformity, picks up minutes after the end of episode five. Lou (Patrick Wilson) and Hank (Ted Danson) have arrived at the Blumquist home, where they take Ed (Jesse Plemons) into custody, much to the protestation of Peggy (Kirsten Dunst). "You're not gonna prove my Ed did anything wrong! It's un-provable!" she yells. It's not that he didn't do anything wrong, though. They just can't prove it.
See full article at Vulture »

Screen Legend Eli Wallach Passes Away

One of American cinemas most accomplished performers has passed away in New York City: veteran stage and screen actor Eli Wallach, who will be forever known for his role as Tuco in Sergio Leone’s classic spaghetti Western The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, died Tuesday at the age of 98. His daughter Katherine confirmed Wallach’s passing.

Wallach was one of the most respected and prolific character actors of his generation, appearing in such disparate roles as the Mexican bandit opposite Clint Eastwood in Leone’s immortal Western, a meek, confused clerk in Eugène Ionesco’s absurdist play “Rhinoceros”, the leader of the band of marauders up against Yul Brynner’s The Magnificent Seven, a mafia don in The Godfather Part III and (believe it or not), ...

Click to continue reading Screen Legend Eli Wallach Passes Away
See full article at Screen Rant »

Eli Wallach, ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’ Star, Dies at 98

Eli Wallach, ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’ Star, Dies at 98
Tony- and Emmy-winning actor Eli Wallach, a major proponent of “the Method” style of acting best known for his starring role in Elia Kazan’s film “Baby Doll” and for his role as villain Tuco in iconic spaghetti Western “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” died on Tuesday, according to the New York Times. He was 98.

On the bigscreen Wallach had few turns as a leading man, but none was as strong as his first starring role in 1956’s “Baby Doll,” in which he played a leering cotton gin owner intent on seducing the virgin bride (Carroll Baker) of his business rival (Karl Malden). But he appeared in more than 80 films, offering colorful turns in character roles in movies such as “The Magnificent Seven,” “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” “Nuts,” “Lord Jim,” “The Misfits” and “The Two Jakes.”

The actor, who appeared in a wide variety of stage,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Eli Wallach, ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’ Star, Dies at 98

Eli Wallach, ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’ Star, Dies at 98
Tony- and Emmy-winning actor Eli Wallach, a major proponent of “the Method” style of acting best known for his starring role in Elia Kazan’s film “Baby Doll” and for his role as villain Tuco in iconic spaghetti Western “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” died on Tuesday, according to the New York Times. He was 98.

On the bigscreen Wallach had few turns as a leading man, but none was as strong as his first starring role in 1956’s “Baby Doll,” in which he played a leering cotton gin owner intent on seducing the virgin bride (Carroll Baker) of his business rival (Karl Malden). But he appeared in more than 80 films, offering colorful turns in character roles in movies such as “The Magnificent Seven,” “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” “Nuts,” “Lord Jim,” “The Misfits” and “The Two Jakes.”

The actor, who appeared in a wide variety of stage,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Eli Wallach, 'The Good, The Bad and The Ugly' Actor, Dies At 98

Iconic stage and screen star Eli Wallach, known for performances in The Good, the Bad and the Ugly and The Magnificent Seven, died Tuesday. He was 98.

Eli Wallach Dies

Wallach’s death was confirmed by a family member to CNN.

Over the course of his storied career, Wallach accumulated more that 150 film credits. In addition to 60s Westerns The Magnificent Seven and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, he starred in The Misfits, Lord Jim, Tour Guys, The Two Jakes, The Godfather: Part III and The Holiday. His last major motion picture was 2013’s Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps.

Among the Hollywood elite Wallach starred alongside were Clint Eastwood, Marilyn Monroe, Clark Gable, Kirk Douglas, Jack Nicholson and Kate Winslet.

Though film paid the bills, Wallach’s passion was the theatre. “For actors, movies are a means to an end," Wallach told The New York Times in 1973. "I go
See full article at Uinterview »

Karen Black obituary

Actor with a talent for conveying her characters' rich and troubled inner lives

The New Hollywood movement was primarily a male, auteur-led phenomenon. But the contribution of performers as adventurous and vital as Karen Black, who has died aged 74 from complications from cancer, should not be overlooked. Black was electrified as well as electrifying: her tornado of hair, her fearless physicality and those indelible feline eyes combined to create a woozy and unapologetic sexual energy. She looked offbeat, and she knew how to use that. "I couldn't have been an actress in the 1930s," she said, reflecting on her role as a movie extra in The Day of the Locust (1975). "My face moves around too much."

It was in the late 1960s and 70s that she became one of the great character actors of Us cinema in a series of performances in key New Hollywood works. Partly it was that
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

2013 Ann Arbor Film Festival: Official Lineup

The Ann Arbor Film Festival, having survived their half-a-century blowout in 2012, is back with another rip-roarin’ 51st edition in 2013, which will run from March 19-24, screening a mind-boggling amount of experimental short films and a few features.

Highlights of the fest include:

Special presentations by this year’s jurors, including Marcin Gizycki round-up of Polish animation from the 1950s to the present; Laida Lertxundi’s selection of some of her films as well as her biggest influences; and Kevin Jerome Everson’s mini-retrospective of his own films.

There’s also special tributes to Pat O’Neill, including a retrospective of his short films from the ’70s to the present as well as a screening of his 1989 35mm experimental epic Water and Power; Suzan Pitt, with selections of short films from her career; and a screening of Ken Burns’ latest doc The Central Park Five, co-directed with his daughter Sarah Burns and son-in-law David McMahon,
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

Ulterior Structuralist Motives -- With Zombies

  • IFC
Ulterior Structuralist Motives -- With Zombies
Low-budget, Canadian and sneaky as hell, Bruce McDonald's "Pontypool" is a movie that restores your faith in the ability of genre movies to rabbit-punch your limbic system and your frontal lobe at the same time. Just grabbing the ingenious premise with two hands is a moviehead thrill: the setting is the local radio station for a tiny Ontario town, so small that it occupies not its own building but the basement of a church. The protagonist is Grant Mazzy (Stephen McHattie), a grizzled, boozy, pretentious shock jock whose downward career spiral has landed him in the provincial wilderness, where his indulgent ramblings are largely unwelcome and where he's only supposed to deliver weather and traffic news. His foils are the patient station manager (Lisa Houle) and a young intern (Georgina Reilly). Amidst the morning-drive drudgery, reports begin to trickle in, of crowds forming and riots beginning and people being chased and torn apart.
See full article at IFC »

Remember...The American Film Theatre!

  • CinemaRetro
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By Raymond Benson

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Want to go see a Broadway or West End stage play—but at the local cinema? No, it’s not a filmed stage production. It’s a play translated to the film medium, but with complete faithfulness to the original play script. Not only that, it stars big name actors and is directed by a top-notch director. To complete the conceit, you get handed a playbill (program) when you enter the theater. There might even be an intermission—or two! And you have only four showtimes at which you can view the picture before it disappears, and you have to buy your ticket in advance with a subscription for a whole “season” of these filmed plays, or staged films, or whatever you want to call them.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Zombie Strippers

Zombie Strippers
Triumph Films

The acting is pretty bad, the dialogue is worse and the production quality as a whole bears that unmistakable ultralow-budget, direct-to-DVD sheen, but Zombie Strippers, which bows April 18, could never be accused of failing to live up to its title.

Starring adult entertainment industry queen Jenna Jameson and loosely inspired by Eugene Ionesco's Rhinoceros, Jay Lee's grotesque little horror film makes up for in audacity what it might lack in finesse.

Set at the start of George W. Bush's fourth consecutive term in office, the cautionary tale finds the U.S. military, fighting wars on several fronts, seeking to replenish its dwindling numbers with a chemo-virus that instantly reanimates the corpses of its fallen soldiers.

But the virus ends up finding its way out of the lab and into Rhino's, a small-town Nebraska underground strip club presided over by the obnoxious Ian Essko (Robert Englund). There, it infects its star attraction, the Nietzsche-reading Kat (Jameson), and turns her into a writhing, flesh-eating sensation.

Stripping away all the lame political satire and cutting to the chase, there's admittedly something perversely effective about Jameson and company strutting their undead stuff against the appropriate death metal soundtrack.

It all serves as a warm-up to the main event -- a garish silicone and latex-charged zombie-stripper smackdown that can best be described as George Romero-meets-Russ Meyer with a nod to the 1972 Herschell Gordon Lewis cult classic The Gore Gore Girls.

In the process, writer-director-cinematographer Lee (The Slaughter) just might have stumbled onto something bankable.

Call it strip-quease.

See also

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