A young down on his luck resident of hell (Sammy Davis Jr.) is given a chance to redeem himself by signing up a down on his luck retail accountant to sell his soul to Lucifer (Christopher Lee).

Director:

Writers:

(story), (screenplay) | 3 more credits »
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Sammy
...
...
Burnett J. Emerson
...
Dennis Crawford
...
Bligh
Emily Yancy ...
Chelsea
...
Frances Emerson
Alan Manson ...
Mr. Marley
...
Desk Sergeant
Byron Webster ...
...
Owen Bush ...
Tom
...
Don Ross ...
Eddie
Lila Teigh ...
Woman
Edit

Storyline

A bumbling assistant to Satan (Sammy Davis Jr.) hasn't gotten a soul for him for 1400 years. He gets one last chance when he's assigned get the soul of a down and out retail department store accountant (Jack Klugman). Written by frankfob2@yahoo.com

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Sammy at his comic best as the most inept Devil's messenger this side of Hades!

Genres:

Comedy | Fantasy

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

14 February 1973 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Pobre diablo  »

Filming Locations:


Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Rejected NBC pilot has some '70s kitsch value...little else
20 August 2010 | by (las vegas, nv) – See all my reviews

Sammy Davis Jr. mugs outrageously in this tepid TV-made comedy which the producers hoped would evolve into a weekly series. Davis is one of Satan's disciples from "down there" who believes an overlooked accountant in San Francisco is ready to sell his soul to the Devil in exchange for success. The main problem with this Faustian teleplay (poorly-written by Earl Barret and Arne Sultan from a treatment by Barret, Sultan, and Richard Baer) is that eager salesman Sammy is bestowed with no special powers other than the occasional "Bewitched"-like entrances and exits. Since client Jack Klugman has been promised a life of luxury, it's never made clear how Davis will actually provide this for him (they empty out a department store--in a misguided bid for revenge--with help from other clients, who don't appear to gain anything from this exhausting, thankless venture). Christopher Lee is good (and almost unrecognizable) as the Prince of Darkness, Jack Klugman is as smooth as ever, but Sammy Davis is trying too hard. Bereft of an accomplished comedic actor's canny sense of timing, Davis wings it--often relying on painful exaggeration to get through a scene. The star looks out of his element, and is at times distinctly uncomfortable in front of the camera. The production is fine (with a cushy-looking Hades), but the pacing is too slow and the laugh-lines ever infrequent.


5 of 9 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?