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The Best Child Performances in Movie History — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best Child Performances in Movie History — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of “The Florida Project,” which has just started its platform release across the country, what is the greatest child performance in a film?

Jordan Hoffman (@JHoffman), The Guardian, Vanity Fair

I can agonize over this question or I can go at this Malcolm Gladwell “Blink”-style. My answer is Tatum O’Neal in “Paper Moon.” She’s just so funny and tough, which of course makes the performance all the more heartbreaking. She won the freaking Oscar at age 10 for this and I’d really love to give a more deep cut response, but why screw around? Paper Moon is a perfect film and she is the lynchpin.
See full article at Indiewire »

Gifted review – real issues turned into gooey fantasy

Plot contrivances and a copout ending compromise a film that tries to tackle the issue of a child prodigy caught up in family battles

There are one or two first-act laughs and nice moments in this spirited heartwarmer from screenwriter Tom Flynn, once much admired in script form on the 2014 Black List of unproduced screenplays. Yet the interesting touches give way to unconvincing contrivances and a final copout. Marc Webb (of The Amazing Spider-Man and (500) Days of Summer) directs. Chris Evans plays Frank, a hunky, beardedly handsome single guy in Florida with the entirely preposterous Kevin-Costner-ish job of “fixing boats”. His former job is, incidentally, no less implausible – disillusioned college professor. Frank is now legal guardian to his orphaned niece, Mary, who at seven years old is a brilliant maths whiz, and so was her troubled mum whom we see in a photo with a super-brainy short haircut. Young Mary
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Netflix Will Release Unseen Orson Welles Film The Other Side of The Wind

In what can only be described as a major win for the digital streaming platform, the previously unfinished and unreleased final film by legendary filmmaker Orson Welles will finally reach audiences, courtesy of Netflix. The Other Side Of The Wind has languished in locked rooms in Paris for four decades, as a variety of producers have attempted to negotiate acceptable deals with the Welles Estate. Now, producer Filip Jan Rymsza (Sangue Azul) has succeeded, striking a deal that will see the completion of editing and a global Netflix release, as he explained to Wellesnet.

“Everything is signed. All the deals are fully closed, both the Netflix deal and all of the rights deals. Everything we have done for the past year and a half has been gruelling, but that’s finally over and now we get to be creative and finally bring this film to life.”

The Other Side Of The Wind
See full article at We Got This Covered »

‘Logan’ Composer Marco Beltrami on R-Rated Wolverine Minimalist Score

‘Logan’ Composer Marco Beltrami on R-Rated Wolverine Minimalist Score
Hugh Jackman and director James Mangold both wanted to end the Wolverine saga on a grace note. The fact that it’s uncompromisingly brutal (fully justifying its R-rating) only reinforces the final salvation. It’s their version of western classic “Shane,” and the minimalist score from Marco Beltrami (Oscar-nominated for “The Hurt Locker”) hits the right emotional chord.

“I knew it was going to be tricky because the visuals were going to lead and the music played more of a textural role,” Beltrami told IndieWire. “Jim didn’t want a [traditional] thematic score — he wanted an emotionally supportive score. So there was a delicate balance, and I experimented with some unique instruments for it.”

For “The Old Man Logan” theme (which you can listen to below courtesy of Lakeshore Records), this included Hammond organ, glass harmonica, and drum kits. This established the world-weary mood of the mutant hiding out in a
See full article at Indiewire »

Richard Portman, ‘Star Wars’ Sound Engineer and 11-Time Oscar Nominee, Dies at 82

Richard Portman, ‘Star Wars’ Sound Engineer and 11-Time Oscar Nominee, Dies at 82
Sound engineer Richard Portman, who received 11 Academy Award nominations and won for his work on Michael Cimino’s “The Deer Hunter,” died on Saturday at his home in Tallahassee, Fla. He was 82.

“He was an icon of his craft of motion picture sound re-recording, recognized with the highest honors of his field,” his daughter Jennifer Portman wrote on her Facebook page. “He was eccentric, irreverent, and real.”

Portman worked on nearly 200 movies and mixed the sound for George Lucas’ “Star Wars.”

Portman received two Oscar sound nominations in 1973 for Francis Ford Coppola’s “The Godfather” and Michael Ritchie’s “The Candidate.” He was also double-nominated in 1974 for Peter Bogdanovich’s “Paper Moon” and Mike Nichols’ “The Day of the Dolphin.”

Portman received his first nom in 1971 for “Kotch,” directed by Jack Lemmon. He was also up for Oscars for Mel Brooks’ “Young Frankenstein,” Herbert Ross’ “Funny Lady,” Michael Apted’s “Coal Miner’s Daughter,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Richard Portman, 'Star Wars,' 'The Godfather' and 'Nashville' Sound Man, Dies at 82

Richard Portman, 'Star Wars,' 'The Godfather' and 'Nashville' Sound Man, Dies at 82
Richard Portman, the accomplished sound man who collected 11 Oscar nominations and won for his work on Michael Cimino's The Deer Hunter, has died. He was 82.

Portman, whose prolific list of credits includes Carnal Knowledge (1971), The Godfather (1972), Paper Moon (1973), Star Wars (1977) and Body Heat (1981), died Saturday at his home in Tallahassee, Fla., his daughter, Jennifer Portman, confirmed to The Hollywood Reporter. He had recently suffered a broken hip from a fall.

A perfectionist and rerecording mixing specialist, Porter received a pair of Oscar sound nominations in 1973 for his work on Francis Ford Coppola's The...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Richard Portman, 'Star Wars,' 'The Godfather' and 'Nashville' Sound Man, Dies at 82

Richard Portman, the accomplished sound man who collected 11 Oscar nominations and won for his work on Michael Cimino's The Deer Hunter, has died. He was 82.

Portman, whose prolific list of credits includes Carnal Knowledge (1971), The Godfather (1972), Paper Moon (1973), Star Wars (1977) and Body Heat (1981), died Saturday at his home in Tallahassee, Fla., his daughter, Jennifer Portman, confirmed to The Hollywood Reporter. He had recently suffered a broken hip from a fall.

A perfectionist and rerecording mixing specialist, Porter received a pair of Oscar sound nominations in 1973 for his work on Francis Ford Coppola's The...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

James Mangold Talks Logan at 20th Century Fox’s Genre Showcase, Read Our Impressions of the First 42 Minutes

In December at their 2017 Genre Showcase event, 20th Century Fox previewed the first 42 minutes of Logan, the eagerly awaited final chapter of the Wolverine saga. Daily Dead was in attendance at the event, and to give readers a big idea of what to expect, we have highlights from director James Mangold’s comments at the event, as well as our impressions of the intense footage that was shown.

After appearing as the character in now nine films (including his X-Men: First Class cameo) Hugh Jackman teams up once again with director James Mangold to bring his run as the “Mutant Formerly Known As Weapon X” to an end.

The two last brought the character to the screen in 2013 with The Wolverine, when original director Darren Aronofsky bowed out after a lengthy pre-production phase. The results were mostly positive, but moments felt hamstrung by superhero movie clichés, such as the out-of-place
See full article at DailyDead »

Entertainment Feature: Top 20 Celebrity Portraits of 2016, By Photographer Joe Arce

Chicago – The year 2016 was a dangerous one to be a famous person. In the past twelve months, one dozen of my former photo subjects passed away, celebrities who at one time or another famously posed for my lens. However, on a positive note, at least photos are forever. Or to quote the immortal words of Pee Wee Herman – “Why don’t you take a picture, it will last longer!”

The ranking of the portraits are based on a combination of the star power wattage of the subjects, the artistic results and the difficulty of landing the quarry…for those budding smart-phone-celebrity-stalkers who may wish to play along at home. So without further adieu, I present my top 20 celebrity portraits of 2016.

20. Peter Bogdanovich

Filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

Here’s to Peter Bogdanovich, who apart from Woody Allen is one of my all-time favorite directors.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

New to Streaming: FilmStruck, ‘The Terrorizers,’ ‘Sausage Party,’ ‘Tickled,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Anthropoid (Sean Ellis)

Throw a dart at a map, and you can make a World War II movie set in whatever place you hit. Of course, pretty much any film about the Good War that doesn’t focus on the American (sometimes British) point of view of the conflict will probably seem “random” to the mainstream; one odd side-effect of Hollywood’s Oscar-baity love of the era. But there
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Jack Reacher: Never Go Back’ Director Talks Importance of Strong Female Characters in Blockbusters

‘Jack Reacher: Never Go Back’ Director Talks Importance of Strong Female Characters in Blockbusters
It’s never been easy to put filmmaker Edward Zwick into a box. The multi-hyphenate has long eschewed sticking to just one genre and even one medium. He helped launch seminal television series like “Thirtysomething” (which he co-created alongside long-time partner Marshall Herskovitz) and “My So-Called Life” (which the pair executive produced) to the small screen, while also directing historical epics like “Glory” and “Defiance,” modern classics like “Courage Under Fire” and “Blood Diamond” and even the odd romantic comedy — or two: Zwick helmed “Love & Other Drugs” and the original “About Last Night…” feature.

Zwick has done it all, but with his latest film, “Jack Reacher: Never Go Back,” he’s managed to do something new: Try his hand at a bone-breaking action sequel, featuring America’s ass-kicking sweetheart in the title role. Zwick and Tom Cruise have worked together before, thanks to the 2003’s epic “The Last Samurai,” and
See full article at Indiewire »

Interview: Director Icon Peter Bogdanovich Honored at 52nd Chicago International Film Festival

Chicago – If Peter Bogdanovich had only been a film writer and critic, he still would have made a major contribution to cinema culture. But he also chose to direct, and besides producing arguably one of the best American films ever made (“The Last Picture Show”), he continues to work and fulfill his creative vision.

Bogdanovich was honored at the 52nd Chicago International Film Festival with a Gold Hugo Career Lifetime Achievement designation, which was augmented with a magnificent documentary about a period in his career called “One Day Since Yesterday: Peter Bogdanovich and the Lost American Film.” The film tells the story of “They All Laughed” (1981), a post modern screwball comedy starring Audrey Hepburn, John Ritter and Dorothy Stratten. Bogdanovich was in a relationship with Stratten during the production of the film, and she was murdered by her ex-husband while the film was being edited. The tragedy, the prescience of
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Preview: First Week of Films at 52nd Chicago International Film Festival

Chicago – It’s Week One of the 52nd Chicago International Film Festival, and with so many film opportunities to experience, what are some of the highlights? The intrepid film reviewers of HollywoodChicago.com has been sampling the cinema fare for the first week, and offers the following capsule summaries.

HollywoodChicago.com reviewers Jon Espino (Je) and Patrick McDonald (Pm) has taken in the previews, and offer these recommendations for the first week of the festival. For a Pdf connection to the complete schedule, click here.

“The Confessions” (Italy/France)

’The Confessions,’ Directed by Roberto Ando

Photo credit: Chicago International Film Festival

The world is in fiscal meltdown, and a G8 summit of the world’s greatest economists is taking place in a remote coastal resort in Germany. One of economists has invited an Italian monk to the meetings, in order to make a confession. When that vital world leader turns up dead the next morning,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

American Honey – Review

While most of us have already unpacked from our Summer travels, pushing those suitcases to the back of the closet, the movies make road trips a year-round activity, and a source for many screen stories. There are travel tales from Hollywood’s Golden Age, like It Happened One Night and, of course, Sullivan’S Travels. And when the young rebels took over in the late 60’s and 70’s we got more classics like Easy Rider and Scarecrow . Now it’s time to “hit the bricks” once more, with a considerably younger set of travelers. But it’s no vacation, they’re working hard, playing hard, and driving hard. Their lives are far from sweet in American Honey.

The heroine of Honey is almost twenty year-old Star (Sasha Lane). We first see her “dumpster diving” along with her boyfriend’s grade school-aged son and daughter. As they lug their “haul” down the street,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Taika Waititi interview: Hunt For The Wilderpeople, Thor 3

Ryan Lambie Sep 19, 2016

Writer-director Taika Waititi talks to us about his new film Hunt For The Wilderpeople, weird sermons, Thor 3 and more...

Whether they're vampires dealing with modern life in Wellington or a group of kids growing up by the sea in the 80s, Taika Waititi's films revel in the quirky details of their characters. In his films Eagle Vs Shark, Boy and What We Do In The Shadows, Waititi finds delicious moments of humour in the mundane and everyday: a geeky couple bonding over their mutual love of videogames, or, in his latest film, Hunt For The Wilderpeople, a profoundly odd sermon.

In Wilderpeople, Barry Crump's book Wild Pork And Watercress is reimagined as an oddball road-trip drama about a disadvantaged city kid (Julian Dennison) who finds himself travelling through the wilds of New Zealand with a cantankerous foster uncle played by Sam Neill. It's a charming,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Peter Bogdanovich, Lydia Hearst Starring in ‘Morning Has Broken’ (Exclusive)

Peter Bogdanovich, Lydia Hearst Starring in ‘Morning Has Broken’ (Exclusive)
Peter Bogdanovich and Lydia Hearst are starring in the crime drama “Morning Has Broken” with shooting planned for later this year in Los Angeles.

Gena Vazquez and Luis Sinibaldi of Legacy Entertainment Partners LLC is producing. Matthew Wilder is directing from his own screenplay based upon the true story of a young runaway girl who moves in with a seemingly harmless and famous composer. All seems perfectly normal until his dark side unleashes a chain reaction of ghastly events.

“This macabre tale is based upon an anecdote someone told me a few years ago – one that is, horrifyingly, quite true,” Wilder said. “I think our treatment of this ‘True Hollywood Story’ will really impact people: to quote Pauline Kael about another yarn, ‘It’s the kind of movie where things turn out so much worse than you imagined that you have to laugh.’”

Wilder is at the Toronto International Film
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Mel Brooks: Why 'Blazing Saddles' Is the 'Funniest Movie Ever Made'

Mel Brooks: Why 'Blazing Saddles' Is the 'Funniest Movie Ever Made'
"It's a good thing you're in New York and I'm in Los Angeles then," Mel Brooks says, before howling with laughter. He's just been informed that, as preparation for getting the 90-year-old filmmaker on the phone, the interviewer he's speaking to has consumed a large amount of black coffee and baked beans — the same combination that fuels the notorious, and extremely noisy campfire sequence in Blazing Saddles. "Actually, three thousand miles between us might not be enough — it depends on the coffee. There are easier ways to get in the mood to talk to me,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

The Top Ten Funny Ladies of the Movies

The recent box office success of The Boss firmly establishes Melissa McCarthy as the current queen of movie comedies (Amy Schumer could be a new contender after an impressive debut last Summer with Trainwreck), but let us think back about those other funny ladies of filmdom. So while we’re enjoying the female reboot/re-imagining of Ghostbusters and those Bad Moms, here’s a top ten list that will hopefully inspire lots of laughter and cause you to search out some classic comedies. It’s tough to narrow them down to ten, but we’ll do our best, beginning with… 10. Eve Arden The droll Ms. Arden represents the comic sidekicks who will attempt to puncture the pomposity of the leading ladies with a well-placed wisecrack (see also the great Thelma Ritter in Rear Window). Her career began in the early 1930’s with great bit roles in Stage Door and Dancing Lady.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Girls Gone Wild -- Favorite Bad Girl Oscar Winners

Kieran, here. We've been celebrating Girls Gone Wild this month at The Film Experience. If you haven't already done so, make sure to check out Team Experience's wonderful relay-style Thelma & Louise 25th anniversary retrospective. 

As the month comes to a close, it felt fitting to take a look back at some of the Best Oscar-winning "bad girl" star turns. Here are 11 of the juiciest...

Honorable Mention:

Cristal Connors in Showgirls (Gina Gershon)

Should have been nominated. Very possibly should have won. Haters be damned.

Top Ten Oscar Winning Bad Girl Roles

10. Addie Loggins in Paper Moon (Tatum O'Neal - Best Supporting Actress 1973)

A charismatic yet unsentimental child performance that perfectly nails the tone of its film. The only complaint is that she wasn't promoted to lead Actress where (judging by that roster) she very well could have contended.

9. Barbara Grahame in I Want to Live! (Susan Hayward - Best Actress 1958)

Delightfully over-the-top and melodramatic.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Video Essay. Tensions: On John Cassavetes’ "Gloria" (1980)

  • MUBI
The thirteenth entry in an on-going series of audiovisual essays by Cristina Álvarez López and Adrian Martin. Mubi will be showing John Cassavetes' Gloria (1980) March 23 - April 22 in the United Kingdom.You can tell a lot about filmmakers and their attitudes from the way they choose to frame a child—especially when there is also an adult in the same scene. To whom does the scene pay attention at any given moment? Whose viewpoint is covered? Who is privileged in the scene? Whose position is occupied by the camera? Shall we go the conventional shot/reverse shot route of looking down at the child from a high-angle (i.e., the senior Pov), and gazing up from a low-angle at the adult?John Cassavetes’s Gloria (1980) offers a veritable treatise on these questions—and its response is quite unlike any other film that centers on a roughly similar relationship, from
See full article at MUBI »
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