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The 7 Best Movies Coming to Netflix in November 2017

  • Indiewire
The 7 Best Movies Coming to Netflix in November 2017
It’s a good thing that Netflix already has the “Gilmore Girls” for all of those sweet Thanksgiving vibes, because the streaming giant is coming down from that Halloween sugar high in a bad way and following last month’s blockbuster slate with a relatively unremarkable roster of new additions. Proving that there isn’t much rhyme or reason behind when they’re able to upload new movies (it’s hard to curate around contract rights), the platform’s latest batch of titles is heavy on horror movies and light on seasonal fare.

Still, it’s not all bad news for those of you who might be looking for something to stream while you’re home for the holidays. Comfort watches like “Casper” and “Field of Dreams” are perfect things to put on when you’re immobilized by a stomach full of turkey, and you can even go for an
See full article at Indiewire »

Nine Inch Nails’ Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross Drop Creepy Cover of ‘Halloween’ Theme

Nine Inch Nails’ Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross Drop Creepy Cover of ‘Halloween’ Theme
To celebrate the Oct. 20 release of horror film auteur John Carpenter’s anthology of newly recorded themes from his films, Nine Inch NailsTrent Reznor and Atticus Ross have released a new version of the theme from Carpenter’s iconic 1978 film “Halloween.” The remainder of the tracks on the album were recorded by Carpenter — who directed and wrote the music for films including “The Fog,” “Escape From New York” and “Assault on Precinct 17.”

Reznor says, “I clearly remember my friends and I at 13 years old conning our parents into letting us see ‘Halloween’ when it came out in 1978. We left the theater forever changed. We were damaged and scarred, with the shit genuinely scared out of us and that theme stuck firmly in our heads. John Carpenter, it’s your fault that I turned out the way I did.”

Speaking about the new version, John Carpenter says, “Moody and dark, Trent Reznor and [link
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Illustrated Man

Ray Bradbury adapted to the screen is always something to check out; this Jack Smight- directed trio of stories bound together by a mystery man wearing the graffiti of the title at least works up a little ethereal-cereal excitement. Husband and wife Rod Steiger and Claire Bloom spout ominous dialogue as they face various futuristic threats.

The Illustrated Man

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1969 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 103 min. / Street Date September 19, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Rod Steiger, Claire Bloom, Robert Drivas, Don Dubbins, Jason Evers, Tim Weldon, Christine Matchett

Cinematography: Philip H. Lathrop

Art Direction: Joel Schiller

Film Editor: Archie Marshek

Original Music: Jerry Goldsmith

Written by Howard B. Kreitsek from the book by Ray Bradbury

Produced by Howard B. Kreitsek, Ted Mann

Directed by Jack Smight

Ray Bradbury must have had some frustrating times as a screenwriter, although the three times I saw him in person he never
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

'Diva!': Film Review | Venice 2017

'Diva!': Film Review | Venice 2017
Though she’s not quite the household name that her contemporaries Anna Magnani and Alida Valli are, Italian actress Valentina Cortese had an impressive career both on screen and on stage. Besides her romantic and professional relationship with Italian theater legend Giorgio Strehler, she worked with such film luminaries as Robert Wise, Jules Dassin, Joseph L. Mankiewicz, Terry Gilliam, William Dieterle — as well as Fellini, Antonioni and Truffaut — even garnering an Oscar nomination for her supporting part as an alcoholic and aging actress in Truffaut’s Day for Night.

Italian director Francesco Patierno pays homage to her life, talent and...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Why Jeanne Moreau’s Death Represents the Decline of French Film in America

  • Indiewire
Iconic actress Jeanne Moreau’s death this week at 89 received muted American coverage, with remembrances that hardly captured Moreau’s essential presence and influence in world cinema. Overshadowed by the passing of Sam Shepard the day before (more contemporary, American, prominent in multiple fields, and younger), she received back-page obituaries in major papers. Her lack of any Oscar nominations, or a deserved honorary award, didn’t help the cause.

Even more unfortunate is the treatment of her death reflects American audiences’ ever-increasing disinterest in French-language film. Jeanne Moreau is significant for her transcendent artistry and the directors with whom she worked, but she also represented the iconic qualities of her country’s cinema.

Though the boom in “art houses” (a term popularized in the late 1940s) came more from Italian films (“Rome, Open City,” “Shoe Shine,” and particularly “Bicycle Thief”), French film became a steady part of the subtitled market by the mid-1950s.
See full article at Indiewire »

Locarno Festival contender 'Easy' scores deals

Locarno Festival contender 'Easy' scores deals
Exclusive: Quirky road trip comedy follows journey from Italy to small village in Carpathian Mountains in Ukraine.

Paris-based sales company Premium Films has announced first deals on Italian director Andrea Magnani’s road trip comedy Easy (pictured) ahead of its premiere in the Filmmakers of the Present competition at Locarno.

The debut feature has sold to China (Lemon Tree), Turkey (Fabula) and Ukraine (Multi Media Distribution) ahead of the screening. Tucker Film will release the picture in Italy on August 31.

Rising Italian comedy actor Nicola Nocella stars as a Isidoro, a former teenage go-cart champion going by the nickname of Easy, who has fallen prey to depression and obesity in adulthood.

His dynamic, ultra-successful brother Filo gives Easy a challenge that will get him behind the wheel again: to drive a coffin from Italy to a small village in the Carpathian Mountains in Ukraine.

It is an Italian-Ukrainian co-production involving Kiev-based Fresh Production Group alongside Italy’s Pilgrim
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Criterion Now – Episode 17 – 45 Years, Cannes 2017, Abbas Kiarostami, David Lynch

Aaron and two new guests, Jason Beamish and Kyle Reardon, dig into 45 Years, Cannes 2017, David Lynch and a number of other topics. This ended up being an unpopular opinions episode, as we all took some shots against conventional wisdom. Since Kyle is the youngest guest on the podcast, we gave him a list of films to watch, but found that he had quite the art and classic film foundation.

Episode Notes

4:25 – Dumb Game

11:00 – 45 Years

22:45 – Matias Pineiro Closet Picks

29:00 – Cannes 2017

34:30 – Abbas Kiarostami

40:20 – David Lynch

50:00 – Short Takes (Tampopo, Day for Night, Le Cercle Rouge)

56:45 – FilmStruck

Episode Links Nowhere to Run – Kickstarter Film Ruminations – Tampopo MK2 Acquires 20 Abbas Kiarostami Films Matias Pineiro Closet Picks 2017 Cannes Winners Episode Credits Aaron West: Twitter | Website | Letterboxd Jason Beamish: Twitter | Website Kyle Reardon: Twitter | Run Nowhere Criterion Now: Twitter | Facebook Group Criterion Cast: Facebook | Twitter

Music for the show
See full article at CriterionCast »

Cohen Media Group Lands U.S. Rights to Francois Ozon’s ‘L’Amant Double’ (Exclusive)

Cohen Media Group has acquired all North American rights to Francois Ozon’s provocative erotic mystery “L’Amant Double,” one of the most buzzed-about films competing in Cannes.

“L’Amant Double” re-teams the versatile and prolific Ozon with Marine Vatch, the breakthrough star of “Young & Beautiful,” which competed at Cannes in 2013. Vatch stars in “L’Amant Double” opposite Jérémie Renier (“Summer Hours,” “La Promesse”) and Jacqueline Bisset (“Day for Night”).

Vatch stars as Chloé, a fragile young woman who falls in love with her psychoanalyst, Paul (Renier). She eventually moves in with Paul but soon discovers he is concealing a part of his identity.

The North America deal was negotiated by John Kochman, executive VP of Cohen Media Group, and Nicolas Brigaud-Robert, co-producer of the film and partner at Films Distribution, which is handling international rights for the picture.

“Ozon belongs to a rare breed of French auteurs who are
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Rock’n’Roll’ Review: Marion Cotillard and Guillaume Canet Play Themselves In Silly and Surreal French Satire — Tribeca 2017

  • Indiewire
‘Rock’n’Roll’ Review: Marion Cotillard and Guillaume Canet Play Themselves In Silly and Surreal French Satire — Tribeca 2017
The first thing you need to accept about “Rock’n’Roll” — an endearingly bizarre showbiz satire in which actor and filmmaker Guillaume Canet (“Tell No One”) plays a hyper-neurotic version of himself who suffers one of the worst mid-life crises since “8 1/2” — is that the movie never asks you to feel sorry for the guy who goes home to Marion Cotillard. On the contrary, Canet’s new comedy (his first outing behind the camera since his English-language debut flopped in 2013) is a bruised, self-deprecating spectacle that finds the French celebrity mocking himself for the fragility of his own ego.

Yes, the movie argues that stars might sense their expiration dates approaching more acutely than the rest of us, and yes, it dwells on how difficult it is to know that everyone is watching you and judging you and measuring you against your former self. Still, “Rock’n’Roll” is able to
See full article at Indiewire »

Catherine Breillat’s Metacinema

  • MUBI
Mubi's retrospective, Catherine Breillat, Auteur of Porn?, is showing April 4 - June 3, 2017 in Germany.Sex Is ComedyThroughout her career, Catherine Breillat has provided viewers with a long-form meta-cinema experience. While metacinema is as old as the medium itself, since her debut feature A Real Young Girl in 1976, Breillat has developed a distinct form of it: one that collapses ‘autobiographical’ material, various artistic sensibilities, and the process of filmmaking itself.Like dozens of other English words—such as ‘aesthetic’ or ‘abject’—the word ‘meta’ has been largely misused or misapplied with regard to the film and literary criticism. Regarding the consumption of fiction, the appropriate use of the term 'metafiction,' 'metafilm,' et cetera, has its basis in the Greek meta, which does not translate directly into English but can be understood as a preposition similar to the English word ‘about’ (‘having to do with,’ or ‘on the subject of’). Metafiction is therefore,
See full article at MUBI »

Movie Poster of the Week: Jean-Pierre Léaud in Posters

  • MUBI
Starting this week, the Film Society of Lincoln Center hosts a retrospective of the 57-year career of one of the most iconic figures of modern cinema: Jean-Pierre Léaud. The child who grew up and grew old before our eyes, Léaud will forever be associated with one film above all, François Truffaut’s The 400 Blows, made when he was only 14, and its character, Antoine Doinel, who he, in many ways, created. In a letter to his friend Helen Scott in 1962 Truffaut wrote, “I would prefer a film to change its meaning along the way rather than have an actor ill at ease. Jean-Pierre wasn’t the character I had intended for The 400 Blows.” When the Film Society first fêted Léaud, in 1994, in the series “Growing Up with Jean-Pierre Léaud: Nouvelle Vague’s Wild Child” (programmed by my future wife no less), the actor had only just turned 50. Léaud
See full article at MUBI »

Classic French Film Festival Continues This Weekend – Day For Night, Eyes Without A Face, and Paris Belongs To Us

The Ninth Annual Robert Classic French Film Festival — co-presented by Cinema St. Louis and the Webster University Film Series started last Friday and continues the next two weekends — The Classic French Film Festival celebrates St. Louis’ Gallic heritage and France’s cinematic legacy. The featured films span the decades from the 1920s through the mid-1990s, offering a revealing overview of French cinema.

All films are screened at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood).

The fest is annually highlighted by significant restorations, which this year includes films by two New Wave masters: Jacques Rivette’s first feature, “Paris Belongs to Us,” and François Truffaut’s cinephilic love letter, “Day for Night.” The fest also provides one of the few opportunities available in St. Louis to see films projected the old-school, time-honored way, with both Alain Resnais’ “Last Year at Marienbad” and Robert Bresson’s “Au hasard Balthazar” screening from 35mm prints.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Classic French Film Festival Continues This Weekend – Cleo From 5 To 7, 35mm Prints of Last Year At Marienbad and Au Hazard Balthasar

The Ninth Annual Robert Classic French Film Festival — co-presented by Cinema St. Louis and the Webster University Film Series started last Friday and continues the next two weekends — The Classic French Film Festival celebrates St. Louis’ Gallic heritage and France’s cinematic legacy. The featured films span the decades from the 1920s through the mid-1990s, offering a revealing overview of French cinema.

All films are screened at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood).

The fest is annually highlighted by significant restorations, which this year includes films by two New Wave masters: Jacques Rivette’s first feature, “Paris Belongs to Us,” and François Truffaut’s cinephilic love letter, “Day for Night.” The fest also provides one of the few opportunities available in St. Louis to see films projected the old-school, time-honored way, with both Alain Resnais’ “Last Year at Marienbad” and Robert Bresson’s “Au hasard Balthazar” screening from 35mm prints.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Cinema St. Louis’ Classic French Film Festival Kicks Off Friday with Au Revoir Les Enfants

The Ninth Annual Robert Classic French Film Festival — co-presented by Cinema St. Louis and the Webster University Film Series starts this Friday, March 10th. — The Classic French Film Festival celebrates St. Louis’ Gallic heritage and France’s cinematic legacy. The featured films span the decades from the 1920s through the mid-1990s, offering a revealing overview of French cinema.

All films are screened at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood).

The fest is annually highlighted by significant restorations, which this year includes films by two New Wave masters: Jacques Rivette’s first feature, “Paris Belongs to Us,” and François Truffaut’s cinephilic love letter, “Day for Night.” The fest also provides one of the few opportunities available in St. Louis to see films projected the old-school, time-honored way, with both Alain Resnais’ “Last Year at Marienbad” and Robert Bresson’s “Au hasard Balthazar” screening from 35mm prints. Even more traditional,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Beauty vs Beast: Direct to the Death

Jason from Mnpp here - for this week's "Beauty vs Beast" we're celebrating what would have been the 85th birthday of one of the most important figures in cinema, the French critic turned director François Truffaut. What's your favorite Truffaut film? I know the "right" answer is The 400 Blows (or possibly Jules & Jim) (or maybe Day For Night) but I've always had a real soft spot for Mississippi Mermaid - Catherine Deneueve and Jean-Paul Belmondo all sweaty and sexy ? Sign me up.

But it's a different sexy pair I'm going to focus in on for this week's contest -- namely the director himself with his seminal book (recently turned documentary) Hitchcock / Truffaut, which linked him forever with the "Master of Suspense" himself. That's right - I found a way to make this series about Hitchcock again! Life finds a way, you guys.

Previously Last week Dario Argento's candy-colored
See full article at FilmExperience »

Cinema St. Louis’ Classic French Film Festival March 10th -26th at Webster University

The Ninth Annual Robert Classic French Film Festival — co-presented by Cinema St. Louis and the Webster University Film Series — celebrates St. Louis’ Gallic heritage and France’s cinematic legacy. The featured films span the decades from the 1920s through the mid-1990s, offering a revealing overview of French cinema.

The fest is annually highlighted by significant restorations, which this year includes films by two New Wave masters: Jacques Rivette’s first feature, “Paris Belongs to Us,” and François Truffaut’s cinephilic love letter, “Day for Night.” The fest also provides one of the few opportunities available in St. Louis to see films projected the old-school, time-honored way, with both Alain Resnais’ “Last Year at Marienbad” and Robert Bresson’s “Au hasard Balthazar” screening from 35mm prints. Even more traditional, we also offer a silent film with live music, and audiences are sure to delight in the Poor People of Paris
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

‘It’s Only the End of the World’ UK Trailer: Marion Cotillard Leads Xavier Dolan’s Grand Prix-Winning Family Drama

  • Indiewire
‘It’s Only the End of the World’ UK Trailer: Marion Cotillard Leads Xavier Dolan’s Grand Prix-Winning Family Drama
Xavier Dolan’s latest family drama “It’s Only the End of the World” made its world premiere at the 2016 Cannes Film Festival, where it garnered polarizing reviews and won the coveted Grand Prix award. It spent all last year on the festival circuit, screening at the Toronto International Film Festival, the London Film Festival, AFI Fest and more. It also recently made the Oscar shortlist for Best Foreign Language Film despite not currently having U.S. distribution. Though it’s already been released in France, it will finally hit UK theaters next month. Watch the UK trailer for the film below.

Read More: ‘It’s Only the End of the World’ Reviews: Xavier Dolan’s Latest Is a ‘Total Misfire’

Dolan’s sixth feature film follows Louis (Gaspard Ulliel), a terminally ill writer who returns home after 12 years to announce his impending death to his family. It co-stars Nathalie Baye
See full article at Indiewire »

How Often Do Foreign-Language Films Score Screenwriting Oscar Nominations Or Wins?

  • Scott Feinberg
Toni Erdmann’ (Courtesy: Tiff)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

It’s not too often that foreign-language films get recognized for anything at the Oscars beyond the best foreign-language film category — but it does happen. And, believe it or not, it happens more for best original screenplay and best adapted screenplay than many other categories. A prime example of that is Toni Erdmann, Germany’s submission this year that is proving to be a cross-category threat, which could score a nomination — or a win — for its writing.

The story of Toni Erdmann — which has a solid Rotten Tomatoes score of 91% — follows a father who is trying to reconnect with his adult daughter after the death of his dog. It sounds simple enough but, of course, the two couldn’t be more unalike. The film premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016 and where it won the Fipresci Prize. Since then, it
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Luxbox secures Us, French sales on 'By The Time It Gets Dark'

Luxbox secures Us, French sales on 'By The Time It Gets Dark'
Exclusive: Film exploring legacy of Thailand’s 1976 Thammasat University massacre scores international deals.

Paris-based sales outfit Luxbox has unveiled a fresh round of sales on Thai director Anocha Suwichakornpong’s timely political film By The Time It Gets Dark (Dao Khanong), including to New York-based world cinema distributor KimStim for the Us.

Exploring the legacy of Thailand’s 1976 Thammasat University massacre, in which at least 46 students were killed by government troops and paramilitary forces, the film intertwines the lives of a number of characters touched by the event from a former female political activist to a young documentary filmmaker and a pop-star.

“We’re thrilled to be bringing Anocha Suwichakornpong’s mesmerising and haunting second feature to Us audiences. With Dao Khanong, Anocha proves she deserves equal respect to other world renowned Thai filmmakers such as Apichatpong Weerasethakul, and Pen-ek Ratanaruang,” said KimStim founder Ian Stimler.

It is Suwichakornpong’s second solo feature film after her 2009 work
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Aphex Twin Returns With New SoundCloud Upload

After garnering rave reviews for his stint at Day For Night festival this month, Aphex Twin has returned over the weekend to upload a new track to his SoundCloud account user18081971. The nonsensically titled “tnodvood104” serves as the notorious producer’s first upload to the channel in four months, and follows up the Cheetah Ep he released over the summer.

“Tnodvood104” ranks among Aphex Twin’s classic ambient techno material, led by an old school drum machine rhythm coupled with haunting ambience and metallic noise samples. As the track pushes forward, a discordant choir joins the mix, bringing a haunting edge to the music as the simple beat drifts on.

It’s interesting to note that the word “Voodoo” has been written under the track’s genre tag, which suggests the possibility that Aphex Twin will surface on the lineup for next year’s Voodoo Fest. For now that’s the only clue we have,
See full article at We Got This Covered »
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