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Chadwick Boseman Explains What Sets Black Panther Apart From Other McU Films

Let it be known that Black Panther is not your average superhero movie.

Sure, there are elements of an origin story sprinkled throughout Ryan Coogler’s McU spinoff, while its titular king runs about in a “bulletproof catsuit,” but beneath the surface is an inspired, nuanced and, crucially, Afrocentric tale of heroism and family, as Chadwick Boseman’s grieving T’Challa takes his seat on the throne.

What follows is a sweeping, operatic family drama, one critics are calling the most accomplished addition to the Marvel Cinematic Universe to date. As for what sets Black Panther apart from its superhero peers, Boseman believes the McU owes a great debt to Ryan Coogler, the director behind the lens.

I feel like it’s definitely a Ryan Coogler film. There are certain choices that are made that are distinctly his stamp on it… If we start talking about sequels — if we do four of them,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Liam Neeson movies: 12 greatest films ranked from worst to best, including ‘Schindler’s List,’ ‘Kinsey,’ ‘Silence’

  • Gold Derby
Liam Neeson movies: 12 greatest films ranked from worst to best, including ‘Schindler’s List,’ ‘Kinsey,’ ‘Silence’
Liam Neeson’s recent film release “The Commuter” opened this month to a somewhat strong box office but has not fared as well with reactions, receiving only a 58% approval rating from critics and a 49% approval rating from audiences. While this latest film will probably not be remembered as one of Neeson’s best, the actor has an esteemed film resume that he has cultivated in his nearly 40-year career.

Born in Northern Ireland, the actor started in the Irish theater before embarking on a film career. He had a small role in the stylish 1981 King Arthur film called “Excalibur” which quickly provided him roles in other films and on television. Neeson struggled a bit in his early days to find substantial roles and was often cast based on his good looks and imposing physical appearance. Gradually he began to establish himself as a serious actor worthy of deeper roles.

SEESteven
See full article at Gold Derby »

10 Things You Didn’t Know about the Movie “Mean Streets”

Mean Streets lives up to its name since the entire movie is about the life of Charlie and how he goes about covering for his friend Johnny, who’s a bit of a loose cannon. Charlie also has a huge issue with working for his uncle doing whatever illicit jobs he’s given while still trying to be a good man. It’s kind of ironic that his uncle tells him “honorable men go with honorable men” since his uncle is a loan shark and a political fixer. There’s not a lot of honor on the mean streets when it’s more about survival

10 Things You Didn’t Know about the Movie “Mean Streets
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Playback: Martin McDonagh on ‘Three Billboards’ and an Attraction to Dark Humor

Playback: Martin McDonagh on ‘Three Billboards’ and an Attraction to Dark Humor
Welcome to “Playback,” a Variety podcast bringing you exclusive conversations with the talents behind many of today’s hottest films.

Martin McDonagh is riding a wave this week after his film, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” cleaned up at the Golden Globes (four awards including best picture) and snapped up an impressive nine BAFTA nominations. It’s become one of the most popular films of the Oscar season, and it’s one right in line with McDonagh’s breed of dark humor, which he flexed on previous features “In Bruges” and “Seven Psychopaths,” as well as his Oscar-winning short film “Six Shooter,” not to mention his work for the stage.

Listen to this week’s episode of “Playback” below. New episodes air every Thursday.

Click here for more episodes of “Playback.”

“I was kind of a punk rock kid,” McDonagh says when trying to trace his attraction to dark comedy. “I guess most
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Flickering Myth Film Class: The Audio/Visual depiction of mental breakdown

In the latest instalment of Flickering Myth’s film class, Tom Jolliffe looks at the audio and visual tools a film-maker can effectively use to portray a characters descent into madness…

In previous film classes (which I should say are merely showcases for films that excel in whatever subject springs to my mind before writing) I’ve covered a range of aspects from the technical to the aesthetic and more. However in this instalment I want to delve deeper into character, and in particular the audio and visual tools a film-maker can use in order to effectively portray a descent into madness.

It’s particularly important that these tools are used creatively when the character in question is generally quiet. When he seems inactive until that inevitable moment when he fully unravels into explosive behaviour. I’ve covered films in previous instalments (and other articles) which I could easily have focused on here.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Filmmaking Legends on How New York’s Era of Decay Sparked a Creative Revolution

Filmmaking Legends on How New York’s Era of Decay Sparked a Creative Revolution
In the 1970s and early ’80s, New York City embodied the revolution taking place in American cinema. It was brash and brutal, crude and powerful, sexy and grimey, and had a swagger that was unmistakable.

It was also a low point for the city. The Bronx was burning, crime was rising and city hall was broke. But even as respectable folks fled for the safety of the suburbs, New York became a canvas for talented filmmakers. From “The French Connection” to “Saturday Night Fever,” it posed as the setting of classic films that ushered in a new era of on-screen realism. It was the age of De Niro and Pacino, Scorsese and Lumet, talents who upended the sterile and factory-like approach to making movies that dominated the studio system.

It’s a revolution in filmmaking that’s over. Just as Times Square, the setting of “Taxi Driver,” has been replaced by a fantasyland for tourists, movies
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'The Deuce' Recap: Movin' On Up

'The Deuce' Recap: Movin' On Up
You don't take a walk on the wild side when you watch The Deuce. No, this show's journey through the seedy side of Seventies NYC is more like a leisurely stroll. Co-written by The Wire's David Simon and The Night Of's Richard Price and directed by James Franco himself, this week's episode – “The Principle Is All" – draws strength from that slow and steady rhythm. On paper, it's not really doing anything different than its predecessors: Vinnie, Candy, Lori and Abby all continue their respective learning curves as they
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Martin Scorsese Shares Filmmaking Knowledge With ‘Masterclass’ Course

If you ever wanted to learn a few lessons in filmmaking, director Martin Scorsese is lending his years of cinematic passion and expertise with MasterClass. The director, whose last film was the critically acclaimed Silence, has also helmed Goodfellas, Taxi Driver, Mean Streets, and Casino. "I was excited by this [...]
See full article at Hollywood Outbreak »

The 1970s – The Best Era In Cinema History?

Tom Jolliffe on the 1970s and why it is the best era in cinema history…

There will always be a great deal of debate about the best era for cinema. For my two cents I’ll say with a great deal of assurance that the best period in cinema history was the 1970’s. There was most certainly a transition through that decade which saw the gritty cinema of the late 60’s onward, into the birth of the blockbuster as we know it today.

You could almost split the 70’s into two categories, although I will make some mention of sub-categories like the Blaxploitation period too. On one hand directors were beginning to really move as far from the traditional classic Hollywood production code as they could. Boundaries were being pushed and optimism was being replaced with deeply pessimistic work. It wasn’t all happy endings. Things were getting dark, reflecting
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

'Goodfellas': THR's 1990 Review

'Goodfellas': THR's 1990 Review
On Sept. 19, 1990, Martin Scorsese unveiled his gangster epic Goodfellas in theaters. The film win on to nab a best supporting actor Oscar for Joe Pesci at the 63rd Academy Awards. The Hollywood Reporter's original review is below.

Hollywood has long been fascinated with the gangster. But nobody has ever taken quite the fix on the tribal rites and ethos of the American gangster that Martin Scorsese does in Goodfellas.

This film harkens back to such Scorsese examinations of the volatile urban male as Mean Streets, Taxi Driver and Raging Bull. Only this time he casts his net wider....
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Darren Aronofksy Mourns His Lost ‘Taxi Driver’-Inspired ‘Batman’ Pitch

Darren Aronofksy Mourns His Lost ‘Taxi Driver’-Inspired ‘Batman’ Pitch
Imagine a “Batman” film starring Clint Eastwood driving around Detroit-like Gotham City in a souped up Lincoln Continental. Now imagine it’s a Darren Aronofsky film. As amazing as that sounds, it’s not hard to see why a studio wouldn’t go for it — especially fifteen years ago. When the “Mother!” director heard about the new “Mean Streets” inspired Joker spinoff produced by Martin Scorsese, he couldn’t help but wonder what could have been.

“I think we were basically – whatever it is – 15 years too early. Because I hear the way they’re talking about the Joker movie and that’s exactly – that was my pitch. I was like: we’re going to shoot in East Detroit and East New York. We’re not building Gotham. The Batmobile – I wanted to be a Lincoln Continental with two bus engines in it,” Aronofsky told First Showing. “We were all about
See full article at Indiewire »

Toronto Film Review: Margot Robbie in ‘I, Tonya’

Toronto Film Review: Margot Robbie in ‘I, Tonya’
“I, Tonya,” a riff on the Tonya Harding saga starring Margot Robbie as the infamous figure skater the whole world decided it loved to hate, is a fresh, chancy, and wickedly enjoyable movie. It’s framed as a fake documentary (it opens with the characters being interviewed 20 years later), and it has a tone of poker-faced goofball Americana that suggests a biopic made by the Coen brothers. The movie revels in the sheer woeful ghastly comic horror of what went on during the lead-up to the 1994 Winter Olympic Games in Lillehammer — the smashed knee of Nancy Kerrigan, the whole scheme to undermine her that was even more cracked.

For a while, you may make the mistake of thinking that “I, Tonya” is a joke: a blithe spoof of Tabloid Nation. It is that, yet it’s also built around something piercingly sharp and sincere: Margot Robbie’s canny, live-wire, deeply sympathetic performance. In
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Good Time': How Two Brothers Scuzzed Up Robert Pattinson and Made a Gritty Classic

'Good Time': How Two Brothers Scuzzed Up Robert Pattinson and Made a Gritty Classic
Robert Pattinson can't explain it – he just knew.

It was early 2015, and the Twilight star was now three years removed from Edward Cullen, the iconic vampire heartthrob who made the British actor's name but had also painted him into a corner. Looking to break free, the then-29-year-old star began seeking out daring dramas and working with filmmakers like David Cronenberg, David Michôd, Werner Herzog and James Gray. He was determined to prove that he wasn't just a Ya pinup. And in the midst of that reinvention, Pattinson stumbled upon
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Opening Wednesday At A Theater Or Drive-in Near You: The Shadow Cinema Of The American ‘70S

“All the films in this book share an air of disreputability… I have tried to avoid using the word art about the movies in this book, not just because I didn’t want to inflate my claims for them, but because the word is used far too often to shut down discussion rather than open it up. If something has been acclaimed as art, it’s not just beyond criticism but often seen as above the mere mortals for whom its presumably been made. It’s a sealed artifact that offers no way in. It is as much a lie to claim we can be moved only by what has been given the imprimatur of art as it would be to deny that there are, in these scruffy movies, the very things we expect from art: avenues into human emotion and psychology, or into the character and texture of the time the films were made,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

10 Best Movies to See in August: 'Detroit,' 'The Dark Tower' and More

10 Best Movies to See in August: 'Detroit,' 'The Dark Tower' and More
Ah, the dog-days month of summer moviegoing! This August is pretty light on potential blockbusters (save a certain long-awaited fantasy-Western by one Stephen King), leaving room for a number of counter-programming indie curios worth investigating. Robert Pattinson, Channing Tatum and Aubrey Plaza all do some major-league acting in three respective, remarkably offbeat films; Kathryn Bigelow zeroes in on some historical racial tensions and riots in the 1960s Motor City; and a documentary reckons with more recent ones in Ferguson, Missouri. Here's what you need to see this month.

Beach Rats (Aug.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘The Irishman’: 9 Things You Must Know About Martin Scorsese’s $100 Million ‘Goodfellas’ Reunion

‘The Irishman’: 9 Things You Must Know About Martin Scorsese’s $100 Million ‘Goodfellas’ Reunion
Martin Scorsese’s “Silence” may have been his 28-year-old passion project, but it was mostly ignored by audiences, grossing only $7 million in the U.S. opposite a $40 million budget. Something tells us the same fate won’t meet the director’s next project, which carries an even bigger budget and bigger stars.

Read More: Why Martin Scorsese’s Netflix Deal Is The Future of Cinema (And That’s Ok)

The Irishman” is gearing up for production this summer, and it brings Scorsese back to the genre he helped define in the modern era and reunites him with some of the actors he helped make iconic. Anticipation is sky high (and warranted, given everything we know about the movie). Here are the 9 most essential bits of information you need to know:

1. The Movie is Martin Scorsese’s First Gangster Movie in Over A Decade

Scorsese has built his career on iconic gangster movies,
See full article at Indiewire »

Obsessions

What a great sales hook — a feature film with a Bernard Herrmann music score that we hadn’t heard of. And one of the writers was Martin Scorsese, before Boxcar Bertha and Mean Streets! But wait, it isn’t as simple as that. The new release is more than a little confusing. Its own ad copy first calls this Dutch production ‘obscure,’ and not four sentences later describes it as a ‘classic exploitation film.’

Obsessions

Blu-ray + DVD

Cult Epics

1969 / Color / 1:37 flat full frame (should be widescreen) / 91 min. / Bezeten – Het gat in de muur / Street Date May 9, 2017 / 34.95

Starring: Alexandra Stewart, Dieter Geissler, Tom van Beek, Donald Jones, Elisabeth Versluys, Marijke Boonstra, Vibeke, Michael Krebs, Hasmig Terveen, Fons Rademakers, Victoria Naelin, Adrian Brine, Sara Heyblom.

Cinematography: Frans Bromet, Hubertus Hagen

Film Editor: Henri Rust

Original Music: Bernard Herrmann

Written by Pim de la Parra, Wim Verstappen, Martin Scorsese

Produced by Pim de la Parra,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Week in Movie News: Here's What You Need to Know

Need a quick recap on the past week in movie news? Here are the highlights: Big News Quentin Tarantino has a surprising new project: Quentin Tarantino's next movie will be about the Manson Family murders, and word has it he's looking at Brad Pitt, Jennifer Lawrence, Samuel L. Jackson and Margot Robbie to star, the last as slain actress Sharon Tate. Read more here.   Great News Joe Pesci joins Martin Scorsese's The IrishmanMartin Scorsese's next gangster movie, The Irishman, is turning out to be a Raging Bull-Goodfellas-Casino reunion as Joe Pesci has joined the cast, which already includes Robert De Niro. Meanwhile, Harvey Keitel, who starred with De Niro in Mean Streets and Taxi Driver, is in talks, as are Al...

Read More
See full article at Movies.com »

Richard Linklater Celebrates the Bygone Era of the Video Store

Richard Linklater Celebrates the Bygone Era of the Video Store
The following excerpt serves as the forward to the paperback edition of Tom Roston’s book “I Lost It at the Video Store: A Filmmaker’s Oral History of a Vanished Era,” which is now available here. The new edition features more interviews with younger screen stars, including Paul Dano and Zoe Kazan, as well as new era film visionaries such as Tim League and Burnie Burns.

If you’re a film freak much under the age of 40, you likely have no personal memory of the history of film being anywhere other than at your fingertips. Those of us older than that lived through the last era of “cinematic scarcity.” And it was no joke—I remember putting in for vacation time from work just to be sure I could finally see “Mean Streets”—I saw that it was scheduled to show in a month or so for one night
See full article at Indiewire »

Guillermo Del Toro Really Wants You to See ‘Baby Driver,’ Hails it As ‘An American in Paris’ on ‘Crack Smoke’

Guillermo Del Toro Really Wants You to See ‘Baby Driver,’ Hails it As ‘An American in Paris’ on ‘Crack Smoke’
Baby Driver,” Edgar Wright’s hotly anticipated summer car heist, hits theaters today, and the buzz surrounding the movie has been growing steadily since its SXSW premiere. But there’s at least one person even more excited than we are for the action flick: Guillermo del Toro. The director took to Twitter to unleash a string of praise on Wright’s latest (in what has now become something of a tradition), calling it “breathtaking,” “flawlessly executed,” and “earnest and unprotected.”

Read More: Guillermo del Toro’s Guide to Creating the Perfect Movie Monster: ‘No Element Must be Accidental’

Comparing Wright to the great Walter Hill, del Toro argued that “Baby Driver” combined the action chops of “The Driver” with the fable-like qualities of “Mean Streets.” Not bad praise from the guy who made “Pan’s Labyrinth.”

“The key to understanding it fully — at least for me — is in the fact that it is a fable,
See full article at Indiewire »
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