IMDb > Mean Streets (1973)
Mean Streets
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Mean Streets (1973) More at IMDbPro »

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Mean Streets -- A small-time hood struggles to succeed on the "mean streets" of Little Italy.

Overview

User Rating:
7.5/10   57,277 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Martin Scorsese (screenplay) and
Mardik Martin (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Mean Streets on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
14 October 1973 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
You don't make up for your sins in church. You do it in the streets...
Plot:
A small-time hood struggles to succeed on the "mean streets" of Little Italy. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
5 wins & 5 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
A Scorsese original. See more (210 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Robert De Niro ... Johnny Boy

Harvey Keitel ... Charlie

David Proval ... Tony
Amy Robinson ... Teresa

Richard Romanus ... Michael

Cesare Danova ... Giovanni

Victor Argo ... Mario (in opening credits) (as Vic Argo)
George Memmoli ... Joey
Lenny Scaletta ... Jimmy
Jeannie Bell ... Diane
Murray Moston ... Oscar (as Murray Mosten)

David Carradine ... Drunk

Robert Carradine ... Boy With Gun
Lois Walden ... Jewish Girl

Harry Northup ... Soldier
Dino Seragusa ... Old Man

D'Mitch Davis ... Cop
Peter Fain ... George
Juli Andelman ... Girl At Party (as Julie Andleman)
Robert Wilder ... Benton
Ken Sinclair ... Sammy
Jaime Alba ... Young Boy #1
Ken Konstantin ... Young Boy #2
Nicki 'Ack' Aquilino ... Man On Docks (as Nicki 'Ack' Aquilino)
B. Mitchel Reed ... Disc Jockey (as B. Mitchell Reed)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Vincent Price ... Verden Fell (archive footage) (uncredited)

Catherine Scorsese ... Woman on Landing (uncredited)

Martin Scorsese ... Jimmy Shorts (uncredited)

Directed by
Martin Scorsese 
 
Writing credits
Martin Scorsese (screenplay) and
Mardik Martin (screenplay)

Martin Scorsese (story)

Produced by
E. Lee Perry .... executive producer
Jonathan T. Taplin .... producer
 
Cinematography by
Kent L. Wakeford (director of photography) (as Kent Wakeford)
 
Film Editing by
Sidney Levin  (as Sid Levin)
 
Production Management
Paul Rapp .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Ron Satlof .... second assistant director (as Ron Satloff)
Russell Vreeland .... first assistant director
Paul J. Crossey .... dga trainee (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Bill Bates .... prop master
Doyle Hall .... assistant visual consultant
David Nichols .... visual consultant
William Sandell .... assistant art director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Walter Goss .... re-recording mixer
Charles Grenzbach .... re recording mixer (as Bud Grenzbach)
Donald F. Johnson .... sound mixer (as Don Johnson)
Kenneth Schwarz .... boom operator (as Kenny Schwarz)
John Wilkinson .... re-recording mixer (as John K. Wilkinson)
 
Special Effects by
Bill Balles .... special effects (as Bill Bales)
 
Stunts
Bill Catching .... stunt coordinator (as Bill Katching)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Norman Gerard .... additional photography
John Murray .... key grip
Pat O'Mara .... assistant cameraman
Bobby Petzoldt .... gaffer
Gene A. Talvin .... camera operator (as Gene Talvin)
Bill Young .... best boy
Harry Young .... second assistant cameraman
Alec Hirschfeld .... additional photographer (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Norman Salling .... wardrobe
 
Editorial Department
George Trirogoff .... assistant editor
 
Other crew
Joe Cupcake .... assistant to producer
Peter Fain .... production coordinator
Cornelia McNamara .... clothing consultant
David Osterhout .... production coordinator: second unit
Neil Rapp .... assistant to producer
Bobbie Sierks .... script supervisor (as Bobby Sierks)
Chris Thompson .... production secretary
George Toth .... animal trainer
Sandra Weintraub .... pre-production and post-production coordinator
Pamela Williams .... assistant to producer
Dale Bell .... production crew: New York City (uncredited)
Mitchell Block .... production crew: New York City (uncredited)
 
Thanks
Paul Almond .... special thanks
Frank Aquilino .... special thanks (as Frankie Aquilino)
Nicki 'Ack' Aquilino .... special thanks
Frankie Bananas .... special thanks
Dale Bell .... special thanks
Mitchell Block .... special thanks
Dean Bojorquez .... special thanks
Larry the Box .... special thanks (as Larry The Box)
Hooter Brown .... special thanks
Jay Cocks .... special thanks
Brian De Palma .... special thanks
Norman Garey .... special thanks
Jenny Goldberg .... special thanks
Alec Hirschfeld .... special thanks
Robert Kahn .... special thanks (as Dr. Robert Kahn)
Richard Katz .... special thanks
John Krauss .... special thanks
Angelo Lamonea .... special thanks
James McCalmont .... special thanks (as Jim McCalmont)
Bill Minkin .... special thanks
Michael Mislove .... special thanks
Nancy Nigrosh .... special thanks
Lee Osborne .... special thanks
Sally Red .... special thanks
Bill Saluga .... special thanks (as Billy Saluga)
William Sandell .... special thanks (as Bill Sandell)
Catherine Scorsese .... special thanks
Brad Shattuck .... special thanks
George Smith .... special thanks
Edward Stable .... special thanks
Dita Sullivan .... special thanks
Brian Swain .... special thanks
Harry J. Ufland .... special thanks (as Harry Ufland)
Anna Uricola .... special thanks
Dominic Vaccaro .... special thanks
Fred Vaccaro .... special thanks
Roger Vreeland .... special thanks
Barbara Weintraub .... special thanks
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
112 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor) (uncredited)
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:18 | Australia:M | Australia:MA (Cable TV rating) | Australia:R (video rating) | Brazil:16 | Canada:R (DVD rating) | Canada:18A (video rating) | Finland:K-16 | France:-16 (original rating) | France:-12 (re-rating) | Hong Kong:III | Iceland:16 | Ireland:18 | Italy:VM14 | New Zealand:R18 | Norway:16 (1977) | Singapore:NC-16 | South Korea:18 | Spain:18 | Sweden:15 | UK:X (original rating) | UK:18 (tv rating) | UK:18 (video rating: DVD audio commentary) (2005) | UK:18 (re-rating) (1993) | UK:18 (video rating) (1992) (1993) (2005) | USA:R (MPAA rating: certificate #23765) | West Germany:16

Did You Know?

Trivia:
For the soundtrack music Martin Scorsese sourced much of his own personal record collectionSee more »
Goofs:
Continuity: The end credits on the DVD incorrectly list David Carradine as "Oscar" and Robert Carradine as "Drunk".See more »
Quotes:
Johnny Boy:What's the matter, you too good for this ten dollars? Huh? You too good for it? It's a good ten dollars. Know somethin' Mikey? You make me laugh. You know that?See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Grand Theft Auto 3 (2001) (VG)See more »
Soundtrack:
SCAPRICCIATIELLOSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
72 out of 96 people found the following review useful.
A Scorsese original., 15 February 2005
Author: Michael DeZubiria (wppispam2013@gmail.com) from Luoyang, China

One of the things that I love the most about watching the old classics is when you can so clearly see the beginnings of what later became such trademarks of a director, actor, even a genre. Martin Scorsese begins a long line of films about the gangs of New York with Mean Streets, a gritty look at the underside of New York City that foreshadowed much of the same stark realism portrayed in Taxi Driver a few years later. It reminds me of the minimalist realism of films like Spike Lee's Do The Right Thing, another urban classic.

Robert DeNiro plays Johnny Boy, the fast talking kid who owes money all over town and never seems to care to pay anyone back. We meet other characters who owe people money, and their apologies at not being able to pay are genuine, they realize that they're not going to get late fees added to their debt or Last Notices, they're putting their lives on the line. There is genuine fear on their side and genuine malice on the side of the people they owe money to, but Johnny Boy just doesn't seem to care.

Harvey Keitel plays Charlie Cappa, who is constantly trying to get Johnny Boy to shape up and pay off what he owes, knowing the danger that he is in and frustrated at Johnny's lack of interest or care in the fact that he owes so many people so much money. Johnny and Charlie live in the same environment but completely different worlds. Johnny holds himself in and laughs everything off, occasionally venting his frustration in quick bursts of violence, Charlie is much more contained but is tormented spiritually. While Johnny gets himself into endless debt with people that collect by any means necessary, Charlie goes to confession and holds his fingers over flames to remind himself of the dangers of the afterlife should he mess up in this one. Catholicism is a major character in this film.

The movie is set in New York City in the late 1960s, where Scorsese grew up in presumably something of a similar environment. Something must have gone differently, since he ended up one of the most famous directors in the world rather than dead like so many characters in his movies do, but he creates this environment in Mean Streets that gives an incredible view into the dangers of the life that so many people lived and continue to live there. I've never even been to New York, but having seen so many of Scorsese's films I think I can understand why the environment could have had such an impact on him that it dominated most of his career as a filmmaker.

There are some classic scenes in this movie that would have been much more widely quoted were it not for the even more quotable lines from Taxi Driver. Mean Streets, for example, is where you find the classic speech by Robert DeNiro, I'll call it the "I borrow money from everybody so I owe everybody money so I can't borrow money no more so I borrow money from you because you're the only jerkoff around here that I can borrow money without paying back!" speech. I love that one, especially the expression on his face, he's having such a great time.

But considering the world that he lives in, it's almost understandable the way he cares so little about placing himself in danger. In a life as bleak and unpromising as the one that is portrayed in this movie, it is to be expected that someone will display passive suicidal behavior. Johnny knows he's never going to go to college, he's never going to be a doctor or a businessman or drive a nice car, he's going to grow up working menial jobs and live an obscure and meaningless life, in his eyes, and that's what the movie's about.

Charlie seems to have similar feelings, looking to the Catholic Church not only as a means of salvation and spiritual fulfillment but for meaning as well. Granted, that is a very common goal for people getting involved with religion of any kind, but even more in Charlie's case. He is certainly the level-headed one between him and Johnny, but his future is not a whole lot brighter. Regardless of how much more responsible Charlie is than Johnny or how hard he tries to get Johnny to straighten out and pay off his debts, they both live in the same world, and so do their debtors. It is a world that is described in the lyrics of one of the songs in the movie –

"Have you ever had a wish sandwich? It's the kind where you take two pieces of bread and wish you had some meat."

Was the above review useful to you?
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