The Long Goodbye
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2006

12 items from 2015


Review: Robert Altman's "The Long Goodbye" (1973) Starring Elliot Gould; Blu-ray Release From Kino Lorber

26 February 2015 8:46 PM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Rip Van Marlowe

By Raymond Benson

Robert Altman was a very quirky director, sometimes missing the mark, but oftentimes brilliant. His 1973 take on Raymond Chandler’s 1953 novel The Long Goodbye is a case in point. It might take a second viewing to appreciate what’s really going on in the film. Updating what is essentially a 1940s film noir character to the swinging 70s was a risky and challenging prospect—and Altman and his star, Elliott Gould as Philip Marlowe (!), pull it off.

It’s one of those pictures that critics hated when it was first released; and yet, by the end of the year, it was being named on several Top Ten lists. I admit that when I first saw it in 1973, I didn’t much care for it. I still wasn’t totally in tune with the kinds of movies Altman made—even after M*A*S*H, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Glasgow 2015: 'Altman' review

22 February 2015 3:51 AM, PST | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★☆☆ With 39 features to his name, each as unique and innovative as the next, there are few American directors who come close to matching the prolific career of Robert Altman. Ron Mann would go one step further, describing Altman's films as distinctively "Altmanesque", a term he spends 95 minutes attempting to define in his latest documentary, Altman (2014). An affectionate exploration of Altman's life, Mann invites a wealth of this maverick filmmaker's best known collaborators and contemporaries to discuss his legacy, including the late Robin Williams, The Long Goodbye star Elliot Gould and Inherent Vice (2014) director Paul Thomas Anderson - who simply describes Altman with one word: "inspiration".

»

- CineVue UK

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'Bosch' star Titus Welliver: 'Maybe I'm just a cop without a badge'

13 February 2015 6:00 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Titus Welliver isn't the first actor I might have thought of to play Lapd homicide cop Hieronymus "Harry" Bosch, hero of 17 best-selling mystery novels and counting by Michael Connelly (plus multiple appearances in Connelly's "Lincoln Lawyer" series). But that's more because the book series started so long ago, and has allowed Harry to age in real time, so my mental image of him is much older than the "Deadwood" alum. In "Bosch," a new TV series whose first season can be streamed on Amazon Prime starting today, Welliver plays a younger and slightly mellower version of Harry. Connelly and producer Eric Overmyer ("The Wire," "Tremé") adapted the first season from pieces of three different Bosch novels ("The Concrete Blonde," "City of Bones" and "Echo Park"), and tweaks some biographical details. (Over the course of the early books, for instance, Bosch got married, divorced, and had a daughter who's on the »

- Alan Sepinwall

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Movie Review – Inherent Vice (2014)

4 February 2015 10:10 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Inherent Vice, 2014.

Directed by Paul Thomas Anderson

Starring Joaquin Phoenix, Josh Brolin, Katherine Waterston, Owen Wilson, Benicio Del Toro, Eric Roberts, Reese Witherspoon, Michael Kenneth Williams, Jena Malone, and Martin Short.

Synopsis:

In 1970, drug-fueled Los Angeles detective Larry “Doc” Sportello investigates the disappearance of a former girlfriend.

Reviewer’s note: I have no interest in describing the plot of Inherent Vice in this review. If you want to know what it’s about, there are many places to get that information online.

Expectations are a baggage which, despite best efforts, you sometimes cannot help but bring to a first viewing, especially if that first viewing is for the latest film from Paul Thomas Anderson. He’s a director who has produced films of startling magnitude time after time, and as I sat down to watch this, his seventh film, I was guilty of having it all planned out in my »

- Gary Collinson

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The Tonight Show Returns to L.A. with a Fresh Prince Parody (Video)

3 February 2015 4:45 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Jimmy Fallon loves creating viral hits on The Tonight Show. The Internet loves The Fresh Prince. So it was inevitable that the two would come together, and lo and behold, it happened Monday night. Fallon, 40, has brought Tonight back to L.A. for a weeklong stint - one of his first moves upon taking over was to bring the show back to New York after five or so decades on the West Coast. So what better way than to commemorate this move than with an homage/parody of The Fresh Prince of Bel Air, the story of an East Coaster transplanted to California? »

- Alex Heigl, @alex_heigl

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Sundance Film Review: ‘Digging for Fire’

27 January 2015 10:38 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Joe Swanberg continues his march toward the mainstream even as he deepens his signature brand of hangout film in “Digging for Fire,” a lovely slice of everything and nothing centered on a housesitting couple who discover possible evidence of a murder. There are feints toward a bona fide mystery plot, but that genre element is just a pretext for a stealth marital drama. The film is held together through strong improv, tight editing (by Swanberg himself), moody cinematography and a synth score (from Dan Romer) that parties like it’s 1991. This is Swanberg’s starriest picture to date — even if some appearances, like Jenny Slate’s, amount to glorified walk-ons — making breakout success eminently possible.

Concerning the adventures of married parents Tim (co-screenwriter Jake Johnson) and Lee (Rosemarie DeWitt), “Digging for Fire” opens with the two of them and their son, Jude (played by Swanberg’s toddler, Jude, the finest »

- Ben Kenigsberg

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Review: Ben Mendelsohn bets on Ryan Reynolds in shaggy 'Mississippi Grind'

27 January 2015 2:30 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Park City - It feel like Altman is in the air these days. There was, after all, a giant coffee table book about him that ended up under the trees of many a film nerd this Christmas, and little by little, his films are making their way onto Blu-ray, and Netflix just recently added a documentary that is a look back at his remarkable career. This fall also saw the release of "Inherent Vice," and while that is an adaptation of a Thomas Pynchon novel and very much a Paul Thomas Anderson film, there are more than a few echoes of Altman's "The Long Goodbye" in there. Now we've got the latest film from Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck, who have had an uneven career as filmmakers so far. They co-wrote "Half Nelson" together, and then started co-directing as well. I sort of like "Sugar," their first film as co-directors, »

- Drew McWeeny

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Inherent Vice: more marijuana misfire than stoner classic

25 January 2015 10:00 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Critics are comparing Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice to the stoner noir of The Big Lebowski – but, even with Joaquin Phoenix in The Dude role, it’s not in the same league

Three viewings in and I’m still not at all sure how I feel about Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice. But this has been true for me of all his recent movies. I thought the first half of There Will Be Blood was masterly film-making, and the second half was bogus, meandering, poorly workshopped tripe that couldn’t find the way to its own exit. I think The Master is a cold, self-effacing masterpiece, but it took me more than 10 viewings to come around to that opinion.

With Vice, I find most of the comparisons that critics are making unhelpful. The Big Lebowski and The Long Goodbye, the two foremost stoner-noirs, seem to have been more »

- John Patterson

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‘Inherent Vice’ a narcotic vision that demands multiple viewings

12 January 2015 6:11 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Inherent Vice

Written for the screen and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson

USA, 2014

Even if you were not around during the 1970s, Inherent Vice comes across as a faded, nostalgic memory. Being a faithful adaptation of Thomas Pynchon’s novel, the film recounts the dying days of the free love era, laced with the look, feel and paraphernalia of the subculture. Anderson’s comedic thriller peppers itself with restless, almost out of place laughter, while dedicating itself to the themes of the early Seventies. One is reminded of private-eye classics such as Roman Polanski’s Chinatown and Robert Altman’s The Long Goodbye, with traces of Zucker-Abrahams comedies like Airplane! and The Naked Gun. For many, the homage to 1970s filmmaking will be a very real and thrilling look down memory lane. For others, it’ll be a history lesson like no other found in modern day filmmaking.

Larry ‘Doc »

- Christopher Clemente

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Inherent Vice: more marijuana misfire than stoner classic

12 January 2015 2:31 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Critics are comparing Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice to the stoner noir of The Big Lebowski – but, even with Joaquin Phoenix in The Dude role, it’s not in the same league

Three viewings in and I’m still not at all sure how I feel about Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice. But this has been true for me of all his recent movies. I thought the first half of There Will Be Blood was masterly film-making, and the second half was bogus, meandering, poorly workshopped tripe that couldn’t find the way to its own exit. I think The Master is a cold, self-effacing masterpiece, but it took me more than 10 viewings to come around to that opinion.

With Vice, I find most of the comparisons that critics are making unhelpful. The Big Lebowski and The Long Goodbye, the two foremost stoner-noirs, seem to have been more »

- John Patterson

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Inherent Vice Is Groovy, Funny, and Strange

9 January 2015 6:10 AM, PST | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

After two viewings, I still don’t know what Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice adds up to, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing: Why should a movie add up to anything? It’s not a theorem. Interstellar adds up to something, and it’s unintentionally hilarious. Inherent Vice, which is set in 1970 in a beach town south of L.A., is like a gorgeous stoner art object, and maybe you need to get baked to be on its dissonant, erratic wavelength. It’s groovy, distant, funny — funny-strange and funny-ha-ha. It’s drugged camp. It’s like nothing else. Except maybe the novel, which is Thomas Pynchon’s contribution to the L.A. stoner private-eye genre, the highest (so to speak) achievements of which are on film: Robert Altman’s take on Raymond Chandler’s The Long Goodbye and Joel and Ethan Coen’s The Big Lebowski. What they »

- David Edelstein

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Review: “St. Ives” (1976) Starring Charles Bronson And Jacqueline Bisset; Warner Archive Streaming Service

2 January 2015 3:07 AM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Don Stradley

Charles Bronson was 55 at the time of “St Ives” (1976). He was just a couple years past his star-making turn in “Death Wish”, and was enjoying a surprising run of success. I say surprising because Bronson had, after all, been little more than a craggy second banana for most of his career. Now, inexplicably, he had box office clout as a leading man. In fact, Bronson reigned unchallenged for a few years as the most popular male actor in international markets. Yes, even bigger than Eastwood, Newman, Reynolds, Redford, or any other 1970s star you can name. Many of Bronson’s movies were partly financed by foreign investors, for even if his movies didn’t score stateside, they still drew buckets of money in Prague or Madrid. Some have suggested that his popularity on foreign screens was due to how little he said in his movies (there was »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2006

12 items from 2015


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