Live and Let Die (1973) - News Poster

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General Idi Amin Dada: A Self-Portrait

Ladies and Gentlemen, we have a precedent! Barbet Schroeder’s documentary gets up close and personal with a narcissistic dictator consumed by his own ego. Idi Amin rants and raves incoherently and demands to be the center of all attention while taking his country down a road to ruin. This is Africa in 1973, where Uganda has been converted into ‘The Idi Amin Reality Show’ — and where a minion in disfavor might be fed to the crocodiles.

General Idi Amin Dada: A Self-Portrait

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 153

1974 / Color / 1:37 flat Academy / 90 min. / Général Idi Amin Dada: Autoportrait / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date December 12, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Idi Amin

Cinematography: Néstor Almendros

Film Editor: Denise de Casabianca

Original Music: Idi Amin

Produced by Jean-Francois Chauvel, Charles-Henri Favrod and Jean-Pierre Rassam

Written and Directed by Barbet Schroeder

Criterion’s decision to bump Barbet Schroeder’s daring 1970s documentary to Blu-ray at this
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

MI6 Confidential Presents Special "Live And Let Die" Limited Edition Issue

  • CinemaRetro
Cinema Retro has received the following press release:

In 2017, after ten years of service, MI6 Confidential has introduced a new special format: a limited-run 100-page perfect bound issue of the magazine taking a deep dive into one particular facet of the franchise. This first special issue was contributed by Oscar-winning art department veteran Peter Lamont.

Peter Lamont spent more than 40 years working in art departments of the James Bond films. From draughtsman to production designer; from Goldfinger to Casino Royale, Peter worked on every picture but one. One of the films for which he has collected a great deal of documents and has many fond memories is Roger Moore's debut as 007, Live And Let Die.

A lot of that material could not be squeezed into his recent autobiography, so Peter came to MI6 Confidential with an offer too good to refuse. In this special 100-page perfect bound edition of MI6 Confidential magazine,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Strictly Come Dancing: week nine – as it happened

The dancers were in Blackpool this week – so who rocked the Tower Ballroom, and who took the first bus home?

8.01pm GMT

Jonnie and Oti take a final turn around the dancefloor to “You’ve Lost That Loving Feeling”. Bit dusty in here.

On that sad note, this year’s Blackpool Special is over! Service will resume as normal next week, with only seven dancers left fighting for the four places in the Grand Final on 16th December. Kick off is at 6.50pm, so join me then for another sparkle-filled Saturday night. Thanks for joining in, and have a great week! Hx

7.58pm GMT

All the judges vote for Debbie and Giovanni, which means Jonnie And Oti are leaving the Strictly dancefloor.

He thanks the judges for judging him as an equal, and hopes the next person with a disability who performs on Strictly can tuck their bum under better than him.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Jane Seymour Reveals Sexual Harassment As Young Actress

As allegations of sexual harassment and assault by powerful entertainment industry figures continue to balloon, Jane Seymour has recounted her own experience as a young actress in Hollywood, an incident that stopped her from working for an entire year. In an interview with Sky News’ Sunrise morning show and reported by The Daily Mail, the British actress known for her roles in Live and Let Die, Somewhere in Time and TV’s Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman recalled an incident with…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Jane Seymour Reveals Sexual Harassment As Young Actress

Jane Seymour Reveals Sexual Harassment As Young Actress
As allegations of sexual harassment and assault by powerful entertainment industry figures continue to balloon, Jane Seymour has recounted her own experience as a young actress in Hollywood, an incident that stopped her from working for an entire year. In an interview with Sky News’ Sunrise morning show and reported by The Daily Mail, the British actress known for her roles in Live and Let Die, Somewhere in Time and TV’s Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman recalled an incident with…
See full article at Deadline »

What’s Coming to Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime in November 2017

What’s Coming to Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime in November 2017
November may mean the end of Halloween, but that doesn’t mean that the creepy fun has to end as Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon continue to add some freaky films to November’s list of streaming content.

Netflix will start the month off with films like “Oculus” and “Silent Hill” for fans of big scares and “Casper” and “Scary Movie” for those who looking for a milder way to keep the Halloween spirit alive, and will also add in “9” and “Piranha” later in the month. For those who would rather leave the October spookiness behind, science fiction comedies like “Chappie” and “Men in Black” or family-friendly films like “Charlotte’s Web” and “The Boss Baby” should make for fun movie nights.

Hulu will also keep the frights coming with offerings like “Bram Stoker’s Dracula” and “Beowulf,” but will also get a headstart on the winter holiday season with “Christmas with the Cranks,” Happy Christmas,” and collection
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Drive-In Dust Offs: The Fly (1958)

“Charming” is not often a word associated with horror films; it’s counterintuitive to what the genre usually stands for—you know, terror and tension, followed by release and a sense of ease, then repeat—but yet here we are with a romantic tale about a boy, a girl, a teleportation device, and the insect that comes between them. Welcome to the world of The Fly (1958), where the hosts are welcoming, the police polite, and the monster bug-eyed.

Released by Twentieth Century Fox in July, The Fly pulled in $7 million against its $300,000 budget, enticing audiences with a tale often told at the time—sold as another Atomic Age Monster Mash, The Fly instead uses a much smaller (and human) canvas to convey a message of obsession and the love that ultimately ends it. Having said that, you also get a man with a fly head and some neat-o transportation sequences,
See full article at DailyDead »

London Film Convention: Cinema Retro's Mark Mawston Reports

  • CinemaRetro
"Thunderball" co-stars Martine Beswick and Luciana Paluzzi.

Hammer and "Live and Let Die" actress Madeleine Smith.

By Mark Mawston

The London Film Convention, organized by Thomas Bowington was quite literally a Who’s Who of heroes and villains from the small and silver screen. The actual Who came in the shape of a Dr. himself in the guise of Sylvester McCoy, along with Who assistants Katy Manning who played Jo and Bernard Cribbins from both the Amicus film version and the TV version. There was also a rare appearance from Garial Woolf. The other key cult British film genres-the Carry On films, James Bond and Hammer horror- were all represented too, with many of the star guests appearing in all three: from the Carry On Films we had Fenella Fielding, Anita Harris and Amanda Barrie, from Hammer and Bond we had Maddie Smith, Valerie Leon, Martine Beswick, Eunice Gayson, John Wyman,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Krakatoa East of Java

‘Things Blowing Up Good’ has been surefire entertainment since the beginning of cinema, but this ill-fated Cinerama extravaganza about the biggest explosion in recorded human history limps along despite some pretty darned impressive volcanic effects. It’s quite an entertaining spectacle, with various good performers in three soap opera plots, either overacting or loitering about with nothing to do. And don’t forget the from-left-field musical striptease.

Krakatoa East of Java

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1969 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 131 min. / Street Date September 12, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Maximilian Schell, Diane Baker, Brian Keith, Barbara Werle, Sal Mineo, Rossano Brazzi, John Leyton, J.D. Cannon, Jacqueline (Jacqui) Chan, Victoria Young, Marc Lawrence, Geoffrey Holder, Niall MacGinnis, Sumi Haru.

Cinematography: Manuel Berenguer

Film Editors: Walter Hannemann, Warren Low, Maurice Rootes

Production Design: Eugèné Lourié

Costumes: Laure Lourié

Special Effects: Eugèné Lourié, Alex Weldon, Francisco Prósper

Original Music: Frank De Vol

Written by Clifford Newton Gould,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Top Ten Movie Franchises Based on Books

  • Cinelinx
For as long as there have been movies, there have been movies based on books. This is a look at the best movie franchises that are either based on a book or several books.

It’s one thing to have a movie that is based on a book. It happens all the time. It’s more rare to have an entire franchise of films based on a book or set of books. Over the last two decades, it seems like we have been seeing more and more franchises emerge that are based on books. This seems to be happening for a few reasons. First, Hollywood is more than ever looking for established properties on which to base films. Book, have been and always will be one of the best established properties for a movie to be based upon. Second, if the books have a big following, chances are that the
See full article at Cinelinx »

Bond boxset sued for not having enough Bond movies in it

Simon Brew Aug 7, 2017

The definitive James Bond DVD and Blu-ray boxset wasn't definitive at all, it seems...

Here’s a bit of an odd story for you. Back in September 2012, a boxset of James Bond movies was released, that claimed to gather “all the Bond films” in one set for the first time. As such, lots of people bought said set, including a customer by the name of Mary Johnson.

See related Broadchurch series 3: Jodie Whittaker interview Doctor Who, and the casting of Jodie Whittaker Bodies: excellent medical drama not for the faint-hearted

Thing is, Mary Johnson wasn’t best pleased to note that two 007 adventures were missing from the set. The original, comedy-driven take on Casino Royale, and the unofficial remake of Thunderball, Never Say Never Again.

Given that the box copy was boastful about the set containing every Bond film adventure – we assume that Stormbreaker doesn’t count,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Roger Moore’s James Bond: appreciating the raised eyebrow

Tim George Jul 10, 2017

An appreciation of the late Roger Moore, and his importance to the James Bond series...

It took me a long time to realise this but the more I think about it, the more it makes sense: Roger Moore is the most important actor to play James Bond. For while Sean Connery created the icon, Roger Moore is the reason why we are still trotting out to the cinema. This premise might sound like sacrilege.

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As I’ve gotten older, and four movies into Daniel Craig’s tenure, my thinking has shifted considerably. Whereas I used to wish that the movies followed the books, I’ve finally recognised that
See full article at Den of Geek »

Review: "Bank Shot" (1974) Starring George C. Scott; Kino Lorber Blu-ray Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Few would argue that George C. Scott was one of the greatest actors of stage and screen. His presence in even a mediocre movie elevated its status considerably and his work as the nutty general in "Dr. Strangelove" was described by one critic as "the comic performance of the decade". When Scott won his well-deserved Oscar for Best Actor in "Patton" (which he famously refused), he seemed to be on a roll. His next film, the darkly satirical comedy "The Hospital" predicted the absurdities of America's for-profit health care system in which the rich and the poor were taken care of, with everyone else falling in between. The film earned Scott another Best Actor Oscar nomination despite his snubbing of the Academy the previous year. From that point, however, Scott's choice of film roles was wildly eclectic. There were some gems and plenty of misfires that leads
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Ed Catto: Live and Let Love the One You’re With

Last week, the front page of The New York Times mourned the death of Roger Moore. Shockingly, they ran a photo from Live and Let Die showing the actor, as James Bond, in bed with Jane Seymour, right there on the front page.

How fitting. But there’s a catch. While I’m a big James Bond fan, amongst 007 fans, Sean Connery is always revered at the “real” face of Bond. I get that. And if fact, when I read James Bond prose adventures I generally conjure up Connery’s face and voice as I visualize the scenes.

On the other hand… there was a 70s sentiment that admonished us all to love the one we’re with. And growing up, Roger Moore was the Bond I was with.

I clearly remember the day when my parents were debating the merits of taking my brother, Colin, and me to see a movie.
See full article at Comicmix »

Pierce Brosnan Pays Tribute to Fellow James Bond Actor Roger Moore

Pierce Brosnan Pays Tribute to Fellow James Bond Actor Roger Moore
Sir Roger Moore, the longest-serving actor to ever take on the role of James Bond, unfortunately passed away at the age of 89 last week. To say we lost a legend would be an understatement, and the world knows it. One of his fellow James Bond stars, Pierce Brosnan, has now penned a touching, heartfelt and lengthy tribute to Roger Moore, revealing how much respect he had for the actor, as well as some personal insights into their relationship.

Pierce Brosnan penned the column for Variety, in which, he describes Roger Moore as his "first real hero". Roger Moore starred in seven James Bond movies, starting with Live and Let Die and ending with A View to a Kill from the years of 1973 to 1985. In the column, Brosnan explains that, even before his role turn as 007, Roger Moore influenced him on the TV series The Saint as Simon Templar. Here's what
See full article at MovieWeb »

Film Feature: HollywoodChicago.com Remembers Roger Moore as Bond, James Bond

Chicago – “Shaken, Not Stirred.” “Bond, James Bond.” “Jaws.” All the Bond iconography was celebrated by the actor who portrayed him in the most films, and the longest time period. Sir Roger Moore brought a suave and quipping Jb to the filmgoers of the 1970s and ‘80s, so the film writers of HollywoodChicago.com – Jon Espino, Patrick McDonald and Spike Walters – bring essays in honor of their favorite Roger Moore Bond films.

Roger Moore Strikes a Familiar Pose as James Bond

Photo credit: Eon Productions

The roguish Moore portrayed Britain’s most famous spy with a air of sophistication and humor, eschewing the harder edge that the first Bond, Sean Connery, had established. From the first film, “Live and Let Die” (1972) to 13 years later with “A View to a Kill,” Moore defined Bond for a generation of 1970s and ‘80s filmgoers. Read the full HollywoodChicago.com obituary by clicking here.

Jon Espino,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Pierce Brosnan Reflects on the 'Kindness and Humanity' of Late James Bond Star Roger Moore

Pierce Brosnan Reflects on the 'Kindness and Humanity' of Late James Bond Star Roger Moore
Pierce Brosnan is paying tribute to fellow James Bond star, Roger Moore.

Following the 89-year-old actor's death last week, Brosnan penned an emotional essay for Variety, published on Tuesday, in which he opens up about Moore's impact on his own life and career, calling the star his "first real hero."

"Only on reflection do I see how much of an influence Roger Moore had on me as a young Irish immigrant lad from the banks of the River Boyne," Brosnan wrote. "I guess the combination of Bond and The Saint ignited a flame for fame in my heart of innocent wonder. I wanted to be up there. Roger as the Saint made me believe in his world. And before I knew it, the man who was the Saint transformed into James Bond, an even greater hero to me as a boy."

Watch: Roger Moore, 'James Bond' Actor, Dies at 89

Moore starred as anti-hero Simon Templar in the
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

The Hitman's Bodyguard, Spider-Man: Homecoming, Valerian, and more make our weekly movie news

The Hitman's Bodyguard, Spider-Man: Homecoming, Valerian, and more make our weekly movie newsThe Hitman's Bodyguard, Spider-Man: Homecoming, Valerian, and more make our weekly movie newsZachary Dent5/26/2017 4:46:00 Pm

A lot of new trailers, clips, and exciting news in general dropped this week! We've got it all coming at you to start the weekend off right.

We got some sad news this week, Sir Roger Moore passed away. Before we dive into our usual roundup of movie news we must acknowledge Roger Moore's illustrious career in Hollywood. He played the iconic character of James Bond 7 times between 1973 and 1985 (Live and Let Die, The Spy who Loved Me, and Moonraker being the most notable). He was the title character in the successful TV series The Saint. Many may also know him from the comedy The Cannonball Run. His career lasted decades but came to an end today when he passed away.
See full article at Cineplex »

David Bowers interview: Wimpy Kid, James Bond, family movies

Simon Brew May 25, 2017

The director of the new Wimpy Kid - and the last three - on the movie, and why he doesn't like deleted scenes...

Returning for the fourth Diary Of A Wimpy Kid film – and his third as director – is British-born director David Bowers. Having started with animation – directing Flushed Away and Astro Boy, amongst his extensive credits – Bowers has since been primarily working on bringing Jeff Kinney’s characters to the screen.

Ahead of the release in UK cinemas this Friday of Diary Of A Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul, he spared us some time for a chat about the movie.

We started by my asking if he’d been to see the film himself since it was finished…

I went on Saturday to watch it. My mother in law wanted to see it. The guy in front of us, who’d grudgingly taken his seven-year old daughter,
See full article at Den of Geek »

How Roger Moore Made the Role of James Bond His Own

How Roger Moore Made the Role of James Bond His Own
Few actors have come across quite so invincible onscreen as Roger Moore, the James Bond star who dodged death by sharks (“Live and Let Die”), yo-yo buzzsaw (“Octopussy”), space lasers (“Moonraker”) and a demented Christopher Walken (“A View to a Kill”), barely so much as creasing his tuxedo in the process.

Moore played 007 in seven movies over the course of a dozen years, dodging more bullets — golden and otherwise — than we could possibly count. But sooner or later, fate was sure to catch up with the debonair star. All men are mortal, of course, but not so Bond, who’s been saving the world since 1962 (“Dr. No”), and with his passing, Moore became the first big-screen Bond to leave us.

He was actually the third star to play the part, taking over the role from Sean Connery in 1973, and unlike Australian model George Lazenby (who played 007 just once, in “On
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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