The Legend of Hell House
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5 items from 2016


Class of 1986: Six Horror & Sci-Fi Movies Released in 1986 That Deserve More Love

10 July 2016 3:27 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

When it comes to horror and sci-fi movies from 1986, there are several milestone titles that always come to mind first: Aliens, The Fly, Blue Velvet, Friday the 13th Part VI: Jason Lives, Manhunter, Poltergeist II: The Other Side, or even Psycho III, just to name a few. But like any great year of cinema, there are always a few underrated gems that get overshadowed along the way and should receive a little extra love. Here are six films from 1986 that I think deserve to be on every genre fan’s radar:

F/X: A movie about a special effects artist who gets mixed up in a government conspiracy, at a time when practical effects were in their heyday? Yes, please. F/X isn’t a film I hear a ton of folks talk about, but it has been on cable a lot lately, which means I’ve spent a few nights revisiting it, »

- Heather Wixson

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Drive-In Dust Offs: The Food Of The Gods (1976)

18 June 2016 11:17 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Sometimes in horror, a giant creature will do. It takes us back to a simpler time, I think. A time when an oversized spider, or a massive lizard sparked shuttered eyes at the Drive-In or local theatre. It feels almost like a cleansing; a reset of the scare-o-meter back to the innocent levels of the Saturday matinee. And if you were a kid in the ‘70s, Bert I. Gordon’s The Food of the Gods (1976) fit the bill nicely.

Released in June by Aip stateside, and then rolled out across the world in ’77, Food brought in $1 million at the gate (good revenue by Aip standards) and the reviews were, not surprisingly, as low grade as the budget. But hey, legendary schlockmeister Gordon did not survive the biz on good copy. And what kind of reviews would you expect from a movie that features giant chickens, gargantuan rats, and Marjoe Gortner? »

- Scott Drebit

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Interview: Director Paul Hough on Steampunk Musical The Invitation To Armageddon

13 May 2016 5:02 PM, PDT | shocktillyoudrop.com | See recent shocktillyoudrop news »

Shock talks to director Paul Hough about his horror/fantasy music The Invitation To Armageddon. Writer/Director Paul Hough (The Human Race, son of The Legend Of Hell House director John Hough) recently released his latest effort, a maniacal short film starring the members of Steampunk collective “The League of S.T.E.A.M.” called The Invitation To Armageddon, a go-for-broke…

The post Interview: Director Paul Hough on Steampunk Musical The Invitation To Armageddon appeared first on Shock Till You Drop. »

- Chris Alexander

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Drive-In Dust Offs: It! (1967)

7 May 2016 9:32 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

As a horror fan, sometimes you just want to wade in the waters of the absurd and inane. To bath in the bathetic, and wash in the ridiculous. If you’re up for a swim, throw on your trunks and join me for Herbert J. Leder’s It! (1967), a modern retelling of the Golem legend dry humped by Psycho. And if that description piques your interest, take the plunge with me, won’t you?

Produced by Seven Arts Pictures and distributed by Warner Brothers/Seven Arts, It! was released in the UK (where it was filmed) in July of ’67 followed by the U.S. in November. Frequently paired with Leder’s previous film, The Frozen Dead (’66), the U.S. print of It! was in black and white, as opposed to the glorious Eastmancolour on display and as intended. The film was also known as Anger of the Golem, and Curse of the Golem, »

- Scott Drebit

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Drive-In Dust Offs: The Evil (1978)

20 February 2016 11:55 AM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

A haunted house film is a tough sell. No masked stalker, no creatures that eviscerate and certainly no zombies lurching down those shadowed halls. A single setting, a dark secret, a group of people terrified by something is usually your standard template, and even the best haunted house flick doth not stray from the formula. So the trick is to convince the viewers once you get them inside – something that the low on budget, high on conviction, and seldom talked about The Evil (1978) accomplishes admirably.

Barely distributed in May of ‘78 by Roger Corman’s New World Pictures, The Evil was made for $700,000 Us and came and went very quickly. The filmmakers complained about the paltry distribution, but I’m sure Corman turned a profit somewhere down the line – he usually did. So from the modest budget, to the generic sounding title (why not just call it Horror Movie?) to the not exactly topical sub genre, »

- Scott Drebit

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

5 items from 2016


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