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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2003

1-20 of 73 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


10 Oscar Underdogs Who Stand the Best Chance at Gold

16 October 2017 4:19 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Ten months into the year, it’s hard out here for an Oscar contender. Being worthy of remembering, or being watched by Academy members, demands a warm film-festival reception, rave reviews, effective marketing and distribution, strong theater attendance, and word of mouth. Check out this curated (alphabetical) selection of long-shot performers who are worthy of Oscar consideration, but may see their movies get lost in the intense competitive awards shuffle.

1. Bryan Cranston

Category: Best Actor

Awards: Nominated for Best Actor by SAG and the Oscars for “Trumbo,” Cranston won three Best Actor in a Drama Emmys for playing Walter White in “Breaking Bad” and won SAG Best Actor in TV movie as Lbj in “All the Way.”

Last Hit: “Why Him?” ($60 million domestic)

Title: “Last Flag Flying” (Amazon Studios)

Bottom Line: This layered New York Film Festival opener stars Cranston in one of his signature large, colorful, entertaining performances as Sal, »

- Anne Thompson

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10 Oscar Underdogs Who Stand the Best Chance at Gold

16 October 2017 4:19 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Ten months into the year, it’s hard out here for an Oscar contender. Being worthy of remembering, or being watched by Academy members, demands a warm film-festival reception, rave reviews, effective marketing and distribution, strong theater attendance, and word of mouth. Check out this curated (alphabetical) selection of long-shot performers who are worthy of Oscar consideration, but may see their movies get lost in the intense competitive awards shuffle.

1. Bryan Cranston

Category: Best Actor

Awards: Nominated for Best Actor by SAG and the Oscars for “Trumbo,” Cranston won three Best Actor in a Drama Emmys for playing Walter White in “Breaking Bad” and won SAG Best Actor in TV movie as Lbj in “All the Way.”

Last Hit: “Why Him?” ($60 million domestic)

Title: “Last Flag Flying” (Amazon Studios)

Bottom Line: This layered New York Film Festival opener stars Cranston in one of his signature large, colorful, entertaining performances as Sal, »

- Anne Thompson

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61st BFI London Film Festival Review – Last Flag Flying (2017)

9 October 2017 4:50 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Last Flag Flying, 2017.

Directed by Richard Linklater.

Starring Steve Carell, Bryan Cranston, Laurence Fishburne and J. Quinton Johnson.

Synopsis:

Thirty years after they served together in Vietnam, a former Navy Corpsman Larry “Doc” Shepherd re-unites with his old buddies, former Marines Sal Nealon and Reverend Richard Mueller, to bury his son, a young Marine killed in the Iraq War.

Richard Linklater is a director who specialises in on the cusp, transitional dramas. Dazed and Confused sees a group of college kids on kick out day, the Before trilogy picks up with Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy’s characters at various crossroads points in their lives, and his masterful Boyhood is one glorious study of identity in transition as the central character grows from the age of 7 to 19 in front of our eyes. Even School of Rock culminates in the heartwarming progression from prep school snotnosers into fully fledged rock gods. »

- Sean Wilson

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Lff 2017: ‘Last Flag Flying’ Review: Dir. Richard Linklater (2017)

9 October 2017 4:32 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Last Flag Flying review: Bryan Cranston, Steve Carell and Laurence Fishburne star as three Vietnam war vets who take to the road in this warm, affecting tale from Richard Linklater.

Last Flag Flying review by Paul Heath.

Last Flag Flying review

Richard Linklater is enjoying quite the career now. Following his Oscar nominations for the brilliant 12-years-in-the-making Boyhood, his nostalgic look back at the 1970s, and indeed his indie masterpiece that is Dazed and Confused with the much-loved Everybody Wants Some!!, Linklater has now opted for something completely different – a character-driven comedy-drama based around the fall-out of war, loss and never leaving a comrade behind with Last Flag Flying.

Billed as a ‘spiritual sequel’ to Hal Ashby’s 1973 Oscar-nominated, Vietnam-set movie The Last Detail, a film which boasted the talents of Jack Nicholson, Randy Quaid and Otis Young, Last Flag Flying is set in 2003 during the invasion of Iraq. This story, »

- Paul Heath

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‘Last Flag Flying’ Helmer Richard Linklater On War Drama That “Could Unite People” — The Contenders London

6 October 2017 9:33 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Don’t believe everything you read, Richard Linklater said today at Deadline’s inaugural Contenders London event, sitting down opposite Bryan Cranston to discuss his New York Film Festival-premiering drama, Last Flag Flying. Based on Darryl Ponicsan’s novel of the same name, which is itself a sequel to his 1973 novel, The Last Detail—a piece that was adapted into a classic film starring Jack Nicholson—Linklater’s film is more of a companion piece than anything else… »

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Amazon Studios’ Best Chance to Disrupt the Oscars Again Lies With ‘The Big Sick’

3 October 2017 2:33 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Amazon Studios owns the 2017 New York Film Festival with opener “Last Flag Flying” from Richard Linklater, Todd Haynes’ “Wonderstruck” as the centerpiece gala October 7, and Woody Allen’s “Wonder Wheel” closing it out October 15 — but taking those movies into the crowded fall marketplace and landing Oscar nominations and wins is another matter altogether.

Of course, Amazon has done it before: At Sundance 2016, it paid $10 million for Kenneth Lonergan’s “Manchester By the Sea” and took the movie (via Roadside Attractions) all the way to six Oscar nominations, including Best Picture. It won two, for Best Actor Casey Affleck and Lonergan for Best Original Screenplay, and earned a robust $47.6 million domestic.

This year, the deep-pocketed studio challenger — which, unlike Netflix, supports the industry’s established theatrical paradigm, 90-day window and all — has a wider swath of films to compete in multiple awards categories. But there are several key differences this time. »

- Anne Thompson

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Amazon Studios’ Best Chance to Disrupt the Oscars Again Lies With ‘The Big Sick’

3 October 2017 2:33 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Amazon Studios owns the 2017 New York Film Festival with opener “Last Flag Flying” from Richard Linklater, Todd Haynes’ “Wonderstruck” as the centerpiece gala October 7, and Woody Allen’s “Wonder Wheel” closing it out October 15 — but taking those movies into the crowded fall marketplace and landing Oscar nominations and wins is another matter altogether.

Of course, Amazon has done it before: At Sundance 2016, it paid $10 million for Kenneth Lonergan’s “Manchester By the Sea” and took the movie (via Roadside Attractions) all the way to six Oscar nominations, including Best Picture. It won two, for Best Actor Casey Affleck and Lonergan for Best Original Screenplay, and earned a robust $47.6 million domestic.

This year, the deep-pocketed studio challenger — which, unlike Netflix, supports the industry’s established theatrical paradigm, 90-day window and all — has a wider swath of films to compete in multiple awards categories. But there are several key differences this time. »

- Anne Thompson

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‘Last Flag Flying’ Cast: Finding Humor in Tragedy & Complicated Patriotism [Nyff]

1 October 2017 9:34 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

The opening film of the fifty-fifth New York Film Festival is Richard Linklater’s “Last Flag Flying”, an emotional look at the complicated nature of modern patriotism and the unbreakable bond between service members. The film is a quasi-sequel to Hal Ashby’s 1973 classic “The Last Detail”. Similar to ‘Last Detail’, this retelling is based off a novel by Daryl Ponicsan.

Continue reading ‘Last Flag Flying’ Cast: Finding Humor in Tragedy & Complicated Patriotism [Nyff] at The Playlist. »

- Joe Blessing

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‘Last Flag Flying’: Richard Linklater Talks Sequels, More ‘Dazed’ & Disappointment With ‘Everybody Wants Some!!’

29 September 2017 1:28 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

The Last Detail,” Hal Ashby’s 1973 masterpiece about the road trip and toxic friendship which developed between three Navy sailors has aged like fine wine over the years, turning into an elegy for the country’s loss of innocence post-Vietnam. Jack Nicholson and Randy Quaid‘s incredible performances drove the narrative home with unexpectedly touching vitality, and the picture has cemented a place as one of the greats of 1970s American cinema.

Continue reading ‘Last Flag Flying’: Richard Linklater Talks Sequels, More ‘Dazed’ & Disappointment With ‘Everybody Wants Some!!’ at The Playlist. »

- Jordan Ruimy

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New York Film Fest: 'Last Flag Flying' Divides Critics From Non-Critics

29 September 2017 9:05 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

The world premiere of Richard Linklater's Last Flag Flying — a sequel, of sorts, to Hal Ashby's 1973 classic The Last Detail — opened the 55th New York Film Festival on Thursday night. The audience at Lincoln Center's Alice Tully Hall responded warmly to the dramedy, with laughter throughout and enthusiastic applause at the end. But critics who screened the film earlier in the day — including The Hollywood Reporter's David Rooney — largely slammed it. That made for interesting conversation and debate at the Tavern on the Green post-premiere party, which was filled with the Big »

- Scott Feinberg

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Last Flag Flying Review [Nyff 2017]

28 September 2017 3:22 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Richard Linklater’s Last Flag Flying opens this year’s New York Film Festival with a seriocomic drama about friendship in the midst of a topical treatment of the consequences and effects of war. With a script by Linklater and author Darryl Ponicsan, Last Flag Flying bridges the gap between Vietnam and Iraq, attempting to highlight the humor, pathos, and universality in soldiers’ experiences, in war and out of it.

The film opens in November 2003 with Larry “Doc” Shepherd (Steve Carell) visiting his Vietnam War buddy Sal Nealon (Bryan Cranston) at a dive bar that Sal runs in Norfolk, Virginia. After a night of boozy reminiscences, they take a quick trip upstate to see Reverend Richard Mueller (Laurence Fishburne), another old war buddy who’s reformed himself, gotten married, and become a pastor of a small church.

There, Doc finally explains why he sought out his old compatriots after so »

- Lauren Humphries-Brooks

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New York Film Festival Review: Richard Linklater’s ‘Last Flag Flying’

28 September 2017 12:26 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

If you took three middle-aged war veterans and turned their lives into an earnest, pious, watchable, but naggingly inauthentic TV dramedy, the result might look something like Richard Linklater’s “Last Flag Flying.” The movie was adapted from a novel by Daryl Ponicsan, who wrote the book that “The Last Detail” was based on, and it’s a kind of spiritual sequel that mirrors the abstract outline of that celebrated 1973 film: a trio of military men thrown together on a scattershot road odyssey. In this case, though, the movie is set in December 2003, and the three men are old comrades (two Marines, one Navy), all of whom served together in Vietnam.

Sal (Bryan Cranston), craggy and bearded in a black leather jacket, with a leering insult for every occasion, is the upstart of the group: an ebullient, foul-mouthed drinker who owns and runs a dive bar in Norfolk, Virginia. Burly, gray-haired »

- Owen Gleiberman

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Richard Linklater’s “Last Flag Flying” earns tears at Nyff

28 September 2017 11:57 AM, PDT | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

This morning, audiences at the 2017 New York Film Festival were the first to see Richard Linklater’s latest outing, the road trip dramedy Last Flag Flying. It’s the Opening Night Selection of the fest, officially kicking it off. Luckily for all of us in attendance, it’s also a terrific work, signaling not just another Academy Award contender, but another great film for the year. Plus, it honors the legacy of the flick that came before it (more on that in a moment). Amazon Studios continues to pick excellent bits of cinema to promote. This could very well end up just as successful as Manchester by the Sea was for them last year. The film is a sequel to The Last Detail, though familiarity with that picture is hardly required. Out of contact with each other for three decades, a trio of the Vietnam War veterans are brought back together. »

- Joey Magidson

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‘Last Flag Flying’ Review: Richard Linklater Confronts the War at Home | Nyff 2017

28 September 2017 10:11 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Despite what has been reported, Last Flag Flying is not a sequel to Hal Ashby's The Last Detail. Darryl Ponicsan, who co-wrote the screenplay with director Richard Linklater, wrote both the book that Ashby adapted and the one that Linklater adapted, both of which follow the same three military men. In Linklater's film, however, we are not re-introduced to Bill Buddusky, Mulhall, and Meadows, as portrayed by Jack Nicholson, Otis Young, and Randy Quaid. Instead, we meet Sal Nealon (Bryan Cranston), Mueller (Laurence Fishburne), and 'Doc' Shepard (Steve Carell), three retired military men who we learn … »

- Chris Cabin

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‘Last Flag Flying’ Review: Richard Linklater Takes Steve Carell, Bryan Cranston, and Laurence Fishburne to Wistful Heights

28 September 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Nobody does sequels better than Richard Linklater, as his “Before” trilogy proved over three brilliantly chatty movies. However, “Last Flag Flying” represents a fresh challenge: It’s the unofficial sequel to a 44-year-old movie, picking up the threads of a story that predates Linklater’s career by more than decade. The result is an understated drama so measured that its surface-level plot about a grief-stricken man and his old war buddies might easily be mistaken for half-baked sentimentalism. However, “Last Flag Flying” succeeds in following the aging Vietnam vets of Hal Ashby’s 1973 “The Last Detail” by sharing the same critical tone, connecting Ashby’s countercultural rage to Linklater’s introspection.

Where Robert Towne and Darryl Ponicsan adapted “The Last Detail” from Ponicsan’s 1970 novel, Linklater and Ponicsan do likewise with “Last Flag Flying,” which Ponicsan published in 2005. Without reaching the philosophically profound heights of “Boyhood” or the ruminative comedy of “Everybody Wants Some! »

- Eric Kohn

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Nyff Review: ‘Last Flag Flying’ is a Road Trip Movie That Charts a Familiar Path

28 September 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Few filmmakers capture people hanging out quite like Richard Linklater, who has so many features revolving around convivial moments that it would be easier to list the films without them. As early as the rambling chance encounters of his breakthrough, Slacker to the recent drug-and-booze-fueled amateur philosophizing in Everybody Wants Some!!, Linklater has remarkable eyes and ears for elevating digressions that many other artists would treat as trivial into invaluable character- and world-building moments without sacrificing their inherently relaxed mood. It is appropriate, then, that the best parts of Last Flag Flying, a loose sequel to Hal Ashby’s The Last Detail, are those centering on casual conversation organically unfolding between the leads, chatter that often intensifies into poignant drama or devolves into genuine hilarity, photographed in simple-yet-striking shot-reverse-shot and two-shot configurations. What’s troublesome is that Linklater relies too heavily on these setups as his primary source of connection to the main trio, »

- The Film Stage

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Playback: Bryan Cranston on ‘Last Flag Flying’ and the Loss of Civility in Politics

28 September 2017 8:27 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Welcome to “Playback,” a Variety podcast bringing you exclusive conversations with the talents behind many of today’s hottest films.

The 55th annual New York Film Festival kicks off Thursday night with the world premiere of Richard Linklater’s “Last Flag Flying.” Based on the Darryl Ponicsan novel, a sequel to the author’s own 1970 book “The Last Detail” (though the new film is not, actually, a sequel to the 1973 Jack Nicholson film), it tells the story of three Vietnam vets who reconvene decades later under somber circumstances. Bryan Cranston stars alongside Steve Carell and Laurence Fishburne as Sal Nealon, a Norfolk bar owner who’s high on life and desperate to drag anyone else along for the ride.

Even though Cranston isn’t actually playing Billy “Badass” Buddusky, a character that helped make Nicholson a household name, he is playing him of a fashion. Nevertheless, he was not tempted to go back and look at the »

- Kristopher Tapley

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New York Film Festival: 13 Films We Can’t Wait to See This Year, From ‘Lady Bird’ to ‘Last Flag Flying’

27 September 2017 12:20 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The New York Film Festival kicks off later this week, sending us straight into the second half of a very busy fall festival season. In preparation for the festival, we’ve pinpointed its most exciting offerings, from never-before-seen narratives to insightful new documentaries, and plenty of previously-screened features looking to capitalize on strong word of mouth coming out of fellow tests like Venice, Telluride, and Toronto. In short, there’s plenty to experience in the coming weeks, so consider this your roadmap to the best of the fest.

Read More:Bryan Cranston Enters Oscar Race with New York Film Festival Opener ‘Last Flag Flying

Ahead, 13 essential titles — from buzzy world premieres to highlights from the 2017 circuit— that we can’t wait to see at this year’s New York Film Festival.

Arthur Miller: Writer

Documentaries about family members are always a dubious proposition. Some can also come across as overindulgent exercises, »

- Kate Erbland, Eric Kohn, Anne Thompson, David Ehrlich, Chris O'Falt, Jude Dry, Michael Nordine and Steve Greene

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Steve Carell’s Range Gets a Showcase With ‘Battle of the Sexes,’ ‘Last Flag Flying’

25 September 2017 4:15 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The film awards season is barely a few weeks old and it already has a candidate for Mvp: “Battle of the Sexes” and “Last Flag Flying” star Steve Carell.

When Carell first saddled up to prestige projects 11 years ago in Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris’ “Little Miss Sunshine,” you could swim in the number of stories noting the comedian’s shift into “serious” territory. It was pretty much what you’d expect for someone who had gone from sketch comedy and stealing scenes from Jim Carrey in “Bruce Almighty,” to dominating air waves with a broadcast sitcom and fronting a major Judd Apatow release, to headlining a high-profile Sundance selection.

A double-dip for indie cred followed soon after with Peter Hedges’ “Dan in Real Life,” but Carell maintained an unpredictable profile. There were humble dramedies (“Crazy Stupid Love,” “The Way Way Back”) mixed in with glossy studio comedies (“Get Smart,” “The Incredible Burt Wonderstone »

- Kristopher Tapley

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"Last Flag Flying"

14 September 2017 5:57 AM, PDT | SneakPeek | See recent SneakPeek news »

Sneak Peek director Richard Linklater's upcoming drama "Last Flag Flying", based on the novel by author Darryl Ponicsan, starring Bryan Cranston, Steve Carell, Laurence Fishburne and J. Quinton Johnson, as the sequel to director Hal Ashby's 1973 feature "The Last Detail":

"...three men who once served in the same Us Marine unit together reunite to go to a funeral, when one man's son is killed in combat..."

Cast also includes Richard Robichaux, Lee Harrington, Kate Easton, Deanna Reed-Foster, Yul Vazquez, Graham Wolfe and Ted Watts Jr.

In "The Last Detail":

"...'Signalman First Class Billy Buddusky' (Jack Nicholson) and 'Gunner's Mate First Class Richard Mulhall' (Otis Young) are awaiting orders in Norfolk, Virginia when they are assigned a shore patrol detail escorting a young sailor, 'Seaman Larry Meadows' (Randy Quaid), to 'Portsmouth Naval Prison' near Kittery, Maine.

"Meadows has drawn an eight-year sentence for the petty crime of »

- Michael Stevens

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2003

1-20 of 73 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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