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1-20 of 65 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


‘The Exorcist’: Jason Ensler Joins Fox Drama Series As Executive Producer

21 hours ago | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Jason Ensler is joining Fox’s horror drama The Exorcist as an executive producer/director for its upcoming second season. In addition to his duties on the show, stemming from him directing two episodes of The Exorcist‘s first season, he also has signed a deal with the studio behind it, 20th Century Fox TV. The Exorcist, based on William Peter Blatty's bestseller and the classic 1973 movie, scored an Season 2 renewal after a modestly rated but steady freshman run, which… »

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Fox Will Summon The Exorcist Back Onto The Small Screen This September

23 June 2017 6:33 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Though The Gifted may be the highest-profile series premiere lining Fox’s fall 2017-2018 slate – Bryan Singer and Matt Nix’s X-Men family drama has been booked in for early October – the network still has plenty of fan-favorite shows returning for another crack of the whip. Case in point: The Exorcist.

Whereas a small number of movie-to-tv adaptations bombed spectacularly back in 2016 – namely Minority Report and the recently-canned 24: Legacy – Fox’s horror anthology series struck a chord with audiences and even managed to maintain a relatively healthy threshold of two million viewers per episode. Even after all these years, it turns out there’s still an appetite for William Friedkin’s film classic of ’73.

And so, to strike while the iron was hot, Fox quickly ordered a second season of The Exorcist, which is now expected to loom over the small screen on Friday, September 29th. As previously reported, the Rance family won’t be returning, meaning that Geena Davis, Hannah Kasulka, Brianne Howey, and Alan Ruck have parted ways with the series – for now, at least.

Gone but not forgotten? According to series creator Jeremy Slater, there’s still a small chance that the Rances will make an appearance somewhere down the line.

“A potential season two would find Marcus, Tomas and Bennett tasked with helping a new family or a new case of possession,” he shared with us ahead of the renewal.

“Our challenge now is to create a new family that you care about just as much as the Rances, and to find ways to make their story feel just as compelling and unique as what came before. That doesn’t mean we’ll never see any of the Rances again.

Ready for another season of supernatural thrills and spills? The Exorcist anthology series returns via Fox on Friday, September 29th, at 9:00-10:00 pm Et/Pt. The Gifted, on the other hand, begins its mutant family saga on Monday, October 2nd. »

- Michael Briers

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June 1977: When New Hollywood Got Weird

21 June 2017 9:52 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Last month, coverage of the 40th anniversary of Star Wars was understandably extensive, with pop-culture publications, daily newspapers, and TV media commemorating a film that by all rights changed the landscape of Hollywood, for better or worse. Conversely, there will likely be relatively little retrospective celebration for William Friedkin’s Sorcerer or Martin Scorsese’s New York, New York, two terrific films released roughly one month later in the week of June 19-25. Though they weren’t the first examples of New Hollywood directors following huge successes with more difficult works that flopped (Peter Bogdanovich’s secretly lovely At Long Last Love comes to mind), they stood in 1977 as back-to-back examples of talented filmmakers – one Oscar-winning, the other well on his way to becoming the most-acclaimed director of his generation – overreaching and failing after becoming a bit too full of themselves.

That is, of course, an oversimplification, just as the other charge popularized by the likes of Peter Biskind – i.e. George Lucas’ grand space opera and Steven Spielberg’s personal blockbusters killed Hollywood’s interest in movies for adults – is an oversimplification. In all truth, it isn’t surprising that audiences didn’t go for Sorcerer or New York, New York, two especially challenging-for-the-mainstream features that pushed their creators’ aesthetics to greater extremes than before while tracking in subject matter that was pessimistic even for the time. But while both films and their troubled productions saw directors burned by their ambition, they are also exceptional works showcasing how exhilarating it can be when all commercial sense goes out the window.

Friedkin’s Sorcerer can lay more claim to having been actively harmed by the arrival of Lucas’ megahit, arriving exactly one month later, on June 25, and competing for a thrill-seeking crowd. (One theater reportedly pulled Star Wars for Sorcerer for a week, only to replace it when Friedkin’s film failed to lure an audience.) The film, a remake of Henri-Georges Clouzot’s 1953 masterpiece The Wages of Fear, was also hurt by its confusing title — named after one of the trucks transporting dynamite through a dangerous jungle to put out an oil fire — and a budget that ballooned from an initially planned $15 million to $22 million following a difficult production.

Friedkin, hot off the Oscar-winning The French Connection and hugely successful The Exorcist, already had a reputation for his temperament and arrogance. They were in full force on Sorcerer: he clashed with cinematographer Dick Bush, who left halfway through filming, as well as producer David Salven, whom Friedkin fired after fights over the expensive location shoots. Friedkin extensively clashed with Paramount brass, sometimes reasonably (kicking executives off set after perceived interference), sometimes amusingly but questionably (the evil oil execs pictured in the film are actually Gulf & Western’s executive board, and they repaid him by not promoting the film). The jungle shoot itself was hell, with about 50 people quitting following injury or illness while Friedkin himself contracted malaria and lost 50 pounds.

But it’s only appropriate that the making of Sorcerer was so desperate, given the story it tells. Friedkin’s worldview has always been bleak and cynical, and Sorcerer may be the purest expression of that. Its heroes are a hard-bitten New Jersey hood (a spectacularly testy Roy Scheider) hiding out after shooting a mobster’s brother, a crooked French banker (Bruno Cremer) on the run following fraud accusations, a Palestinian terrorist (Amidou) behind a Jerusalem bombing, and a Mexican hitman (Francisco Rabal) who gets in on the job after murdering the fourth driver (Karl John), apparently a fugitive Nazi. The film presents their crimes as facts and without real judgment, their rottenness just another bad part of a burned-out, brutal world.

Where The French Connection and The Exorcist gave viewers visceral thrills early on and some sense of right and wrong (even if it’s fatally compromised), the early action in Sorcerer is more painful, with suicide, terrorism, and the loss of friends and partners forming the four prologues introducing the men at this film’s center. Friedkin then drops us into squalor and despair in a small South American town where the heat and rain are nearly as oppressive as the police state, the work is dangerous and pays little, and the mud seems to soak up any sense of hope. It’s little wonder that they might take up the dangerous assignment of driving through an arduous jungle landscape with unstable explosives that could set off at any moment. When you’ve been driven into no man’s land by your sins, any way out is worth it — no matter how unlikely it is that you’ll survive.

The actual drive up to the oil well doesn’t begin until about halfway through and takes on the tone of an unusually fraught funeral march for the protagonists. Friedkin’s immediate, docurealistic style helps ground the proceedings as set-pieces grow more heightened, most memorably when the drivers guide their trucks over a deteriorating bridge as the river beneath it overflows — the most expensive sequence in the film, as well as the most difficult-to-shoot of Friedkin’s career. As Popeye Doyle’s car chase in The French Connection and Regan & Chris MacNeil getting jerked around in The Exorcist evince, Friedkin always had a gift for making scenes that were already dangerous in conception even more tactile and nerve-wracking. Here, his emphasis on the mechanics of the crossing – the snapping rope and wood – as well as the fragility of the bodies attempting to cross (particularly as one rider steps outside to guide the truck and risks getting thrown off or crushed in the process) make the danger of their situation all the more palpable.

Yet there’s a more existential doom permeating the film compared with the nihilism of his earlier efforts, a more complete melding of his hard-bitten style with expressionistic touches that peppered The Exorcist. Part of that comes from Tangerine Dream’s ethereal score, which accentuates a sense that the elements are set against the drivers. But Friedkin also lends the film’s grungy look a sort of otherworldly menace, whether the camera soars through gorgeous greenery while a fire burns in the background or Scheider envisions a stream of blood soaking the dirt.  Even the small moments of beauty (e.g. a butterfly hiding from the rain or a woman briefly dancing with Scheider) seem to tease the protagonists and underline their utter hopelessness. By the time we reach a grim conclusion, Friedkin has taken us through a world without mercy or decency, in which fate mocks even the most resilient of us.

Martin Scorsese’s New York, New York, released just a few days earlier on June 21, was less plausibly affected by the release of Star Wars, and more likely the victim of critics and audiences being put off by its mix of glossy, Vincente Minnelli-esque musicality and aggressive, John Cassavetes-influenced verisimilitude. Scorsese, with the story of a creative and personal relationship collapsing under the weight of jealousy in a postwar environment, sought to bring to the forefront the unhappiness lurking under the surface of films such as Meet Me in St. Louis and My Dream is Yours.

It, like Sorcerer, had a difficult production, with the director battling a severe cocaine addiction while breaking up with then-wife Julia Cameron and carrying out an affair with lead actress Liza Minnelli. The film’s herky-jerky rhythms and circular intensity seem to take cues from that tension, the big-band musical numbers clashing with deliberately repetitive improvisations and screaming matches. Scorsese had mixed realism with melodrama (Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore) and grit with florid formalism (Taxi Driver) previously, and would go on to marry his classic and New Hollywood interests more palatably in Raging Bull. But New York, New York isn’t a marriage so much as it’s a push-pull war, one that’s sometimes exhausting.

Acknowledging the unattainability of Hollywood fantasies makes it no less vital a love letter. Scorsese opens with an astonishing crane shot on V-j Day as Robert De Niro’s Jimmy gets lost in the excitement of a crowd, only to appear under an arrow that both pinpoints and isolates him. De Niro’s first interactions with Minnelli’s Francine, meanwhile, are less a meet-cute, more an ongoing, insistent harassment that eventually wears down her defenses. The entire opening sequence communicates a sense of spiritual and personal emptiness amid celebration, an early warning that not all is well in the postwar era.

De Niro continues playing Jimmy as a halfway point between his insecure, jealous bruiser in Raging Bull and his relentless, obnoxious pest in The King of Comedy, but Scorsese finds some truth in his and Francine’s romance (even as it’s rotting from the inside out) in their musical performances, with the two finding a better balance and greater chemistry as they perform “You Brought a New Kind of Love to Me.” Their partnership flourishes out of a mutual recognition of talent — or, in his case, recognition of greater possible success together. Still, that balance begins to tip whenever Francine asserts herself, as in a scene where she tries to pep up the band following one of Jimmy’s criticisms, only for him to tear her down. And the film’s most gorgeous images undermine any possibility of happiness between the two, with De Niro proposing (badly: “I love you… I mean, I don’t love you. I dig you; I like you a lot”) in front of a fake forest.

Purposefully, the film’s first two hours give more emphasis to Scorsese’s more discursive side, major arguments between Jimmy and Francine getting interrupted by Jimmy’s ability to get into a minor argument with anyone he encounters. It’s in the final third that focus shifts to the director’s inner formalist and New York, New York turns into a proper musical with the remarkably bittersweet “Happy Endings” sequence. Francine’s finally given a chance to flourish as a performer, unhindered by Jimmy’s jealousy, and Scorsese jumps into an unabashedly stagey finale not unlike that of The Band Wagon or An American in Paris.

Yet the climax still reflects the inherent unhappiness in Francine’s life, telling a story of a relationship ended by success, only to double back and conclude with a wish-fulfillment coda that only makes it more painful. We’ve already seen the truth in the lives of Francine and Jimmy, and no rousing performance of “Theme from ‘New York, New York’” is going to change that. Their final encounter twists the knife further, giving one last tease of possible reconciliation before recognizing that it’s impossible, leaving Jimmy with a final, lonely shot echoing that V-j Day opening.

Audiences and critics largely rejected New York, New York and Sorcerer, with neither film making its budget back or earning the raves their makers had come to expect, but time has been kind to both. They haven’t exactly seen widespread reevaluation as their makers’ best works — Sorcerer wouldn’t be too far off for this writer, and Scorsese’s film has its passionate advocates — but they’ve developed cult followings and at least partly shaken off their previous distinctions as merely ambitious follies. Perhaps it’s appropriate that they’re not as widely cited as Taxi Driver and The Exorcist – they’re pricklier than their more popular predecessors, better suited as advanced viewing than introductory works. They may not generate thousands upon thousands of appreciations 40 years later, but they’re there, waiting for curious viewers to make a discovery. »

- The Film Stage

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Luke's Original Star Wars Lightsaber Goes Up for Auction

12 June 2017 9:09 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

If you're a Star Wars collector with some very deep pockets, you may want to head out to Los Angeles at the end of this month, because you could take home the original Luke Skywalker lightsaber. This historic item is just one of three Star Wars pieces that will be sold off at the Profiles in History auction, which will take place between Monday, June 26 and Wednesday, June 28. Here's the official description of the lightsaber, revealing where it came from.

"Profiles in History is proud to announce, Mark Hamill's screen used Luke Skywalker Lightsaber from A New Hope and Empire Strikes Back will be going up for auction during their three day Hollywood Auction 89 in Los Angeles. It comes directly from the archive of Gary Kurtz, producer of a A New Hope and Empire Strikes Back. It is accompanied by a letter of authenticity signed by Kurtz. It is »

- MovieWeb

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The Exorcist Is Returning For Another Season, But Geena Davis Isn’t

9 June 2017 11:06 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Fox had an unexpected hit on their hands with the first season of The Exorcist, picking up a smattering of positive critical notices and decent ratings. So, it’s no surprise that they renewed it for a second season. The show is a loose sequel to the 1973 William Friedkin movie classic, following a trio of Exorcist priests, with the first season exploring what happened to formerly possessed puker Regan MacNeil over the last forty or so years.

In an eye-catching bit of casting, Geena Davis was brought on board as MacNeil and was generally agreed to be one of the best things in the series. That makes it a little disappointing then that she’s confirmed that she’s departing the show. Rather than re-cast the role, executive producer and director Jeremy Slater has simply decided to focus the second season narrative elsewhere.

This means, apparently, not just jettisoning Davis’ character, »

- David James

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Horror Highlights: 5 Nights Of Fear on Shout! Factory TV, Creepy Co. Pin, Horror Movie Night Podcast’s Fundraiser to Fight Als, Jasmine

9 June 2017 9:23 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Rabid, and Clive Barker's Nightbreed are just a couple of films in the lineup for Shout! Factory TV's 5 Nights of Fear. Prepare thyself. Also in today's Horror Highlights: a new Beistle Cat special edition pin from Creepy Co., details on Horror Movie Night podcast's fundraiser to raise money for FamilyStrong4ALS, and Jasmine release details.

Shout! Factory TV's Five Nights of Fear Details: Press Release: "Scream Factory™ is celebrating five years of fear with the special screening event 5 Nights of Fear airing on Shout! Factory TV. In celebration of the now-iconic horror brand’s fifth anniversary, Scream Factory will present nightly screenings of cult favorite films Nightbreed, Bad Moon, The Exorcist III, Hellhole, and Rabid. 5 Nights of Fear will air from Monday, June 12 through Friday, June 16 each evening at 10 p.m. Et/7 p.m. Pt at http://www.shoutfactorytv.com/, and on Pluto TV Channel 512.

On Monday, the terrifying celebration »

- Tamika Jones

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Update on the Cast for Season 2 of Fox’s The Exorcist TV Series

7 June 2017 10:54 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Back in May, fans of Fox's The Exorcist TV series rejoiced when the network announced that the series would be returning for a second season, but according to the latest casting details, there will be some big changes in the show moving forward.

According to TVLine, while Alfonso Herrera, Kurt Egyiawan and Ben Daniels—who all play priests on the series—will return as series regulars in season 2 of The Exorcist, the actors who played the members of the Rance family—Geena Davis, Alan Ruck, Hannah Kasulka and Brianne Howey—will not be coming back in a series regular capacity, as a different exorcism is expected to take the spotlight this time around.

A family plagued by demonic possession, the Rances were the primary focus of the priests in season 1, but season 2 will explore "a new storyline," as showrunner Jeremy Slater mentioned to Deadline in late 2016, adding that it "doesn »

- Derek Anderson

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William Friedkin to be Honored at Spain’s Sitges Festival

31 May 2017 10:21 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Barcelona — Academy Award-winning director William Friedkin will receive the Grand Honorary Award at Sitges’ Catalonia Intl. Fantastic Film Festival as Europe’s biggest fantasy-genre fest celebrates its 50th edition this October.

Friedkin was the recipient of a Sitges’ Time Machine Honorary Award in 2007. He won a Best Picture Oscar in 1972 for “The French Connection” and was nominated again the following year for “The Exorcist,” which won William Peter Blatty, author of the novel which inspired the film, an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Director of  “Bug,” “Rampage,” “The Night They Raided Minsky’s” and “To Live and Die in L.A.,” Friedkin recently directed the documentary “The Devil and Father Amorth,” about a real-life exorcism. Ld Entertainment acquired worldwide rights to “Amorth” this month.

Another genre heavyweight coming to Sitges is Hong Kong film director and producer Johnnie To, who will join Guillermo del Toro as a festival  godfather. A »

- Emilio Mayorga

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10th Anniversary: Bug

25 May 2017 7:40 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

By Dancin' Dan

Ten years ago right about now, William Friedkin's adaptation of Tracy Letts's play Bug opened in theaters, introducing most of America to Michael Shannon and gifting Ashley Judd with the best part of her career. Unfortunately, though, Bug was marketed as a body horror movie from the director of The Exorcist, which is... not what it is. At all »

- Denny

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How Mark Hamill wanted to change Han Solo’s Star Wars: The Force Awakens death

25 May 2017 6:25 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

One of Episode VII’s most important scenes comes towards the end of the picture when Kylo Ren murders his father Han Solo on Starkiller Base with Rey and Finn watching from afar. It was a tragic moment to be sure, and a pretty grim way to say goodbye to Harrison Ford’s much beloved and iconic character.

Well it turns out that Mark Hamill, whose own legendary character, Luke, was revealed in the film’s final moments, thought he had a better idea for Han’s death. Speaking to Vanity Fair, Hamill explains in detail what he wanted to occur, with Luke and Leia to be present at the scene of the crime.

“Now, remember, one of the plots in the earlier films was the telepathic communication between my sister and me,” Hamill explains. “So I thought, Carrie will sense that Han is in danger and try to contact me. »

- Samuel Brace

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The Scariest Scenes in TV History — IndieWire Critics Survey

23 May 2017 10:36 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What is the scariest moment or scene on TV?

Ben Travers (@BenTTravers), IndieWire

Though there are moments within “Penny Dreadful” (the seance) and “The X-Files” (“Home”) that left me spooked, the title for scariest TV scene has to go to the only show to give me nightmares — actual, legitimate nightmares. After watching the first two episodes of “Hannibal,” I woke up in the middle of the night, drenched in sweat and haunted by a bright red room with blood running down the walls — twice! Two weeks in a row, “Hannibal” ruined my peaceful slumber, and I had to stop watching the show live (and during the night entirely). Each week, »

- Hanh Nguyen

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The Scariest Scenes in TV History — IndieWire Critics Survey

23 May 2017 10:36 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What is the scariest moment or scene on TV?

Ben Travers (@BenTTravers), IndieWire

Though there are moments within “Penny Dreadful” (the seance) and “The X-Files” (“Home”) that left me spooked, the title for scariest TV scene has to go to the only show to give me nightmares — actual, legitimate nightmares. After watching the first two episodes of “Hannibal,” I woke up in the middle of the night, drenched in sweat and haunted by a bright red room with blood running down the walls — twice! Two weeks in a row, “Hannibal” ruined my peaceful slumber, and I had to stop watching the show live (and during the night entirely). Each week, »

- Hanh Nguyen

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Universal Studios Halloween Horror Nights to Debut The Shining Maze in September 2017

23 May 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Horror News | See recent Horror News news »

May 23, 2017 is the 37th anniversary of the release of Stanley Kubrick’s film version of Stephen King’s novel The Shining and it has come to our attention that Universal Studios Halloween Horror Nights will follow up their tribute to William Friedkin’s The Exorcist with an attraction for Mr. Kubrick’s film that replicates the hedge …

The post Universal Studios Halloween Horror Nights to Debut The Shining Maze in September 2017 first appeared on Hnn | Horrornews.net 2017 - Official Horror News Site »

- Jonathan Stryker

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Mezco Toyz Looks to Turn Heads with New Photos & Release Details for The Exorcist Living Dead Doll

17 May 2017 7:49 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

This is one doll that won't play nice with the Cabbage Patch Kids. Regan MacNeil's possessed state from William Friedkin's The Exorcist is captured with menace and glee in Mezco's new addition to their popular Living Dead Dolls line.

From Mezco Toyz: "The Living Dead Dolls Present The Exorcist

The Exorcist burst onto the cinematic scene in 1973 and quickly cemented its place in film history as the 1st horror film nominated for an Academy Award. The film tells the terrifying story of the demonic possession of a young girl and her Mother's attempts to win back her child through an exorcism conducted by two priests.

Now The Living Dead Dolls welcome the tormented youth into their family with a new doll that is sure to make heads spin. Based on the groundbreaking FX used in the film to portray demonic possession, The Living Dead Dolls have created an all-new »

- Derek Anderson

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Newswire: William Friedkin’s exorcism documentary will see the light of day

16 May 2017 9:42 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

The Exorcist has assumed a new form on Fox, where Jeremy Slater’s small-screen iteration was recently granted a season-two renewal. But William Friedkin, the director of the feature adaptation of William Peter Blatty’s book, has far from washed his hands of the whole thing. In fact, he recently helmed a documentary about exorcism titled The Devil And Father Amorth, in which he visited with a Vatican-approved exorcist. Friedkin shot Father Gabriel Amorth’s demon-battling work for the project, and now that film could soon make its way to a greater audience. Deadline reports that The Devil and Father Amorth has been picked up by Ld Entertainment, who is eyeing a release with co-producers ICM Partners.

Of the news, Friedkin said, “I never stopped being fascinated by the nature of good and evil and the possibility of demonic possession. The opportunity for me to witness and film an ...

»

- Danette Chavez

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William Friedkin Returns To Exorcism With Documentary ‘The Devil And Father Amorth’

15 May 2017 8:32 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Things have been pretty quiet from “The Exorcist” director William Friedkin lately, and six years have passed since his nasty, underrated “Killer Joe.” A slew of projects have been lined up during that time — “The Winter Of Frankie Machine,” a TV series based on “To Live And Die In L.A.,” a TV series based on “Killer Joe,” and a Mae West biopic starring Bette Midler — but nothing has come to pass.

Continue reading William Friedkin Returns To Exorcism With Documentary ‘The Devil And Father Amorth’ at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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‘The Exorcist’ Documentary: William Friedkin Working on a Nonfiction Follow-Up to His Horror Classic

13 May 2017 11:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Some demons take longer to exorcise than others. That would appear to be the case with “The Exorcist” itself, as William Friedkin is set to make a documentary about his classic horror movie more than 40 years after it was first released (and, according to reports, scared some moviegoers out of the theater and into the hospital).

Read More: Listen: William Friedkin Talks ‘French Connection,’ ‘Sorcerer,’ ‘The Exorcist’ & More In Epic 2.5 Hour ‘Wtf’ Podcast Interview

“The Devil and Father Amorth” will look at Friedkin’s film in relation to actual exorcisms, specifically those carried out by Father Gabriele Amorth, Aka the “Dean of Exorcists.” Friedkin was present for one such event, later writing about it for Vanity Fair: “I’ve never stopped being fascinated by the nature of good and evil, and the possibility of demonic possession. The opportunity for me to witness and film an actual exorcism came about, more »

- Michael Nordine

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William Friedkin’s Doc on Real-Life Exorcism Acquired by Ld Entertainment

12 May 2017 5:14 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

It’s been over 43 years since “The Exorcist” first frightened theatergoers and Oscar voters alike, yet director William Friedkin is still taken by the subject. So much so, that he’s filmed a documentary about a real-life exorcism, entitled “The Devil and Father Amorth.”

Ld Entertainment announced Friday that it has acquired worldwide rights to the doc.

Related

The Exorcist’ Renewed for Season 2 at Fox

The feature follows Father Gabriele Amorth as he performs his ninth exorcism on a woman from Italy whose behavioral changes cannot be helped by psychiatry. Friedkin’s project will also compare 2017’s modern exorcism techniques to those illustrated in the 1973 original film.

“I’ve never stopped being fascinated by the nature of good and evil, and the possibility of demonic possession,” said Friedkin in a statement. “The opportunity for me to witness and film an actual exorcism came about, more than four decades after I made ‘The Exorcist, »

- JD Knapp

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Ld Entertainment acquires rights to 'The Devil And Father Amorth'

12 May 2017 4:30 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

William Friedkin documentary chronicles actual exorcism.

Mickey Liddell’s Ld Entertainment and producer Pete Shilaimon have reteamed with William Friedkin, acquiring the worldwide rights to his documentary The Devil And Father Amorth.

The documentary explores how Friedkin’s 1973 classic The Exorcist compares to an actual exorcism.

In the more than 40 years since the release of his acclaimed horror film, Friedkin was fascinated how close he came to reality in the depiction of events in his film.

The filmmaker received permission to attend and film Father Gabriele Amorth’s ninth exorcism on an Italian woman who had been experiencing troubling fits. The documentary is in post.

“I’ve never stopped being fascinated by the nature of good and evil, and the possibility of demonic possession,” Friedkin said. “The opportunity for me to witness and film an actual exorcism came about, more than four decades after I made The Exorcist, completely by accident.”

Liddell added: »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Ld Entertainment Compels William Friedkin’s The Devil and Father Amorth

12 May 2017 3:52 PM, PDT | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

Can you possibly think of a better person to bring us a tale of demonic possession other than William Friedkin? The man forever changed the landscape with The Exorcist, and hopefully he’ll be able to do it again with The… Continue Reading →

The post Ld Entertainment Compels William Friedkin’s The Devil and Father Amorth appeared first on Dread Central. »

- Steve Barton

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